WorldCat Linked Data Explorer

http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1044600916

Food and the city urban agriculture and the new food revolution

A global movement to take back our food is growing. The future of farming is in our hands'and in our cities. When you're standing in the midst of a supermarket, it's hard to imagine that you're looking at a failing industrial food system. The abundance all around you looks impressive but is really a facade. In fact, there's just a three-day supply of food available for any given city due to complex, just-in-time international supply chains. The system is not only vulnerable, given the reality of food scares, international crises, terrorist attacks, economic upheavals, and natural disasters, but it is also environmentally unsustainable for the long term. As the cold hard facts of peak oil and peak water begin to have an impact, how will we feed a world population of seven billion and growing, most of whom are now urban dwellers' One answer is urban agriculture. This book examines alternative food systems in cities around the globe that are shortening their food chains, growing food within their city limits, and taking their "food security" into their own hands. This award-winning food journalist sought out leaders in the urban-agriculture movement and visited cities successfully dealing with "food deserts." What she found was not just a niche concern of activists but a global movement that cuts across the private and public spheres, economic classes, and cultures. She describes a global movement happening from London and Paris to Vancouver and New York to establish alternatives to the monolithic globally integrated supermarket model. A cadre of forward-looking, innovative people has created growing spaces in cities: on rooftops, backyards, vacant lots, along roadways, and even in "vertical farms." Whether it's a community public orchard supplying the needs of local residents or an urban farm that has reclaimed a derelict inner city lot to grow and sell premium market veggies to restaurant chefs, the urban food revolution is clearly underway and working. This book is an exciting, fascinating chronicle of a game-changing movement, a rebellion against the industrial food behemoth, and a reclaiming of communities to grow, distribute, and eat locally.

Open All Close All

http://schema.org/about

http://schema.org/description

  • "Discusses how urban agriculture can help revolutionize the environmentally unsustainable modern food industry, providing evidence of thriving urban farms within "food deserts" and describing the global movement towards alternative food production.--Source inconnue."
  • "A global movement to take back our food is growing. The future of farming is in our hands'and in our cities. When you're standing in the midst of a supermarket, it's hard to imagine that you're looking at a failing industrial food system. The abundance all around you looks impressive but is really a facade. In fact, there's just a three-day supply of food available for any given city due to complex, just-in-time international supply chains. The system is not only vulnerable, given the reality of food scares, international crises, terrorist attacks, economic upheavals, and natural disasters, but it is also environmentally unsustainable for the long term. As the cold hard facts of peak oil and peak water begin to have an impact, how will we feed a world population of seven billion and growing, most of whom are now urban dwellers' One answer is urban agriculture. This book examines alternative food systems in cities around the globe that are shortening their food chains, growing food within their city limits, and taking their "food security" into their own hands. This award-winning food journalist sought out leaders in the urban-agriculture movement and visited cities successfully dealing with "food deserts." What she found was not just a niche concern of activists but a global movement that cuts across the private and public spheres, economic classes, and cultures. She describes a global movement happening from London and Paris to Vancouver and New York to establish alternatives to the monolithic globally integrated supermarket model. A cadre of forward-looking, innovative people has created growing spaces in cities: on rooftops, backyards, vacant lots, along roadways, and even in "vertical farms." Whether it's a community public orchard supplying the needs of local residents or an urban farm that has reclaimed a derelict inner city lot to grow and sell premium market veggies to restaurant chefs, the urban food revolution is clearly underway and working. This book is an exciting, fascinating chronicle of a game-changing movement, a rebellion against the industrial food behemoth, and a reclaiming of communities to grow, distribute, and eat locally."@en
  • "Discusses how urban agriculture can help revolutionize the environmentally unsustainable modern food industry, providing evidence of thriving urban farms within "food deserts" and describing the global movement towards alternative food production."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Electronic books"

http://schema.org/name

  • "Food and the city urban agriculture and the new food revolution"@en
  • "Food and the city urban agriculture and the new food revolution"
  • "Food and the city : urban agriculture and the new food revolution"@en
  • "Food and the city : urban agriculture and the new food revolution"