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Daisy Miller

Frederick Winterbourne, an American expatriate visiting at Vevey, Switzerland, meets commonplace, newly rich Mrs. Miller from Schenectady, N.Y., her mischievous small son, Randolph, and her daughter, Daisy, an "inscrutable combination of audacity and innocence." The Millers have no perception of the complex code that underlies behavior in European society, and Winterbourne is astonished at the girl's innocence and her mother's unconcern when Daisy accompanies him to the Castle of Chillon. Some months later he meets the family in Rome, where Daisy has aroused suspicion among the American colony by being seen constantly with Giovanelli, a third-rate Italian. Ostracized by former friends who think her "intrigue" has gone too far, Daisy denies to Winterbourne that she is engaged to Giovanelli. In public, Winterbourne defends her as simply uncultivated; privately, he hesitates.

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  • "Tammy Grimes reads Henry James's Daisy Miller"@en

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http://schema.org/description

  • "Frederick Winterbourne, an American expatriate visiting at Vevey, Switzerland, meets commonplace, newly rich Mrs. Miller from Schenectady, N.Y., her mischievous small son, Randolph, and her daughter, Daisy, an "inscrutable combination of audacity and innocence." The Millers have no perception of the complex code that underlies behavior in European society, and Winterbourne is astonished at the girl's innocence and her mother's unconcern when Daisy accompanies him to the Castle of Chillon. Some months later he meets the family in Rome, where Daisy has aroused suspicion among the American colony by being seen constantly with Giovanelli, a third-rate Italian. Ostracized by former friends who think her "intrigue" has gone too far, Daisy denies to Winterbourne that she is engaged to Giovanelli. In public, Winterbourne defends her as simply uncultivated; privately, he hesitates."
  • "Frederick Winterbourne, an American expatriate visiting at Vevey, Switzerland, meets commonplace, newly rich Mrs. Miller from Schenectady, N.Y., her mischievous small son, Randolph, and her daughter, Daisy, an "inscrutable combination of audacity and innocence." The Millers have no perception of the complex code that underlies behavior in European society, and Winterbourne is astonished at the girl's innocence and her mother's unconcern when Daisy accompanies him to the Castle of Chillon. Some months later he meets the family in Rome, where Daisy has aroused suspicion among the American colony by being seen constantly with Giovanelli, a third-rate Italian. Ostracized by former friends who think her "intrigue" has gone too far, Daisy denies to Winterbourne that she is engaged to Giovanelli. In public, Winterbourne defends her as simply uncultivated; privately, he hesitates."@en
  • ""The innocent and insolent Daisy confronts the traditions of old Europe and confounds all of the people, especially the men, who surround her"--Container."@en
  • "Daisy Miller, a young American travelling abroad for the first time, openly ignores the rigid European social code of the day and earns the disapproval of her fellow Americans."@en
  • "Henry James' classic tale of love and innocence."@en
  • "Henry James' classic tale of love and innocence."
  • "What the European male fails to understand is that the American girl is innocent by definition, mythically innocent", and, the confusion of Winterbourne is aggravated by the atmosphere in Vevey, a no-man's land half-way between the grimness of Geneva and the moral laxity of Rome. Winterbourne mistakes Daisy's frank manner for commonness, yet he is also aware of her delicate grace."
  • "When Frederick, an American expatriate traveling in Europe, meets the newly rich Miller family from New York, he is charmed by the daughter, Daisy. Some months later, he meets the family in Rome, where Daisy has aroused suspicion among the American colony by being seen constantly with a third-rate Italian. Ostracized by former friends who think her 'intrigue' has gone too far, Daisy denies that she is engaged to Giovanelli."@en
  • "When Frederick, an American expatriate traveling in Europe, meets the commonplace, newly rich Miller family from New York, he is charmed by the daughter, Daisy, and her "inscrutable combination of audacity and innocence." The Millers have no perception of the complex code that underlies behavior in European society, and Winterbourne is astonished at the girl's unworldliness and her mother's unconcern when Daisy accompanies him to the Castle of Chillon. Some months later, he meets the family in Rome, where Daisy has aroused suspicion among the American colony by being seen constantly with a third-rate Italian. Ostracized by former friends who think her "intrigue" has gone too far, Daisy denies that she is engaged to Giovanelli. Publicly, Winterbourne defends her as simply uncultivated, but privately, he hesitates."@en
  • "When Daisy Miller, a young American woman, visits Rome, she has no idea the local customs vary so much from her home. She sets tongues gossiping with her free-spirited actions, such as walking in public with men. She must be made aware of the inherent dangers that lie behind the different ways of doing things."
  • "Frederick Winterbourne, an American expatriate visiting at Vevey, Switzerland, meets commonplace, newly rich Mrs. Miller from Schenectady, New York, her mischievous small son and her daughter, Daisy, an inscrutable combination of audacity and innocence.' The Millers have no perception of the complex code that underlies behavior in European society, and Winterbourne is astonished at the girl's innocent naivetE and her mother's unconcern, both of which lead to trouble for Daisy."@en
  • "The innocent and insolent Daisy confronts the traditions of Old Europe."@en
  • ""When Daisy Miller, a young American woman, visits Rome, she has no idea the local customs vary so much from her home. She sets tongues gossiping with her free-spirited actions, such as walking in public with men. She must be made aware of the inherent dangers that lie behind the different ways of doing things."--Container."
  • ""Daisy Miller is a beautiful and flirtatious rich young American visiting a Swiss spa. There she meets upper class expatriate American, Frederick Winterbourne, who is warned about her reckless ways with men by his aunt. Their relationship and Daisy's with the Italian lawyer Mr. Giovanelli leads to a climactic scene in the Coliseum in Rome, followed by tragedy and regret"--Publisher's summary."@en
  • "Frederick Winterbourne, an American expatriate visiting at Vevey, Switzerland, meets commonplace, newly rich Mrs. Miller from Schenectady, New York, her mischievous small son and her daughter, Daisy, an inscrutable combination of audacity and innocence. The Millers have no perception of the complex code that underlies behavior in European society, and Winterbourne is astonished at the girl's innocent naivete and her mother's unconcern, both of which lead to trouble for Daisy."@en
  • "" Daisy Miller, Henry James' novel of manners and morals, has been called one of his finest. It reveals America as a young, vibrant, and often careless society, while European culture appears as jaded, steeped in propriety and old world values. When Daisy Miller, a young American woman, visits Rome, she has no idea the local customs vary so much from her home. She sets tongues gossiping with her free-spirited actions, such as walking in public with men. She must be made aware of the inherent dangers that lie behind the different ways of doing things. Daisy is as free as the air, but her garden of earthly pleasures stings with the thorns of youth, tradition, and love. Narrator Flo Gibson eloquently portrays Daisy's innocence and insolence."--Container."
  • "Daisy is as free as the air, but an innocent abroad. Her life encompasses the tragic difficulties of youth, tradition and love."@en
  • "Daisy Miller is a beautiful and flirtatious rich young American visiting a Swiss spa. There she meets upper class expatriate American, Frederick Winterbourne, who is warned about her reckless ways with men by his aunt. Their relationship and Daisy's with the Italian lawyer Mr. Giovanelli leads to a climactic scene in the Coliseum in Rome, followed by tragedy and regret."@en
  • "A young American abroad for the first time violates the social codes, offending her fellow Americans, and eventually pays for her indiscretions with her life."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Downloadable audiobooks"@en
  • "Kvindeskildringer"@da
  • "Romantic suspense fiction"@en
  • "Downloadable audio books"
  • "Downloadable audio books"@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Audiobooks"
  • "Audiobooks"@en
  • "Bildungsromans"
  • "Bildungsromans"@en
  • "Psychological fiction"@en
  • "Psychological fiction"

http://schema.org/name

  • "Daisy Miller"@da
  • "Daisy Miller"@en
  • "Daisy Miller"@it
  • "Daisy Miller"
  • "Daisy Miller [electronic resource]"@en

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