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So Rich, So Poor Why It's So Hard to End Poverty in America

Income disparities in our wealthy nation are now wider than at any point since the Great Depression. The structure of today's economy has stultified wage growth for half of America's workers-with even worse results at the bottom and for people of color-while bestowing billions on those at the top. In this?accessible and inspiring analysis" (Angela Glover Blackwell), lifelong anti?poverty advocate Peter Edelman assesses how the United States can have such an outsized number of unemployed and working poor despite important policy gains. He delves into what is happening to the peopl.

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  • "Income disparities in our wealthy nation are now wider than at any point since the Great Depression. The structure of today's economy has stultified wage growth for half of America's workers-with even worse results at the bottom and for people of color-while bestowing billions on those at the top. In this?accessible and inspiring analysis" (Angela Glover Blackwell), lifelong anti?poverty advocate Peter Edelman assesses how the United States can have such an outsized number of unemployed and working poor despite important policy gains. He delves into what is happening to the peopl."@en
  • "Offers an informed analysis of how the United States can be so wealthy yet have an outsized number of unemployed and working poor."
  • "Why are nearly 50 million people in the richest nation in the world counted as poor and what do we need to do to change that? Peter Edelman, once a top aide to Senator Robert F. Kennedy and a lifelong advocate on these issues, looks at the economic and political history of the past half century and offers some answers. We have taken important positive steps without which 25 to 30 million more people would be poor, but poverty has fluctuated with the business cycle. The answer lies primarily in the fundamental restructuring of the economy that stultified wage growth for half of America's workers, with even worse results at the bottom and for people of color, and bestowed billions on those at the top."@en
  • "Income disparities in our wealthy nation are now wider than at any point since the Great Depression. In 2010, the average compensation for CEOs on the S & P 500 was over $11 million, while a quarter of all jobs in the country paid less than the poverty line--$22,000 for a family of four. Yet our GDP now exceeds $15 trillion. How can some be so rich, while others are so poor? In this book, lifelong antipoverty advocate Peter Edelman offers an informed analysis of how this country can be so wealthy yet have such an outsized number of unemployed and working poor. Although Edelman argues we have taken important positive steps without which 40 million more people would be poor, poverty nevertheless fluctuates with the business cycle. The structure of today's economy has stultified wage growth for half of America's workers--with even worse results at the bottom and for people of color--while bestowing billions on those at the top. So Rich, So Poor delves into what is happening to the people behind the statistics and takes a particular look at the continuing crisis of young people of color, whose possibility of productive lives too often is lost on their way to adulthood. This book is crucial election-year reading fro anyone who wants to understand the most critical American dilemma of the twenty-first century."

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  • "Electronic books"@en

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  • "So rich, so poor : why it's so hard to end poverty in America"
  • "So Rich, So Poor Why It's So Hard to End Poverty in America"@en
  • "So rich, so poor why it's so hard to end poverty in America"@en
  • "So rich, so poor why it's so hard to end poverty in America"