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Inferno

Robert Pinsky's new verse translation of the Inferno makes it clear to the contemporary listener, as no other in English has done, why Dante is universally considered a poet of great power, intensity, and strength. This critically acclaimed translation was awarded the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Poetry and the Harold Morton Landon Translation Award given by the Academy of American Poets. Well versed, rapid, and various in style, the Inferno is narrated by Pinsky and three other leading poets: Seamus Heaney, Frank Bidart, and Louise Glück.

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http://schema.org/description

  • "Robert Pinsky's new verse translation of the Inferno makes it clear to the contemporary listener, as no other in English has done, why Dante is universally considered a poet of great power, intensity, and strength. This critically acclaimed translation was awarded the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Poetry and the Harold Morton Landon Translation Award given by the Academy of American Poets. Well versed, rapid, and various in style, the Inferno is narrated by Pinsky and three other leading poets: Seamus Heaney, Frank Bidart, and Louise Glück."@en
  • "A translation of Renaissance poet Dante Alighieri's story of a man making his way through the torment of Hell in search of Paradise."@en
  • "Presents the epic poem of the poet's journey through Hell. He is drawn into the nine circles of Hell, each more horrible, until finally he comes forth."@en
  • "Presents a new verse translation of the Dante's Inferno."@en
  • ""Dante Aligheri's magnificent story of his journey through the infinite horrors of Hell and past the gates inscribed with the timeless words: Abandon Hope All Ye Who Enter Here. The poem is a terrifying vision of the consequences of sin, a daring quest for the path to Paradise, and a vivid pageant of the Middle Ages"--Container back cover insert."@en
  • "The first of the three canticles in The Divine Comedy, this fourteenth-century allegorical poem begins Dante's imaginary journey from Hell to Purgatory to Paradise with his sojourn among the damned."@en
  • "In spite of Dante's reputation as the greatest of Christian poets, there is no sign of Christian givenness in the Inferno. The dominant theme is not mercy but justice, dispensed with the severity of the ancient law of retribution. The moral system of Hell owes more to ancient philosophy than it does to medieval classifications of virtues and vices, while the landscape of the underworld derives from Virgil more than from the poetically impoverished visions of the Middle Ages.... Dante's Inferno is a vision of the City of Man in the afterlife, which is why it contains no glimmer of forgiveness. At the same time, it may also be thought of as a radical representation of the world in which we live, stripped of all temporizing and all hope. -Foreword. This translation ... makes a more flexible definition of rhyme, or of the kind and degree of like sound that constitute rhyme. -Translator's note. [The translator] employs slant rhyme and near rhyme to preserve Dante's terza rima form without distorting the flow of English idiom. -Publisher description."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Poetry"
  • "Poetry"@en
  • "Translations"
  • "Audiobooks"@en
  • "Downloadable audio books"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Inferno"@en
  • "The Inferno of Dante a new verse translation"
  • "The Inferno of Dante : a new verse translation"@en
  • "The inferno of Dante"@en
  • "The inferno of Dante"
  • "The inferno of Dante a new verse translation"@en
  • "The Inferno of Dante"@en
  • "The Inferno"