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Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't.

Making the transition from good to great doesn't require a high-profile CEO, the latest technology, innovative change management, or even a fine-tuned business strategy. At the heart of those rare and truly great companies was a corporate culture that rigorously found and promoted disciplined people to think and act in a disciplined manner. Peppered with dozens of stories and examples from the great and not so great, the CD offers a well-reasoned road map to excellence that any organization would do well to consider.

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  • "Making the transition from good to great doesn't require a high-profile CEO, the latest technology, innovative change management, or even a fine-tuned business strategy. At the heart of those rare and truly great companies was a corporate culture that rigorously found and promoted disciplined people to think and act in a disciplined manner. Peppered with dozens of stories and examples from the great and not so great, the CD offers a well-reasoned road map to excellence that any organization would do well to consider."@en
  • "Chapters: 1. Good is the enemy of great -- 2. Level 5 leadership -- 3. First who then what -- 4. Confront the brutal facts (yet never lose faith) -- 5. The hedgehog concept (simplicity within the three circles) -- 6. A culture of discipline -- 7. Technology accelerators -- 8. The flywheel and the doom loop -- 9. From good to great to built to last"
  • "''This carefully researched and well-written book disproves most of the current management hype-from the cult of the superhuman CEO to the cult of IT to the acquisitions and merger mania. It will not enable medicrity to become competence. But it should enable competence to become excellence.'' (Peter F. Drucker) ''A book CEOs can't wait to buy.'' (USA Today) ''Collins and his research team have been tackling one of the biggest questions business has to offer.'' (Fortune) ''With both Good to Great and Built to last, Mr. Collins delivers two seductive messages : that great managements is attainable by mere mortals and that its practitioners can build great institutions, It's juste what us mortals want to hear.'' (Wall Street Journal) '' The difference is how hard Mr. Collins works to arrive at his simple conclusions. They are based on years of detailed, empirical research and are all the more powerful for producing such unexpected results.'' (Financial Times) ''The Business idea of the year.''(Fast Company) '' Collins again has written a book that seems built to last.'' (Business Week)."
  • "Answers to commonly asked questions about how good-to-great principles can help social sector organizations make the leap to greatness, using interviews with over 100 social sector leaders."
  • "The findings of the Good to Great study will surprise many readers and shed light on virtually every area of management strategy and practice."@en
  • "Can a good company become great, and if so, how does that transition process occur? To answer that question, the 40-year operating results of 1,435 established companies were analyzed. From that database, 11 companies were identified which had made a sustainable transition from being good (or average or mediocre) to great. How did these 11 companies become great, and are those lessons replicable? As Jim Collins explains in Good to Great, none of these companies launched radical or high profile change programs. Nor did they have a miracle moment where a flash of inspiration showed them the way to the "Promised Land". Instead, they used down-to-earth and pragmatic programs. In this compelling analysis, the author explains their good-to-great transition process."
  • "This volume answers the compelling question: can a good company become a great company and, if so, how? It uncovers the underlying variables that enable any type of organization to make the leap from good to great while other organizations remain only good."
  • "The Challenge Built to Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the verybeginning. But what about the company that is not born with great DNA' How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad companies achieve enduring greatness' The Study For years, this question preyed on the mind of Jim Collins. Are there companies that defy gravity and convert long-term mediocrity or worse into long-term superiority' And if so, what are the universal distinguishing characteristics that cause a company to go from good to great' The Standards Using tough benchmarks, Collins and his research team identified a set of elite companies that made the leap to great results and sustained those results for at least fifteen years. How great' After the leap, the good-to-great companies generated cumulative stock returns that beat the general stock market by an average of seven times in fifteen years, better than twice the results delivered by a composite index of the world's greatest companies, including Coca-Cola, Intel, General Electric, and Merck. The Comparisons The research team contrasted the good-to-great companies with a carefully selected set of comparison companies that failed to make the leap from good to great. What was different' Why did one set of companies become truly great performers while the other set remained only good' Over five years, the team analyzed the histories of all twenty-eight companies in the study. After sifting through mountains of data and thousands of pages of interviews, Collins and his crew discovered the key determinants of greatness -- why some companies make the leap and others don't. The Findings The findings of the Good to Great study will surprise many readers and shed light on virtually every area of management strategy and practice. The findings include: -Level 5 Leaders: The research team was shocked to discover the type of leadership required to achieve greatness. -The Hedgehog Concept (Simplicity within the Three Circles): To go from good to great requires transcending the curse of competence. -A Culture of Discipline: When you combine a culture of discipline with an ethic of entrepreneurship, you get the magical alchemy of great results. Technology Accelerators: Good-to-great companies think differently about the role of technology. -The Flywheel and the Doom Loop: Those who launch radical change programs and wrenching restructurings will almost certainly fail to make the leap. "Some of the key concepts discerned in the study," comments Jim Collins, "fly in the face of our modern business culture and will, quite frankly, upset some people." Perhaps, but who can afford to ignore these findings'"@en
  • "Collins and his team of researchers began their quest by sorting through a list of 1,435 companies, looking for those that made substantial improvements in their performance over time. They finally settled on 11--including Fannie Mae, Gillette, Walgreens, and Wells Fargo--and discovered common traits that challenged many of the conventional notions of corporate success."@en
  • "The author uses his research on the Fortune 500 to create a blueprint for turning good companies into spectacular ones."

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  • "Electronic books."
  • "Electronic books."@en
  • "Livres électroniques."

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  • "Good to great /"
  • "Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't."@en
  • "Good to great : wyh some companies make the leap... and others don't /"
  • "Good to Great : Why some companies make the leap ... and others don't."@en
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap--and others don't /"
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap... and others don't /"
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap ... and others don't /"
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap ... and others don't /"@en
  • "Good to great: why some companies make the leap--and others don't."
  • "Good to great why some companies make the leap--and others don't /"
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leat ... and others don't /"
  • "Good to great why some companies make the leap...and others don't /"@en
  • "Good to Great."@en
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap-- and others don't /"
  • "Good To Great : Why some companies make the leap and others don't. /"@en
  • "Good to great why some companies make the leap--and others don't : [Summary]."
  • "Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...and Others Don't."
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap... and others don't"
  • "Good to great why some companies make the leap --and other's don't /"
  • "Good to great why some companies make the leap... and others don't /"
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap, and others don't /"
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap ... and others don't."@en
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap and others don't /"@en
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap and others don't /"
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap and others don't /"@sv
  • "Good to great : Why some companies make the leap... and others don't /"
  • "Good to great : why some companies make the leap...and others don't /"@en

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