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This indian country american indian activists and the place they made

Most Americans view Indians as people of the past who occupy a position outside the central narrative of American history. It's assumed that Native history has no particular relationship to what is conventionally presented as the story of America. Indians had a history, but theirs was short and sad, and it ended a long time ago. Here, leading historian Frederick E. Hoxie has created a bold counter-narrative. Native American history, he argues, is also a story of political activism, its victories hard-won in courts and campaigns rather than on the battlefield. For more than two hundred years, Indian activists have sought to bridge the distance between indigenous cultures and the American republic through legal and political debate. Over time their struggle defined a new language of "Indian rights" and created a vision of American Indian identity. Hoxie asks readers to think deeply about how a country based on the values of liberty and equality managed to adapt to the complex demands of people who refused to be overrun or ignored.--From publisher description.

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  • "Most Americans view Indians as people of the past who occupy a position outside the central narrative of American history. It's assumed that Native history has no particular relationship to what is conventionally presented as the story of America. Indians had a history, but theirs was short and sad, and it ended a long time ago. Here, leading historian Frederick E. Hoxie has created a bold counter-narrative. Native American history, he argues, is also a story of political activism, its victories hard-won in courts and campaigns rather than on the battlefield. For more than two hundred years, Indian activists have sought to bridge the distance between indigenous cultures and the American republic through legal and political debate. Over time their struggle defined a new language of "Indian rights" and created a vision of American Indian identity. Hoxie asks readers to think deeply about how a country based on the values of liberty and equality managed to adapt to the complex demands of people who refused to be overrun or ignored.--From publisher description."@en
  • "Most Americans view Indians as people of the past who occupy a position outside the central narrative of American history. It's assumed that Native history has no particular relationship to what is conventionally presented as the story of America. Indians had a history, but theirs was short and sad, and it ended a long time ago. Here, leading historian Frederick E. Hoxie has created a bold counter-narrative. Native American history, he argues, is also a story of political activism, its victories hard-won in courts and campaigns rather than on the battlefield. For more than two hundred years, Indian activists have sought to bridge the distance between indigenous cultures and the American republic through legal and political debate. Over time their struggle defined a new language of "Indian rights" and created a vision of American Indian identity. Hoxie asks readers to think deeply about how a country based on the values of liberty and equality managed to adapt to the complex demands of people who refused to be overrun or ignored.--From publisher description."
  • "A comprehensive history of the heroic men and women who led the struggle for Indian rights In this bold and sweeping counternarrative to our conventional understanding of Native American history, celebrated academic historian Frederick E. Hoxie presents the story of Native American political activism'a chronicle that spans more than two hundred years. Highlighting the activists'some famous and some unknown beyond their own communities'who have sought to bridge the distance between indigenous cultures and the U.S. republic through legal and political campaigns, Hoxie weaves a powerful narrative that connects the individual to the tribe, the tribe to the nation, and the nation to broader historical processes and progressive movements."@en

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  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "History"
  • "History"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "This indian country american indian activists and the place they made"@en
  • "This Indian country : American Indian activists and the place they made"
  • "This Indian Country. ; American Indian Activists and the Place They Made"
  • "This Indian country : American Indian political activists and the place they made"
  • "This Indian country : American Indian political activists and the place they made"@en