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The village 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues, a history of Greenwich Village

A lively anecdotal history of Greenwich Village, the prodigiously influential and infamous New York City neighborhood, from the 1600s to the present The most famous neighborhood in the world, Greenwich Village has been home to outcasts of diverse persuasions'from "half-free" Africans to working-class immigrants, from artists to politicians'for almost four hundred years. In his magisterial new book, cultural commentator John Strausbaugh weaves an absorbing narrative history of the Village, a tapestry that unrolls from its origins as a rural frontier of New Amsterdam in the 1600s through its long reign as the Left Bank of America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from its seat as the epicenter of the gay rights movement to its current status as an affluent bedroom community and tourist magnet. Strausbaugh'"a particularly gifted chronicler of New Yorkiana" (Atlantic Monthly)'traces the Village's role as a culture engine, a bastion of tolerance, freedom, creativity, and activism that has spurred cultural change on a national, and sometimes even international, scale. He brings to life the long line of famous nonconformists who have collided there, collaborating, fusing and feuding, developing the ideas and creating the art that forever altered societal norms. In these pages, geniuses are made and destroyed, careers are launched, and revolutions are born. Poe, Whitman, Cather, Baldwin, Kerouac, Mailer, Ginsberg, O'Neill, Pollock, La Guardia, Koch, Hendrix, and Dylan all come together across the ages, at a cultural crossroads the likes of which we may never see again. From Dutch farmers and Washington Square patricians to slaves and bohemians, from Prohibition-era speakeasies to Stonewall, from Abstract Expressionism to AIDS, and from the Triangle Shirtwaist fire to today's upscale condos and four-star restaurants, the connecting narratives of The Village tell the fresh and unforgettable story of America itself.

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http://schema.org/description

  • "A lively anecdotal history of Greenwich Village, the prodigiously influential and infamous New York City neighborhood, from the 1600s to the present The most famous neighborhood in the world, Greenwich Village has been home to outcasts of diverse persuasions'from "half-free" Africans to working-class immigrants, from artists to politicians'for almost four hundred years. In his magisterial new book, cultural commentator John Strausbaugh weaves an absorbing narrative history of the Village, a tapestry that unrolls from its origins as a rural frontier of New Amsterdam in the 1600s through its long reign as the Left Bank of America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from its seat as the epicenter of the gay rights movement to its current status as an affluent bedroom community and tourist magnet. Strausbaugh'"a particularly gifted chronicler of New Yorkiana" (Atlantic Monthly)'traces the Village's role as a culture engine, a bastion of tolerance, freedom, creativity, and activism that has spurred cultural change on a national, and sometimes even international, scale. He brings to life the long line of famous nonconformists who have collided there, collaborating, fusing and feuding, developing the ideas and creating the art that forever altered societal norms. In these pages, geniuses are made and destroyed, careers are launched, and revolutions are born. Poe, Whitman, Cather, Baldwin, Kerouac, Mailer, Ginsberg, O'Neill, Pollock, La Guardia, Koch, Hendrix, and Dylan all come together across the ages, at a cultural crossroads the likes of which we may never see again. From Dutch farmers and Washington Square patricians to slaves and bohemians, from Prohibition-era speakeasies to Stonewall, from Abstract Expressionism to AIDS, and from the Triangle Shirtwaist fire to today's upscale condos and four-star restaurants, the connecting narratives of The Village tell the fresh and unforgettable story of America itself."@en
  • "This is an anecdotal history of Greenwich Village, the prodigiously influential and infamous New York City neighborhood, from the 1600s to the present. The most famous neighborhood in the world, Greenwich Village has been home to outcasts of diverse persuasions, from "half-free" Africans to working-class immigrants, from artists to politicians, for almost four hundred years. In this book, the author weaves a narrative history of the Village, a tapestry that unrolls from its origins as a rural frontier of New Amsterdam in the 1600s through its long reign as the Left Bank of America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from its seat as the epicenter of the gay rights movement to its current status as an affluent bedroom community and tourist magnet. He traces the Village's role as a culture engine, a bastion of tolerance, freedom, creativity, and activism that has spurred cultural change on a national, and sometimes even international, scale. He brings to life the long line of famous nonconformists who have collided there, collaborating, fusing and feuding, developing the ideas and creating the art that forever altered societal norms. In these pages, geniuses are made and destroyed, careers are launched, and revolutions are born. Poe, Whitman, Cather, Baldwin, Kerouac, Mailer, Ginsberg, O'Neill, Pollock, La Guardia, Koch, Hendrix, and Dylan all come together across the ages, at a cultural crossroads the likes of which we may never see again. From Dutch farmers and Washington Square patricians to slaves and bohemians, from Prohibition-era speakeasies to Stonewall, from Abstract Expressionism to AIDS, and from the Triangle Shirtwaist fire to today's upscale condos and four-star restaurants, the connecting narratives of The Village tell the fresh and unforgettable story of America itself."
  • "This is an anecdotal history of Greenwich Village, the prodigiously influential and infamous New York City neighborhood, from the 1600s to the present. The most famous neighborhood in the world, Greenwich Village has been home to outcasts of diverse persuasions, from "half-free" Africans to working-class immigrants, from artists to politicians, for almost four hundred years. In this book, the author weaves a narrative history of the Village, a tapestry that unrolls from its origins as a rural frontier of New Amsterdam in the 1600s through its long reign as the Left Bank of America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from its seat as the epicenter of the gay rights movement to its current status as an affluent bedroom community and tourist magnet. He traces the Village's role as a culture engine, a bastion of tolerance, freedom, creativity, and activism that has spurred cultural change on a national, and sometimes even international, scale. He brings to life the long line of famous nonconformists who have collided there, collaborating, fusing and feuding, developing the ideas and creating the art that forever altered societal norms. In these pages, geniuses are made and destroyed, careers are launched, and revolutions are born. Poe, Whitman, Cather, Baldwin, Kerouac, Mailer, Ginsberg, O'Neill, Pollock, La Guardia, Koch, Hendrix, and Dylan all come together across the ages, at a cultural crossroads the likes of which we may never see again. From Dutch farmers and Washington Square patricians to slaves and bohemians, from Prohibition-era speakeasies to Stonewall, from Abstract Expressionism to AIDS, and from the Triangle Shirtwaist fire to today's upscale condos and four-star restaurants, the connecting narratives of The Village tell the fresh and unforgettable story of America itself."@en
  • "Along with documentary research, the author conducted interviews with a number of current or past Villagers, including: filmmaker John Waters, who first hitchhiked to the Village from Baltimore as a teenager in the early 1960s and moved there in 1990; Alfred Leslie, 84, the last of the original Abstract Expressionists still living and working in Manhattan, who made the Beat film Pull My Daisy with Kerouac, Ginsberg and others; Tish, an 88-year-old female impersonator who has lived in the same apartment in the Village since 1955; the late Suze Rotolo, Dylan's first girlfriend in the Village who appears with him on the iconic cover of The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan; rock photographer Bob Gruen, who befriended John Lennon during his Village years; Sharon Blythe, daughter of the late Art D'Lugoff who founded the legendary Village Gate; avant-garde filmmaker and archivist Jonas Mekas, who came to New York from Lithuania in the late 1940s and quickly fell in with the crowd that included Maya Deren and Anais Nin; musician and composer David Amram, who became friends with Kerouac in the Village of the mid-1950s and still gigs there in his eighties; native Villagers who grew up in its now greatly diminished Irish and Italian working-class enclaves in the 1940s and 1950s; several playwrights who originated the Off-Off-Broadway movement at the Village's Caffe Cino and Judson Church; George Tabb, a punk rocker and writer who grew up in the 1970s Village of the Village People and The Rocky Horror Picture Show midnight screenings; Randy Wicker, a pioneering gay rights activist several years before the Stonewall Riots; veterans of the riots and the gay pride movement that followed them; and younger Villagers who watched its transformation in the 1990s and 2000s."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "History"@en
  • "History"
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "The village 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues, a history of Greenwich Village"@en
  • "The village 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues, a history of Greenwich Village"
  • "The Village : 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues : a history of Greenwich Village"@en
  • "The Village : 400 years of Beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues : a history of Greenwich Village"@en
  • "The village : 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues, a history of Greenwich Village"@en
  • "Village : 400 Years of Beats and Bohemians, Radicals and Rogues - A History of Greenwich Village"@en
  • "Village : 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues, a history of greenwich"
  • "The village : 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues ; a history of Greenwich Village"
  • "The village : 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues : a history of Greenwich Village"
  • "The village 400 years of beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues, a history of greenwich village"@en
  • "The Village : 400 years of Beats and bohemians, radicals and rogues : A history of Greenwich Village"