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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1191655

Edward Albee

Prostitution ring of suburban housewives lead to murder. But, life and their lifestyle go on without missing a beat.

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http://schema.org/about

http://schema.org/alternateName

  • "Tiny Alice"
  • "Fragments / Edward Albee"
  • "Goat, or who is Sylvia?"@en
  • "Seascape"
  • "At home at the zoo"@en
  • "Marriage play"
  • "Everything in the garden"
  • "Everything in the garden"@en
  • "Who is Sylvia?"@en
  • "Play about the baby"
  • "Lady from Dubuque"
  • "Fragments"

http://schema.org/description

  • "Prostitution ring of suburban housewives lead to murder. But, life and their lifestyle go on without missing a beat."@en
  • "The Plymouth Theatre, Theater 1968, Richard Barr, Clinton Wilder presents Barbara Bel Geddes, Barry Nelson, Beatrice Straight in Edward Albee's "Everything in the Garden," from the play by Giles Cooper, with Robert Moore, Charles Baxter, Whitfield Connor, Augusta Dabney, Diana Douglas, James Karen, Richard Thomas, Mary K. Wells, setting and costumes by William Ritman, lighting by Tharon Musser, directed by Peter Glenville."@en
  • "In George Oppenheimer's words: "As always with Mr. Albee there is a theme beneath the surface, in this case the corruption of money and the rottenness of this bigoted exurbia where conformity to its illiberal standards and its hypocritical show of respectability is all that counts. The scene is the suburban home of Jenny and Richard, played by Barbara Bel Geddes and Barry Nelson. The only thing that seems to stand in the way of their happiness is a lack of money. The action starts in an entertaining comedy of manners style. Then abruptly there enters a Mrs. Toothe in the menacing and fascinating person of Beatrice Straight who offers Jenny the opportunity to make more money than they have ever had, to buy a greenhouse and all the other luxuries that they require for their garden and their lives. Richard's realization that their newfound money is being earned by his wife's whoring comes almost simultaneously with the return of their fourteen-year-old son from school and a champagne cocktail party which they are giving to impress their country club friends. As a result, his horror, disgust and rage has to be kept under wraps in order to keep up essential appearances until tragedy strikes, and Richard realizes that the assembled wives are all involved and their husbands are aware and condoning." More than that, they are prepared not merely to justify but defend the ends through which their means are attained--and the devastated Richard, left in agonized despair by the ironic events that charge the final moments of the play, must face the fact of his own share in their communal gift."
  • ""The Goat is about a profoundly unsettling subject, which for the record is not bestiality but the irrational, confounding, and convention-thwarting nature of love... Albee still asks questions that no other major American dramatist dares to ask."--New York times."@en
  • "Play is a literate and eloquent rumination on evolution and the meaning of life."
  • "Jack comes home from a middling day at the office to quickly announce to his wife, Gillian, that he is leaving her. Suspecting for some time a midlife crisis, Gillian goads Jack about this announcement, forcing him to try it again--going outside and coming in again--twice! Jack wants his wife, whom he still loves, to really understand his fears and the reasons he must leave her. His days seem unknown to him; his secretary of fifteen years is a total stranger; his sex is by rote. Gillian understands but feels the investment of a thirty-year marriage is worth holding on to because so much is in place, and quite frankly, they've been through these changes before: affairs, neglect, sections of time forgotten. Jack accuses Gillian of not listening, an accusation she easily returns, and when Jack then does start to leave, Gillian blocks him and a small battle ensues. Retreating to their corners, both recount memorable points in their marriage and lives, and discovering that through it all, nothing is really enough. As the lights fade, they prepare for a departure but don't make a move."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Domestic drama"@en
  • "Collections"@en
  • "Plays"
  • "Criticism, interpretation, etc"@en
  • "Acting scripts"@en
  • "Theater programs"@en
  • "Drama"@en
  • "Drama"

http://schema.org/name

  • "Everything in the garden : a play, from the play by Giles Cooper"
  • "Edward Albee's the play about the baby"
  • "Everything in the Garden : A play"
  • "Edward Albee"@en
  • "Everything in the garden : a play from the play by Giles Cooper"
  • "Everything in the garden : a ply by Edward Albee from the play by Giles Cooper"@en
  • "Edward Albee's The play about the baby"@en
  • "Edward Albee's Seascape : a play in two acts"
  • "Everything in the garden"
  • "Everything in the garden"@en
  • "Everything in the garden. a play"
  • "Edward Albee's Everything in the garden : from the play by Giles Cooper"
  • "Edward Albee's Marriage play"@en
  • "Edward Albee's Marriage play"
  • "Edward Albee's At home at the zoo"@en
  • "Edward Albee's The goat, or, Who is Sylvia? : (notes toward a definition of tragedy)"@en
  • "Everything in the garden : a play"
  • "Everything in the garden : a play"@en
  • "Edward Albee's Fragments : a sit-around"
  • "Edward Albee's The lady from Dubuque"
  • "The goat, or, Who is Sylvia? (notes toward a definition tragedy)"
  • "Everything in the Garden : from the Play by Giles Cooper"
  • "Edward Albee's fragments, a sit-around"
  • "Edward Albee's Everything in the garden"@en
  • "Everything in the garden : from the play by Giles Cooper/Edward Albee"
  • "Edward Albee's Tiny Alice"
  • "Everything in the garden, [playbill]"@en
  • "Everything in the garden : from the play by Giles Cooper"

http://schema.org/workExample