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Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression

From Back Cover: In this balanced evaluation of the Hoover Administration and its efforts to deal with the domestic problems of the Great Depression, Harris Gaylord Warren cuts through the myths that surround a crucial and insufficiently understood period of the American political history. He outlines the conditions that produced the depression, and the political and economic philosophy that underlay Hoover's actions. Although sharply critical of Hoover's lack of vision, he demonstrates that in many ways Hoover has been unfairly judged. For, Mr. Warren notes Hoover, "the Great Humanitarian, the Great Engineer, the Great Secretary," was the embodiment of an idea, a legendary ideal, a portrait of intentions and not a picture of realities." Mr. Warren traces the early career of Herbert Hoover and his heritage of normalcy. He describes his solid achievements, the fight against public power, and the tariff battle. In the chapters on the depression, he deals with the economic steps taken, the farm relief effort, Hoover's opposition to direct federal aid to the unemployed, and Prohibition. Finally, he analyzes the particular political, social, and economic issues of 1932. Mr. Warren writes in a fresh style that makes the events of the period both clear and immediate.

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  • "From Back Cover: In this balanced evaluation of the Hoover Administration and its efforts to deal with the domestic problems of the Great Depression, Harris Gaylord Warren cuts through the myths that surround a crucial and insufficiently understood period of the American political history. He outlines the conditions that produced the depression, and the political and economic philosophy that underlay Hoover's actions. Although sharply critical of Hoover's lack of vision, he demonstrates that in many ways Hoover has been unfairly judged. For, Mr. Warren notes Hoover, "the Great Humanitarian, the Great Engineer, the Great Secretary," was the embodiment of an idea, a legendary ideal, a portrait of intentions and not a picture of realities." Mr. Warren traces the early career of Herbert Hoover and his heritage of normalcy. He describes his solid achievements, the fight against public power, and the tariff battle. In the chapters on the depression, he deals with the economic steps taken, the farm relief effort, Hoover's opposition to direct federal aid to the unemployed, and Prohibition. Finally, he analyzes the particular political, social, and economic issues of 1932. Mr. Warren writes in a fresh style that makes the events of the period both clear and immediate."@en

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  • "Herbert Hoover and the Great depression"
  • "Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression"
  • "Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression"@en
  • "Herbert Hoover and the great depression"
  • "Herbert Hoover and the great depression"@en