WorldCat Linked Data Explorer

http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1367197595

Frustrated lewis pairs II : expanding the scope

Until recently, our understanding of the chemistry resulting from the combination of Lewis acids and bases had not evolved much since Lewis' time. In large part, the formation of Lewis acid-base adducts drew little interest as these systems were, with a few notable exceptions, perceived as thermodynamic sinks. However, in 2006 we learned that certain combinations of Lewis acids and Lewis bases could co-exist in solution and provide the possibility of new, synergistic reactions in which both reagents participate in the activation of H2. This "archetypical" reaction was first demonstrated with Lewis pairs in which adduct formation was sterically frustrated. Subsequently we learned that such "frustrated Lewis pairs" (FLPs) could also be derived from weak electronic attractions between the acid and base and that this notion was not limited to group 13/15 combinations. The discovery of this seemingly simple concept led to the unprecedented application of FLPs in metal-free catalytic hydrogenations. Although the early developments were summarized in our 2010 review in Angewandte Chemie, the area has grown rapidly since then. Indeed, a number of creative and insightful contributions have broadened the range of FLP systems and have led to dramatic developments, including the activation of a variety of small molecules such as alkenes, alkynes, CO₂, N₂O, and NO, among others. Theoretical studies have provided insight and understanding of this evolving area and exciting applications of FLPs in synthetic chemistry and catalysis continue to emerge. These two volumes are a compilation of state-of-the-art research concerning "FLPs" as of mid-2012. Over 20 researchers from around the globe have contributed chapters, detailing their inventive and astute contributions to this new and exciting area of chemistry. Their work covers a broad range of studies including synthetic chemistry, theoretical treatments, spectroscopic examinations, and catalytic applications. The breadth demonstrates the broad impact this work has had and, furthermore, points to the enormous potential for the future. It has been our great pleasure to have acted as editors for these volumes. It is our hope that this collection will not only highlight the amazing growth of this area in only a few years but also influence others to take up the task of exploring or exploiting FLPs in their own chemistry. Toronto, ON, Canada Douglas W. Stephan -- Preface.

Open All Close All

http://schema.org/description

  • "Frustrated Lewis Pairs: From Dihydrogen Activation to Asymmetric Catalysis, by Dianjun Chen, Jürgen Klankermayer Coexistence of Lewis Acid and Base Functions: A Generalized View of the Frustrated Lewis Pair Concept with Novel Implications for Reactivity, by Heinz Berke, Yanfeng Jiang, Xianghua Yang, Chunfang Jiang, Subrata Chakraborty, Anne Landwehr New Organoboranes in "Frustrated Lewis Pair" Chemistry, by Zhenpin Lu, Hongyan Ye, Huadong Wang Paracyclophane Derivatives in Frustrated Lewis Pair Chemistry, by Lutz Greb, Jan Paradies Novel Al-Based FLP Systems, by Werner Uhl, Ernst-Ulrich Würthwein N-Heterocyclic Carbenes in FLP Chemistry, by Eugene L. Kolychev, Eileen Theuergarten, Matthias Tamm Carbon-Based Frustrated Lewis Pairs, by Shabana Khan, Manuel Alcarazo Selective C-H Activations Using Frustrated Lewis Pairs. Applications in Organic Synthesis, by Paul Knochel, Konstantin Karaghiosoff, Sophia Manolikakes FLP-Mediated Activations and Reductions of CO2 and CO, by Andrew E. Ashley, Dermot O'Hare Radical Frustrated Lewis Pairs, by Timothy H. Warren and Gerhard Erker Polymerization by Classical and Frustrated Lewis Pairs, by Eugene Y.-X. Chen Frustrated Lewis Pairs Beyond the Main Group: Transition Metal-Containing Systems, by D. Wass Reactions of Phosphine-Boranes and Related Frustrated Lewis Pairs with Transition Metal Complexes, by Abderrahmane Amgoune, Ghenwa Bouhadir, Didier Bourissou."
  • "Until recently, our understanding of the chemistry resulting from the combination of Lewis acids and bases had not evolved much since Lewis' time. In large part, the formation of Lewis acid-base adducts drew little interest as these systems were, with a few notable exceptions, perceived as thermodynamic sinks. However, in 2006 we learned that certain combinations of Lewis acids and Lewis bases could co-exist in solution and provide the possibility of new, synergistic reactions in which both reagents participate in the activation of H2. This "archetypical" reaction was first demonstrated with Lewis pairs in which adduct formation was sterically frustrated. Subsequently we learned that such "frustrated Lewis pairs" (FLPs) could also be derived from weak electronic attractions between the acid and base and that this notion was not limited to group 13/15 combinations. The discovery of this seemingly simple concept led to the unprecedented application of FLPs in metal-free catalytic hydrogenations. Although the early developments were summarized in our 2010 review in Angewandte Chemie, the area has grown rapidly since then. Indeed, a number of creative and insightful contributions have broadened the range of FLP systems and have led to dramatic developments, including the activation of a variety of small molecules such as alkenes, alkynes, CO₂, N₂O, and NO, among others. Theoretical studies have provided insight and understanding of this evolving area and exciting applications of FLPs in synthetic chemistry and catalysis continue to emerge. These two volumes are a compilation of state-of-the-art research concerning "FLPs" as of mid-2012. Over 20 researchers from around the globe have contributed chapters, detailing their inventive and astute contributions to this new and exciting area of chemistry. Their work covers a broad range of studies including synthetic chemistry, theoretical treatments, spectroscopic examinations, and catalytic applications. The breadth demonstrates the broad impact this work has had and, furthermore, points to the enormous potential for the future. It has been our great pleasure to have acted as editors for these volumes. It is our hope that this collection will not only highlight the amazing growth of this area in only a few years but also influence others to take up the task of exploring or exploiting FLPs in their own chemistry. Toronto, ON, Canada Douglas W. Stephan -- Preface."@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Frustrated Lewis pairs. 2, Expanding the scope"
  • "Frustrated lewis pairs II : expanding the scope"@en
  • "Frustrated Lewis Pairs. II, Expanding the scope"
  • "Frustrated Lewis pairs. II, Expanding the scope"