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Inferno

This new critical edition, including Mark Musa's classic translation, provides students with a clear, readable verse translation accompanied by ten innovative interpretations of Dante's masterpiece.

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http://schema.org/alternateName

  • "Dante's inferno"@en
  • "Dante's vision"@en
  • "Inferno"@en
  • "Inferno"
  • "Dante's Inferno in modern English"@en

http://schema.org/description

  • "This new critical edition, including Mark Musa's classic translation, provides students with a clear, readable verse translation accompanied by ten innovative interpretations of Dante's masterpiece."@en
  • "Donated by Wendy Larson."@en
  • "This translation and the extensive notes (approximately one-half of the book) are meant to reach more than the interested reader, this work is meant to reach a new generation, the generation of video gamers who play the video game "Dante's Inferno.""@en
  • "Renowned painter and printmaker Sandow Birk and writer Marcus Sanders offer their own interpretations of "Dante's Inferno.""
  • "A dramatic portrait of Dante Gabriel Rossetti which portrays the public actions and private hell of the London Italian."
  • ""The first part of Dante Alighieri's 14th-century epic poem Divine Comedy. It is followed by Purgatorio and Paradiso. It is an allegory telling of the journey of Dante through Hell, guided by the Roman poet Virgil. In the poem, Hell is depicted as nine circles of suffering located within the Earth. Allegorically, the Divine Comedy represents the journey of the soul towards God, with the Inferno describing the recognition and rejection of sin.""@en
  • "A modern translation with the city of Los Angeles being cast as Hell."@en
  • "This translation uses the Longfellow translation as a base, but replaces the obscure or antiquated verbiage with the language of Modern English. This translation could easily be read and understood by today's reader."@en
  • "Inferno is a poem conveying Dante's fictional travels with his guide the poet Virgil through the nine circles of Hell. Dante explains the moral lessons he learns in the circles of Hell's sins including Limbo, Lust, Gluttony, Greed, Anger, Heresy, Violence, Fraud, Treachery. This is part one of a three-part story, followed by Purgatorio, and by Paradiso."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Poetry"@en
  • "Poetry"
  • "Ink stamps (Provenance)"@en
  • "Miniature books (Printing)"
  • "Large type books"@en
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Pictorial works"@en
  • "Pictorial cloth bindings"@en
  • "Specimens"
  • "Specimens"@en
  • "Comic books, strips, etc"@en
  • "Engravings"@en
  • "Illustrated works"@en
  • "Translations"@en
  • "Translations"

http://schema.org/name

  • "Inferno"@en
  • "Inferno"
  • "Dante's inferno"@en
  • "Dante's inferno"
  • "[Dante's inferno]"@en
  • "Dantes Inferno"
  • "Dantes inferno"@en
  • "Dante's Inferno"
  • "Dante's Inferno"@en
  • "Dante's inferno [condensed]"@en
  • "Dante's Inferno. [Translated in verse by Edward Wilberforce.]"@en
  • "Dante's Inferno : [Purgatorio, Paradiso]"

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