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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/140354064

Liberia : An Uncivil War

"In Liberia, the summer of 2003 was pure insanity: two armies are in the final battle of a decade-long civil war, holding the capital under siege while thousands die from mortar shells launched from afar. As the soldiers, mostly teenagers, fight a bloody urban battle, the nation prays that American forces show up to put an end to the violence. Liberia, a country founded by freed American slaves, has a long intertwined history with America. While the rebel army, the LURD, attempts to overthrow the Liberian government, President Charles Taylor and his army maintain a strong grip on the city."

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  • ""In Liberia, the summer of 2003 was pure insanity: two armies are in the final battle of a decade-long civil war, holding the capital under siege while thousands die from mortar shells launched from afar. As the soldiers, mostly teenagers, fight a bloody urban battle, the nation prays that American forces show up to put an end to the violence. Liberia, a country founded by freed American slaves, has a long intertwined history with America. While the rebel army, the LURD, attempts to overthrow the Liberian government, President Charles Taylor and his army maintain a strong grip on the city.""@en
  • ""Provides an in-depth case study of one of the many brutal civil wars that have sprung up like wild fires across Africa. It is an exciting example of war-time journalism--harrowing reporting with bullets ricocheting just feet from the camera--placed in a historical context stretching back nearly two hundred years. Reporter Jonathan Stack is besieged in the Liberian capital of Monrovia where President Charles Taylor says he will not leave until peacekeepers are in place. Taylor is remarkably equable for a man who has been indicted on 17 counts of crimes against humanity by the United Nations. James Brabazon is embedded with The LURD (Liberians United For Reconcilation and Democracy) who have pledged to pillage the country until President Taylor leaves. Brabazon introduces us to the General Cobra, Col. Black Diamond and soldiers, slightly more than children, who eat their victims' hearts in the belief it will make them stronger. August 5th 2003 - with the rebels at the bridges leading to Monrovia, the Nigerians are at last persuaded to sent 750 peacekeepers and the U.N. soon follows with 14,000. But what remians in the viewer's mind is President Bush's empty promises of help during the darkest days of Liberia's civil war."--Container."@en
  • "Liberia: An Uncivil War provides an in-depth case study of one of the many brutal civil wars which have sprung up like wild fires across Africa. It is an exciting example of war-time journalism - white knuckles reporting with bullets ricocheting just feet from the camera placed in a historical context stretching back nearly two hundred years. Liberia can uniquely claim to be 'made in America' and has always looked to the U.S. in its times of crisis. Reporter Jonathan Stack is besieged in the Liberian capital of Monrovia where President Charles Taylor says he will not leave until peacekeepers are in place. He is remarkably equable for a man who has just been indicted on 17 counts of crimes against humanity by the United Nations. James Barbazon is 'embedded' with the LURD (Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy) who have pledged to pillage the country until President Taylor leaves. He introduces us to General Cobra, Col. Black Diamond and soldiers, slightly more than children, who eat their victims hearts in the belief it will make them stronger. With the rebels at the bridges leading to Monrovia the Nigerians are at last persuaded to send 750 peacekeepers and the U.N. follows soon with 14,000. But what remains in the viewers' mind is President Bush's empty promises of help during the darkest days of Liberia's civil war. "I strongly recommend that all persons interested in bringing peace and security to places of conflict in Africa see this film." - Abou Moussa, Officer in Charge U.N. Mission in Liberia "Liberia has always been America's stepchild, an inconvenient reminder of slavery. This film shows how American inaction and indifference prolonged the suffering of that nation to the breaking point. It asks when will Liberia achieve the dream of liberty and independence in which it was conceived." - Salih Booker, Africa Action. "This is an educational, engaging documentary that I strongly recommend for every student, scholar, and human rights advocate to gain deeper insight into the decades long conflict in Liberia and its wider implications for West Africa." - Charles Jackson, exiled Liberian journalist and Knight Fellow Stanford University. "This outstanding documentary is a noble and praiseworthy undertaking...I enthusiastically give my highest recommendation to this painstaking piece of work. The producers and all involved with making this film should be praised for their courage and resolve. The film gives a deep exploration of the civil war on a personal level and on a global level". - Michael Coffta, Bloomsburg University, EMRO. "Recommended for high schools, colleges, and adults who want to get a better understanding of the conflict within Dafur." - Esmerelda Kale, Northwestern University, EMRO."@en
  • "An up-close look at the violent battle to oust Liberia's leader Charles Taylor, and an unforgettable tableau about a country and people on the verge of implosion."@en
  • "From container: "In the summer of 2003, Liberia, America's oldest African ally, is in total chaos. Stunning in its access and images, LIBERIA: AN UNCIVIL WAR offers a compelling behind-the-scenes account of the internecine military conflict that destroye."
  • "An up-close look at the violent battle to oust Liberia's leader Charles Taylor, and an unforgettable tableau about a country and people on the verge of implosion. Includes the never-before-seen Farewell Speech by President Charles Taylor."@en
  • ""Provides an in-depth case study of one of the many brutal civil wars that have sprung up like wild fires across Africa. It is an exciting example of war-time journalism--harrowing reporting with bullets ricocheting just feet from the camera--placed in a historical context stretching back nearly two hundred years. Reporter Jonathan Stack is besieged in the Liberian capital of Monrovia where President Charles Taylor says he will not leave until peacekeepers are in place. Taylor is remarkably equable for a man who has been indicted on 17 counts of crimes against humanity by the United Nations. James Brabazon is embedded with The LURD (Liberians United For Reconcilation and Democracy) who have pledged to pillage the country until President Taylor leaves. Brabazon introduces us to the General Cobra, Col. Black Diamond, and soldiers, slightly more than children, who eat their victims' hearts in the belief it will make them stronger. August 5th 2003 - with the rebels at the bridges leading to Monrovia, the Nigerians are at last persuaded to sent 750 peacekeepers and the U.N. soon follows with 14,000. But what remians in the viewer's mind is President Bush's empty promises of help during the darkest days of Liberia's civil war."--Container."@en
  • ""Provides an in-depth case study of one of the many brutal civil wars that have sprung up like wild fires across Africa. It is an exciting example of war-time journalism--harrowing reporting with bullets ricocheting just feet from the camera--placed in a historical context stretching back nearly two hundred years. Reporter Jonathan Stack is besieged in the Liberian capital of Monrovia where President Charles Taylor says he will not leave until peacekeepers are in place. Taylor is remarkably equable for a man who has been indicted on 17 counts of crimes against humanity by the United Nations. James Barbazon is embedded with The LURD (Liberians United For Reconcilation and Democracy) who have pledged to pillage the country until President Taylor leaves. Brabazon introduces us to the General Cobra, Col. Black Diamond and soldiers, slightly more than children, who eat their victims' hearts in the belief it will make them stronger. August 5th 2003 - with the rebels at the bridges leading to Monrovia, the Nigerians are at last persuaded to sent 750 peacekeepers and the U.N. soon follows with 14.000. But what remians in the viewer's mind is President Bush's empty promises of help during the darkest days of Liberia's civil war."--Container."@en
  • ""In Liberia, the summer of 2003 was pure insanity when a rebel army attempted to overthrow a government run by an indicted war criminal. Two armies engaged in the final battle of a decade long civil war. Hundreds of innocent civilians died from mortar shells launched from afar and thousands more suffered hunger while the soldiers, mostly teenagers, kept the capital city under siege. Tonight's Cutting Edge investigates one of the many brutal civil wars that were being raged across Africa. Liberia: An Uncivil War follows reporters, Jonathan Stack and James Brabazon as they investigated the power struggle between the rebel movement LURD (Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy) and President Charles Taylor as it reached its climax with the imminent capture of Liberian capital Monrovia in the summer of 2003. While Stack followed the besieged government, Brabazon entrenched himself with rebels as they advance on Monrovia. (From the US, in English) M (V,A) CC WS " -- SBS website."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Nonfiction films"@en
  • "History"@en
  • "Documentary films"@en
  • "Feature films"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Liberia : an uncivil war"
  • "Liberia : An Uncivil War"@en
  • "Liberia an uncivil war"
  • "Liberia an uncivil war"@en
  • "Liberia, an uncivil war"@en