WorldCat Linked Data Explorer

http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1430848968

Jeeves and the wedding bells

Bertie Wooster (a young man about town) and his butler Jeeves (the very model of the modern manservant)'return in their first new novel in nearly forty years: Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks. P.G. Wodehouse documented the lives of the inimitable Jeeves and Wooster for nearly sixty years, from their first appearance in 1915 ("Extricating Young Gussie") to his final completed novel (Aunts Aren't Gentlemen) in 1974. These two were the finest creations of a novelist widely proclaimed to be the finest comic English writer by critics and fans alike. Now, forty years later, Bertie and Jeeves return in a hilarious affair of mix-ups and mishaps. With the approval of the Wodehouse estate, acclaimed novelist Sebastian Faulks brings these two back to life for their legion of fans. Bertie, nursing a bit of heartbreak over the recent engagement of one Georgina Meadowes to someone not named Wooster, agrees to "help" his old friend Peregrine "Woody" Beeching, whose own romance is foundering. That this means an outing to Dorset, away from an impending visit from Aunt Agatha, is merely an extra benefit. Almost immediately, things go awry and the simple plan quickly becomes complicated. Jeeves ends up impersonating one Lord Etringham, while Bertie pretends to be Jeeves' manservant "Wilberforce,"'and this all happens under the same roof as the now affianced Ms. Meadowes. From there the plot becomes even more hilarious and convoluted, in a brilliantly conceived, seamlessly written comic work worthy of the master himself. A Kirkus Reviews Best Fiction Book of 2013.

Open All Close All

http://schema.org/about

http://schema.org/description

  • "One B. Wooster, recently returned from a very pleasurable sojourn in Cannes, finds himself at the stately home of Sir Henry Hackwood in Dorset. Bertie is more than familiar with the country house set-up: he is a veteran of the cocktail hour and, thanks to Jeeves, his gentleman's personal gentleman, is never less than immaculately dressed. On this occasion, however, it is Jeeves who is to be seen in the drawing room while Bertie finds himself below stairs--a role for which he has no discernable talent and a situation he doesn't much like. The root cause of this role reversal is love. Bertie, you see, has met one Georgiana Meadowes on the Cote d'Azur. However, Georgiana is spoken for. Meanwhile, Peregrine 'Woody' Beeching, one of Bertie's oldest chums, is desperate to regain the trust of his fiancee Amelia, Sir Henry's tennis-mad daughter, and has approached Bertie--well, Jeeves, actually--for help. But why would this necessitate Bertie having to pass himself off as a servant when he has never so much as made a cup of tea? Could it be that the ever loyal, Spinoza-loving Jeeves has something up his sleeve?"
  • "P.G. Wodehouse documented the lives of the inimitable Jeeves and Wooster for nearly sixty years. These two were the most popular creations of a novelist widely proclaimed to be the finest comic English writer by critics and fans alike. Now, forty years later, Bertie and Jeeves return in a hilarious affair of mix-ups and mishaps, in a brilliantly conceived, seamlessly written comic work worthy of the master himself."
  • "Bertie Wooster (a young man about town) and his butler Jeeves (the very model of the modern manservant)--return in their first new novel in nearly forty years: Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks. P.G. Wodehouse documented the lives of the inimitable Jeeves and Wooster for nearly sixty years, from their first appearance in 1915 ("Extricating Young Gussie") to the his final completed novel (Aunts Aren't Gentlemen) in 1974. These two were the finest creations of a novelist widely proclaimed to be the finest comic English writer by critics and fans alike. With the approval of the Wodehouse estate, acclaimed novelist Sebastian Faulks brings Bertie and Jeeves back to life in a hilarious affair of mix-ups and mishaps. Bertie, nursing a bit of heartbreak over the recent engagement of one Georgiana Meadowes to someone not named Wooster, agrees to "help" his old friend Peregrine "Woody" Beeching, whose own romance is foundering. Almost immediately, things go awry and the simple plan quickly becomes complicated. Jeeves ends up having to impersonate one Lord Etringham, while Bertie plays the part of Jeeves' manservant "Wilberforce"--and this all happens under the same roof as the now affianced Ms. Meadowes. From there the plot becomes even more hilarious and convoluted, in a brilliantly conceived, seamlessly written comic work worthy of the master himself."
  • "Bertie Wooster (a young man about town) and his butler Jeeves (the very model of the modern manservant)'return in their first new novel in nearly forty years: Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks. P.G. Wodehouse documented the lives of the inimitable Jeeves and Wooster for nearly sixty years, from their first appearance in 1915 ("Extricating Young Gussie") to his final completed novel (Aunts Aren't Gentlemen) in 1974. These two were the finest creations of a novelist widely proclaimed to be the finest comic English writer by critics and fans alike. Now, forty years later, Bertie and Jeeves return in a hilarious affair of mix-ups and mishaps. With the approval of the Wodehouse estate, acclaimed novelist Sebastian Faulks brings these two back to life for their legion of fans. Bertie, nursing a bit of heartbreak over the recent engagement of one Georgina Meadowes to someone not named Wooster, agrees to "help" his old friend Peregrine "Woody" Beeching, whose own romance is foundering. That this means an outing to Dorset, away from an impending visit from Aunt Agatha, is merely an extra benefit. Almost immediately, things go awry and the simple plan quickly becomes complicated. Jeeves ends up impersonating one Lord Etringham, while Bertie pretends to be Jeeves' manservant "Wilberforce,"'and this all happens under the same roof as the now affianced Ms. Meadowes. From there the plot becomes even more hilarious and convoluted, in a brilliantly conceived, seamlessly written comic work worthy of the master himself. A Kirkus Reviews Best Fiction Book of 2013."@en
  • "When young man about town Bertie Wooster, nursing a broken heart, agrees to help his friend Peregrine "Woody" Beeching, whose own romance is failing, hilarity and chaos ensue as Jeeves steps in to save Bertie from himself."@en
  • ""Bertie Wooster (a young man about town) and his butler Jeeves (the very model of the modern manservant)--return in their first new novel in nearly forty years: Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks. P.G. Wodehouse documented the lives of the inimitable Jeeves and Wooster for nearly sixty years, from their first appearance in 1915 ("Extricating Young Gussie") to the his final completed novel (Aunts Aren't Gentlemen) in 1974. These two were the finest creations of a novelist widely proclaimed to be the finest comic English writer by critics and fans alike. With the approval of the Wodehouse estate, acclaimed novelist Sebastian Faulks brings Bertie and Jeeves back to life in a hilarious affair of mix-ups and mishaps. Bertie, nursing a bit of heartbreak over the recent engagement of one Georgiana Meadowes to someone not named Wooster, agrees to "help" his old friend Peregrine "Woody" Beeching, whose own romance is foundering. Almost immediately, things go awry and the simple plan quickly becomes complicated. Jeeves ends up having to impersonate one Lord Etringham, while Bertie plays the part of Jeeves' manservant "Wilberforce"--and this all happens under the same roof as the now affianced Ms. Meadowes. From there the plot becomes even more hilarious and convoluted, in a brilliantly conceived, seamlessly written comic work worthy of the master himself"--"
  • ""Bertie Wooster and his butler Jeeves --return in their first new novel in nearly forty years P.G. Wodehouse, is a novelist widely proclaimed to be the finest comic English writer by critics and fans alike. With the approval of the Wodehouse estate, acclaimed novelist Sebastian Faulks brings Bertie and Jeeves back to life in a hilarious affair of mix-ups and mishaps."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Audiobooks"@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Love stories"
  • "Large type books"@en
  • "Large type books"
  • "Humorous stories"@en
  • "Historical fiction"
  • "Historical fiction"@en
  • "Humorous fiction"
  • "Humorous fiction"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Jeeves and the wedding bells"
  • "Jeeves and the wedding bells"@en
  • "Jeeves and the wedding bells : an homage to P.G. Wodehouse"@en
  • "Jeeves and the Wedding Bells"@en
  • "Jeeves and the wedding bells : a homage to P.G. Wodehouse"
  • "Jeeves and the wedding bells a homage to P.G.Wodehouse"
  • "Jeeves and the wedding bells : an homage to P.G. Wode House"