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Anna Karenina : a novel in eight parts

The novel begins with the charming but shallow Moscow bureaucrat, Stiva Oblonsky, discovered by his wife Dolly in one of a string of infidelities. Tolstoy thus immediately establishes the dominant concerns of his work: marriage, family life, and adultery. When Stiva's beautiful sister, Anna Karenina, visits the Oblonsky household to mend its broken tranquillity, she meets the dashing bachelor-officer, Count Vronsky, who is expected to propose marriage to Dolly Oblonsky's younger sister Kitty. Instead, Vronsky falls under Anna's spell, first at her arrival at the train station and then at an elegant ball where Madame Karenina, wife of a distinguished bureaucrat and loving mother of an eight-year-old son, is temporarily transcended by the other Anna: a glamorous, sexually magnetic woman with a frustrated hunger for passion. When Anna flees her barely awakened feelings by returning to her settled life in Saint Petersburg, Vronsky pursues her on the same train and confesses his love to her. Anne struggles to deny her reciprocal ardor and forces herself to play the dutiful wife to her frigid and dull husband. Nevertheless, when Vronsky loses a brilliantly narrated steeplechase race, the watching Anna--and her observing husband--both know that she loves him. After some stormy scenes, she decides to live openly with Vronsky, and they leave Russia for an Italian "honeymoon" and then attempt to settle down on one country estate after another. Vronsky must, however, abandon his cavalry career and Anna her high position in society. While Tolstoy celebrates her grace, integrity, and courage in defying the dictates of a hypocritical community that sanctions affairs but forbids broken marriages, he also condemns her to deteriorations of mood and mind as her increased dependency on Vronsky makes her irrationally jealous and possessive. Eventually, the destructiveness of her passion and ostracism by respectable society drive Anna to suicide.

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  • "A new translation of Leo Tolstoy's novel "Anna Karenina", in which a woman of fine nature forsakes her husband for a lover, and after a bitter experience commits suicide."
  • "The novel begins with the charming but shallow Moscow bureaucrat, Stiva Oblonsky, discovered by his wife Dolly in one of a string of infidelities. Tolstoy thus immediately establishes the dominant concerns of his work: marriage, family life, and adultery. When Stiva's beautiful sister, Anna Karenina, visits the Oblonsky household to mend its broken tranquillity, she meets the dashing bachelor-officer, Count Vronsky, who is expected to propose marriage to Dolly Oblonsky's younger sister Kitty. Instead, Vronsky falls under Anna's spell, first at her arrival at the train station and then at an elegant ball where Madame Karenina, wife of a distinguished bureaucrat and loving mother of an eight-year-old son, is temporarily transcended by the other Anna: a glamorous, sexually magnetic woman with a frustrated hunger for passion. When Anna flees her barely awakened feelings by returning to her settled life in Saint Petersburg, Vronsky pursues her on the same train and confesses his love to her. Anne struggles to deny her reciprocal ardor and forces herself to play the dutiful wife to her frigid and dull husband. Nevertheless, when Vronsky loses a brilliantly narrated steeplechase race, the watching Anna--and her observing husband--both know that she loves him. After some stormy scenes, she decides to live openly with Vronsky, and they leave Russia for an Italian "honeymoon" and then attempt to settle down on one country estate after another. Vronsky must, however, abandon his cavalry career and Anna her high position in society. While Tolstoy celebrates her grace, integrity, and courage in defying the dictates of a hypocritical community that sanctions affairs but forbids broken marriages, he also condemns her to deteriorations of mood and mind as her increased dependency on Vronsky makes her irrationally jealous and possessive. Eventually, the destructiveness of her passion and ostracism by respectable society drive Anna to suicide."@en
  • "Contemporary fiction. Anna Karenina seems to have everything - beauty, wealth, popularity and an adored son. But she feels that her life is empty until the moment she encounters the impetuous officer Count Vronsky. Their subsequent affair scandalizes society and family alike and soon brings jealously and bitterness in its wake. Contrasting with this tale of love and self-destruction is the vividly observed story of Levin, a man striving to find contentment and a meaning to his life - and also a self-portrait of Tolstoy himself."
  • "This is perhaps Tolstoy's most perfect definiation of his artistic practice.Among the many thematic links between the two sides of the novel, the most obvious is the contrast of the happy marriage of Levin and Kitty with the tragic relations of Anna and Vronsky."@en
  • "Anna Karenina tells of the doomed love affair between the sensuous and rebellious Anna and the dashing officer, Count Vronsky. Tragedy unfolds as Anna rejects her passionless marriage and must endure the hypocrisies of society. Set against a vast and richly textured canvas of nineteenth-century Russia, the novel's seven major characters create a dynamic imbalance, playing out the contrasts of city and country life and all the variations on love and family happiness. While previous versions have softened the robust, and sometimes shocking, quality of Tolstoy's writing, Pevear and Volokhonsky have produced a translation true to his powerful voice. This award-winning team's authoritative edition also includes an illuminating introduction and explanatory notes. Beautiful, vigorous, and eminently readable, this Anna Karenina will be the definitive text for generations to come."
  • "Anna Karenina tells of the doomed love affair between the sensuous and rebellious Anna and the dashing officer, Count Vronsky. Tragedy unfolds as Anna rejects her passionless marriage and must endure the hypocrisies of society. Set against a vast and richly textured canvas of nineteenth-century Russia, the novel's seven major characters create a dynamic imbalance, playing out the contrasts of city and country life and all the variations on love and family happiness. While previous versions have softened the robust, and sometimes shocking, quality of Tolstoy's writing, Pevear and Volokhonsky have produced a translation true to his powerful voice. This award-winning team's authoritative edition also includes an illuminating introduction and explanatory notes. Beautiful, vigorous, and eminently readable, this Anna Karenina will be the definitive text for generations to come."@en
  • "Anna Karenina has beauty, social position, wealth, a husband, and an adored son, but her existence seems empty. When she meets the dashing officer Copunt Vronsky she rejects her marriage and turns to him to fulfill her passionate nature - with devastating results. One of the world's greatest novels, Anna Karenina is both an immortal drama of personal conflict and social scandal and a vivid, richly textured panorama of nineteenth-century Russia. While previous versions have softened the robust, and sometimes shocking, quality of Tolstoy's writing, Pevear and Volokhonsky have produced a magnificent translation that is true to his powerful voice. This award-winning teams authoritative edition also includes an illuminating introduction, a list of principal characters, suggestions for further reading, and full explanatory notes."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Juvenile works"@en
  • "Translations"
  • "History"@en
  • "Romans (teksten)"
  • "Uncorrected proofs (Printing)"
  • "Fiction"
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Love stories"
  • "Love stories"@en
  • "Didactic fiction"
  • "Didactic fiction"@en
  • "Powieść rosyjska"
  • "Historical fiction"
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Anna Karenina : a novel in eight parts"@en
  • "Anna Karenina : a novel in eight parts"
  • "Anna Karenina (film tie-in) : a novel in eight parts"
  • "Anna Karenin"
  • "Anna Karenina : A Novel in Eight Parts"
  • "Anna Karenina, a novel in eight parts/translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky"@en
  • "Anna Karenina : by Leo Tolstoy. Translated from the Russian by Constance Garnett. Illus. by Fritz Eichenberg"@en
  • "Anna Karenina a novel in eight parts"@en
  • "Anna Karenina a novel in eight parts"
  • "Anna Karenina"
  • "Anna Karenina"@en
  • "Anna Karenina : a Novel in Eight Parts"

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