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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1785114250

Someone

An ordinary life--its sharp pains and unexpected joys, its bursts of clarity and moments of confusion--lived by an ordinary woman: this is the subject of Someone, Alice McDermott's extraordinary return, seven years after the publication of After This. Scattered recollections-- of childhood, adolescence, motherhood, old age--come together in this transformative narrative, stitched into a vibrant whole by McDermott's deft, lyrical voice.

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  • "An ordinary life--its sharp pains and unexpected joys, its bursts of clarity and moments of confusion--lived by an ordinary woman: this is the subject of Someone, Alice McDermott's extraordinary return, seven years after the publication of After This. Scattered recollections-- of childhood, adolescence, motherhood, old age--come together in this transformative narrative, stitched into a vibrant whole by McDermott's deft, lyrical voice."@en
  • "The story of a Brooklyn-born woman's life - her family, her neighborhood, her daily trials and triumphs, from childhood to old age. Our first glimpse of Marie is as a child: a girl in glasses waiting on a Brooklyn stoop for her beloved father to come home from work. Then moves on to Marie's first heartbreak and her eventual marriage; her brother's brief stint as a Catholic priest, subsequent loss of faith, and eventual breakdown; the Second World War; her parents' deaths; the births and lives of Marie's children; the changing world of her Irish-American enclave in Brooklyn."
  • "Someone begins on the stoop of a Brooklyn apartment building where Marie is waiting for her father to come home from work. It is the 1920s and in her Irish-American enclave the stories of her neighbours unfold before her short-sighted eyes. There is war-blinded Billy Corrigan and foolish, ill-fated Pegeen - and her parents' legendary Syrian-Irish marriage - the terrifying Big Lucy, and the ever-present Sisters of Charity from the convent down the road. As the years pass Marie's own history plays out against the backdrop of a chan."@en
  • "The story of Marie Commeford as a child, her neighborhood, her daily trials and triumphs - from childhood to old age."
  • ""The story of a Brooklyn-born woman's life - her family, her neighborhood, her daily trials and triumphs - from childhood to old age"--Provided by the publisher."@en
  • ""The story of a Brooklyn-born woman's life - her family, her neighborhood, her daily trials and triumphs - from childhood to old age"--Provided by the publisher."
  • "A fully realized portrait of one woman's life in all its complexity, by the National Book Award?winning author An ordinary life?its sharp pains and unexpected joys, its bursts of clarity and moments of confusion?lived by an ordinary woman: this is the subject of Someone , Alice McDermott's extraordinary return, seven years after the publication of After This . Scattered recollections?of childhood, adolescence, motherhood, old age?come together in this transformative narrative, stitched into a vibrant whole by McDermott's deft, lyrical voice. Our first glimpse of Marie is as a child: a girl in glasses waiting on a Brooklyn stoop for her beloved father to come home from work. A seemingly innocuous encounter with a young woman named Pegeen sets the bittersweet tone of this remarkable novel. Pegeen describes herself as an "amadan," a fool; indeed, soon after her chat with Marie, Pegeen tumbles down her own basement stairs. The magic of McDermott's novel lies in how it reveals us all as fools for this or that, in one way or another. Marie's first heartbreak and her eventual marriage; her brother's brief stint as a Catholic priest, subsequent loss of faith, and eventual breakdown; the Second World War; her parents' deaths; the births and lives of Marie's children; the changing world of her Irish-American enclave in Brooklyn?McDermott sketches all of it with sympathy and insight. This is a novel that speaks of life as it is daily lived; a crowning achievement by one of the finest American writers at work today."@en
  • "An ordinary life'its sharp pains and unexpected joys, its bursts of clarity and moments of confusion'lived by an ordinary woman: this is the subject of Someone, Alice McDermott's extraordinary return, seven years after the publication of After This. Scattered recollections' of childhood, adolescence, motherhood, old age'come together in this transformative narrative, stitched into a vibrant whole by McDermott's deft, lyrical voice. Our first glimpse of Marie is as a child: a girl in glasses waiting on a Brooklyn stoop for her beloved father to come home from work. A seemingly innocuous encounter with a young woman named Pegeen sets the bittersweet tone of this remarkable novel. She describes herself as an "amadan," a fool; indeed, soon after her chat with Marie, Pegeen tumbles down her own basement stairs. The magic of McDermott'snovel lies in how it reveals us all as fools for this or that, in one way or another. Marie's first heartbreak and her eventual marriage; her brother's brief stint as a Catholic priest, subsequent loss of faith and eventual breakdown; the Second World War; her parents' deaths; the births and lives of Marie's children; the changing world of her Irish-American enclave in Brooklyn'McDermott sketches all of it with sympathy and insight."@en
  • "A fully realized portrait of one woman's life in all its complexity, by the National Book Award'winning author An ordinary life'its sharp pains and unexpected joys, its bursts of clarity and moments of confusion'lived by an ordinary woman: this is the subject of Someone, Alice McDermott's extraordinary return, seven years after the publication of After This. Scattered recollections'of childhood, adolescence, motherhood, old age'come together in this transformative narrative, stitched into a vibrant whole by McDermott's deft, lyrical voice. Our first glimpse of Marie is as a child: a girl in glasses waiting on a Brooklyn stoop for her beloved father to come home from work. A seemingly innocuous encounter with a young woman named Pegeen sets the bittersweet tone of this remarkable novel. Pegeen describes herself as an "amadan," a fool; indeed, soon after her chat with Marie, Pegeen tumbles down her own basement stairs. The magic of McDermott's novel lies in how it reveals us all as fools for this or that, in one way or another. Marie's first heartbreak and her eventual marriage; her brother's brief stint as a Catholic priest, subsequent loss of faith, and eventual breakdown; the Second World War; her parents' deaths; the births and lives of Marie's children; the changing world of her Irish-American enclave in Brooklyn'McDermott sketches all of it with sympathy and insight. This is a novel that speaks of life as it is daily lived; a crowning achievement by one of the finest American writers at work today. A Publishers Weekly Best Fiction Book of the Year A Kirkus Reviews Best Fiction Book of 2013 A New York Times Notable Book of 2013 A Washington Post Notable Fiction Book of 2013 An NPR Best Book of 2013."@en
  • "One life: its pains and joys; its bursts of clarity and moments of confusion. Scattered recollections -- of childhood, of sexual awakenings, of motherhood, and of old age -- come together in this story of an unremarkable woman's unforgettable life. We first meet Marie Commeford as a child, observing her pre-Depression world from a Brooklyn stoop. An innocuous encounter with a young neighbor named Pegeen Chehab establishes the novel's bittersweet refrain. Pegeen calls herself an "amadan," a fool. The events that follow reveal us all to be fools and dreamers, blinded in one way or another by hope or loss or the exigencies of life and love."
  • "In her 1920s Irish-American enclave, the stories of Marie's neighbours unfold before her short-sighted eyes - from war-blinded Billy Corrigan, to the terrifying Big Lucy, to the ever-present Sisters of Charity from the convent down the road. As the years pass, Marie's own story unfolds against the backdrop of a changing world. Her older brother Gabe leaves for the seminary to study for the priesthood, his faith destined to be tested to breaking point. Marie experiences first love and first heartbreak, marriage and motherhood, and discovers how time can both take away and offer up so much that is precious. Stitching together the intricate tapestry of Marie's journey of the heart over seven decades, Alice McDermott reveals the delicate, bittersweet beauty that lies behind someone's - EVERYONE'S - experiences of loss, love and life."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "History"@en
  • "Domestic fiction"
  • "Domestic fiction"@en
  • "Bildungsromans"@en
  • "Bildungsromans"
  • "Historical fiction"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Large type books"
  • "Large type books"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Someone"@en
  • "Someone"
  • "Someone a novel"@en