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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/179269633

A Lucky Child a Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy.

At the age of ten Thomas Buergenthal arrived at Auschwitz after surviving the Ghetto of Kielce and two labour camps, and was soon separated from his parents. Using his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck, he managed to survive until he was liberated from Sachsenhausen in 1945. After experiencing the turmoil of Europe's post-war years - from the Battle of Berlin, to a Jewish orphanage in Poland - Buergenthal went to America in the 1950s at the age of seventeen. He eventually became one of the world's leading experts on international law and human rights. His story of survival and his deter.

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  • "Thomas Buergenthal, now a Judge in the International Court of Justice in The Hague, tells his astonishing experiences as a young boy in his memoir A LUCKY CHILD. He arrived at Auschwitz at age 10 after surviving two ghettos and a labor camp. Separated first from his mother and then his father, Buergenthal managed by his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck to survive on his own. Almost two years after his liberation, Buergenthal was miraculously reunited with his mother and in 1951 arrived in the U.S. to start a new life. Now dedicated to helping those subjected to tyranny throughout the world, Buergenthal writes his story with a simple clarity that highlights the stark details of unimaginable hardship. A LUCKY CHILD is a book that demands to be read by all."
  • "Thomas Buergenthal is a judge at the International Court in The Hague who was rescued from the death camps of Auschwitz at the age of eleven by Soviet and Polish troops. These memoirs present the story of his extraordinary journey - from the horrors of Nazism to an investigation of modern day genocide."
  • "At the age of ten Thomas Buergenthal arrived at Auschwitz after surviving the Ghetto of Kielce and two labour camps, and was soon separated from his parents. Using his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck, he managed to survive until he was liberated from Sachsenhausen in 1945. After experiencing the turmoil of Europe's post-war years - from the Battle of Berlin, to a Jewish orphanage in Poland - Buergenthal went to America in the 1950s at the age of seventeen. He eventually became one of the world's leading experts on international law and human rights. His story of survival and his deter."@en
  • "Thomas Buergenthal, now a Judge in the International Court of Justice in The Hague, tells his astonishing experiences as a young boy in his memoir. Arriving at Auschwitz at age 10 after surviving two ghettos and a labor camp, he became separated first from his mother and then his father but managed by his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck to survive on his own. Almost two years after his liberation, Buergenthal was miraculously reunited with his mother and in 1951 arrived in the U.S. to start a new life."
  • "Thomas Buergenthal, now a Judge in the International Court of Justice in The Hague, tells his astonishing experiences as a young boy in his memoir. Arriving at Auschwitz at age 10 after surviving two ghettos and a labor camp, he became separated first from his mother and then his father but managed by his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck to survive on his own. Almost two years after his liberation, Buergenthal was miraculously reunited with his mother and in 1951 arrived in the U.S. to start a new life."@en
  • ""Thomas Buergenthal was not quite six years old when he and his parents were forced into a Jewish ghetto in Poland. Four years later, they were placed on a train bound for Auschwitz, where Thomas was separated from his family. Alone, ten-year-old Thomas managed by his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck to survuvwe Auschwitz and the infamous death march. Filled with the stirring and true insights of a child, this acclaimed memoir conveys the sheer force of will and determination that even the youngest victims of the Holocaust evinced. From teaching himself to ride a bike belonging to an SS officer to sneaking a heavenly sip of milk, Buergenthal demonstrates that beauty can abide in the face of the greatest adversity. A lucky child is a compelling reminder of the power of grace and the resilience of the human spirit."--p. [4] of cover."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Personal narratives"@en
  • "Personal narratives"
  • "Biography"
  • "Biography"@en
  • "Electronic books."
  • "Electronic books."@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "A Lucky Child a Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy."@en
  • "A Lucky Child A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy /"
  • "A lucky child : a memoir of surviving Auschwitz as a young boy /"
  • "A lucky child : a memoir of surviving Auschwitz as a young boy /"@en
  • "A lucky child : a memoir of surviving Auschwitz as a young boy /"@en
  • "A lucky child a memoir of surviving Auschwitz as a young boy /"
  • "A lucky child a memoir of surviving Auschwitz as a young boy /"@en