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Hampole super Psalterium

A codex of 102 leaves with another manuscript (a gathering of eight additional leaves) later bound to it. The original codex contains the Latin Psalter of Richard Rolle of Hampole, including the prologue, the epilogue, and Rolle's commentaries on the Canticles, together running from p. 1-200 [i.e. 201]. Note that the commentary at certain passages, especially for the later Psalms, is markedly different from the Cologne edition of 1536 and some manuscripts. As is typical of the manuscript tradition, Rolle's Latin Psalter is followed by the Canticum Psalmorum of pseudo-Augustine of Hippo at pp. 200-201 [i.e. 201-202] (cf. Stegmüller 369). This work appears to be related to, but distinct from, the De Laude Psalmorum that is now attributed by some scholars to Alcuin. The last three pages, p. 201-203 [i.e. 202-204], present a short treatise on the Seven Deadly Sins. Possibly corresponding to the incipit in Bloomfield, 5901, this incomplete work describes only five: de speciebus superbiae, invidiae, irae, accidiae, and avaritiae. The appended gathering, starting at p. 204 [i.e. 205], bears a title in the upper margin, added later in the 15th century: "Speculum p[e]cc[at]oris s[ecundu]m Augustinu[m]." However, what follows is a collection of short texts falsely attributed to Augustine: the Tractatus de Miseria Hominis starting at p. 204 [i.e. 205], Sermon 104 starting at p. 212 [i.e. 213] (cf. PL, 39, cols. 1946-1949), and then finally the Speculum Peccatoris itself, starting at p. 214 [i.e. 215] (cf. PL, 40, cols. 983-992). On the last leaf verso are several distinct inscriptions, all written in a cursiva of the later 15th century, in at least two hands. The first inscription, of 17 lines, is the prologue to the Psalms Commentary of Peter Lombard (cf. PL, 191, cols. 55A-B). The next inscription, of four lines and written in the same hand, is a passage from the De Gradibus Humilitatis et Superbiae of Bernard of Clairvaux (cf. PL, 182, cols. 966A-B). The third inscription, also in the same hand and written in a single line, is a paraphrase of a maxim found in the De Conversione ad Clericos of Bernard of Clairvaux (cf. PL, 182, col. 855A). Written in a different hand in four lines, the next inscription serves as an exhortation to right conduct in a monastery, identifying different sections of a monastery with the four creatures of the Gospels. The final inscription, written in the same hand as the previous one, is of four lines and is attributed to Anselm of Canterbury (cf. PL, 158, cols. 730C-731A).

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  • "A codex of 102 leaves with another manuscript (a gathering of eight additional leaves) later bound to it. The original codex contains the Latin Psalter of Richard Rolle of Hampole, including the prologue, the epilogue, and Rolle's commentaries on the Canticles, together running from p. 1-200 [i.e. 201]. Note that the commentary at certain passages, especially for the later Psalms, is markedly different from the Cologne edition of 1536 and some manuscripts. As is typical of the manuscript tradition, Rolle's Latin Psalter is followed by the Canticum Psalmorum of pseudo-Augustine of Hippo at pp. 200-201 [i.e. 201-202] (cf. Stegmüller 369). This work appears to be related to, but distinct from, the De Laude Psalmorum that is now attributed by some scholars to Alcuin. The last three pages, p. 201-203 [i.e. 202-204], present a short treatise on the Seven Deadly Sins. Possibly corresponding to the incipit in Bloomfield, 5901, this incomplete work describes only five: de speciebus superbiae, invidiae, irae, accidiae, and avaritiae. The appended gathering, starting at p. 204 [i.e. 205], bears a title in the upper margin, added later in the 15th century: "Speculum p[e]cc[at]oris s[ecundu]m Augustinu[m]." However, what follows is a collection of short texts falsely attributed to Augustine: the Tractatus de Miseria Hominis starting at p. 204 [i.e. 205], Sermon 104 starting at p. 212 [i.e. 213] (cf. PL, 39, cols. 1946-1949), and then finally the Speculum Peccatoris itself, starting at p. 214 [i.e. 215] (cf. PL, 40, cols. 983-992). On the last leaf verso are several distinct inscriptions, all written in a cursiva of the later 15th century, in at least two hands. The first inscription, of 17 lines, is the prologue to the Psalms Commentary of Peter Lombard (cf. PL, 191, cols. 55A-B). The next inscription, of four lines and written in the same hand, is a passage from the De Gradibus Humilitatis et Superbiae of Bernard of Clairvaux (cf. PL, 182, cols. 966A-B). The third inscription, also in the same hand and written in a single line, is a paraphrase of a maxim found in the De Conversione ad Clericos of Bernard of Clairvaux (cf. PL, 182, col. 855A). Written in a different hand in four lines, the next inscription serves as an exhortation to right conduct in a monastery, identifying different sections of a monastery with the four creatures of the Gospels. The final inscription, written in the same hand as the previous one, is of four lines and is attributed to Anselm of Canterbury (cf. PL, 158, cols. 730C-731A)."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Specimens"@en
  • "Commentaries"@en
  • "Early works."@en
  • "Early works"@en
  • "Gothic scripts."@en
  • "Marginalia (Provenance)"@en
  • "Specimens."@en
  • "Commentaries."@en
  • "Illuminated manuscripts"@en
  • "Manuscripts"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Hampole super Psalterium"@en
  • "[Latin Psalter]"@en