WorldCat Linked Data Explorer

http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1823833750

Metamorphoses

""The Metamorphoses of Ovid offers to the modern world such a key to the literary and religious culture of the ancients that it becomes an important event when at last a good poet comes up with a translation into English verse."" -John Crowe Ransom""... a charming and expert English version, which is right in tone for the Metamorphoses."" -Francis Fergusson""This new Ovid, fresh and faithful, is right for our time and should help to restore a great reputation."" -Mark Van DorenThe first and still the best modern verse translation of the Metamorphose

Open All Close All

http://schema.org/description

  • """The Metamorphoses of Ovid offers to the modern world such a key to the literary and religious culture of the ancients that it becomes an important event when at last a good poet comes up with a translation into English verse."" -John Crowe Ransom""... a charming and expert English version, which is right in tone for the Metamorphoses."" -Francis Fergusson""This new Ovid, fresh and faithful, is right for our time and should help to restore a great reputation."" -Mark Van DorenThe first and still the best modern verse translation of the Metamorphose"@en
  • ""Ovid is, after Homer, the single most important source for classical mythology. The Metamorphoses, which he wrote over the six-year period leading up to his exile from Rome in 8 a.d., is the primary source for over two hundred classical legends that survived to the twenty-first century. Many of the most familiar classical myths, including the stories of Apollo and Daphne and Pyramus and Thisbe, come directly from Ovid. The Metamorphoses is a twelve-thousand-line poem, written in dactylic hexameters and arranged loosely in chronological order from the beginning of the universe's creation to the Augustan Rome of Ovid's own time. The major theme of the Metamorphoses, as the title suggests, is metamorphosis, or change. Throughout the fifteen books making up the Metamorphoses, the idea of change is pervasive. Gods are continually transforming their own selves and shapes, as well as the shapes and beings of humans. The theme of power is also ever-present in Ovid's work. The gods as depicted by the Roman poets are wrathful, vengeful, capricious creatures who are forever turning their powers against weaker mortals and half-mortals, especially females. Ovid's own situation as a poet who was exiled because of Augustus's capriciousness is thought by many to be reflected in his depictions of the relationships between the gods and humans."--Http://www.enotes.com/metamorphoses-of-ovid (Jan. 24, 2011.)."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Electronic books."@en
  • "Poetry"@en
  • "Libros electronicos."@en
  • "Translations."@en
  • "Translations."
  • "Poetry."@en
  • "Poetry."
  • "Livres électroniques."
  • "Translations"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Metamorphoses"
  • "Metamorphoses"@en
  • "Metamorphoses. /"@en
  • "Metamorphoses,"@en
  • "Metamorphoses [Ovid]."@en
  • "Metamorphoses /"@en
  • "Metamorphoses /"
  • "Metamorphoses."@en
  • "Les métamorphoses /"