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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1835447306

Decoration and Display in Rome's Imperial Thermae: Messages of Power and their Popular Reception at the Baths of Caracalla

Throughout, this dissertation aims to provide a novel interpretative framework with which to consider issues of patronage, infrastructure, and the resultant experience of daily life in ancient Rome. Although focused on baths, it is hoped that this framework will inspire further research into experiential aspects of Roman architecture and urbanism.

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  • "Throughout, this dissertation aims to provide a novel interpretative framework with which to consider issues of patronage, infrastructure, and the resultant experience of daily life in ancient Rome. Although focused on baths, it is hoped that this framework will inspire further research into experiential aspects of Roman architecture and urbanism."@en
  • "This dissertation analyzes the extensive decoration of the best preserved of these complexes, the Baths of Caracalla (inaugurated 216 C.E.). This decoration was a carefully strategized ensemble, meant to impart a particular message to a diverse Roman audience. I examine the subtext of this sumptuous display, addressing the visual experience of the baths and elucidating the decoration's critical role in articulating innuendo and advancing imperial agendas. The case studies addressed herein, ranging from architectural to freestanding sculpture and mosaic, demonstrate that endowing monumental baths was a concern of dynastic legitimacy and imperial largess, and that decorative programs articulated these themes by consistently drawing analogies between the subjects of the decoration and the emperor who had paid for it. Decorative choices were by no means incidental, but rather purposeful decisions by Caracalla and his architect to honor the emperor and to consolidate his power and reputation."@en
  • "Throughout the Roman Empire, bathing was a highlight of the day and a major social event. Ubiquitous literary and epigraphical evidence conveys the significance of baths to people's daily routines and relationships. In fact, baths were so valued that their patronage became a powerful public relations tool and greatly enhanced one's popular and political clout. It is hardly surprising, then, that as a spectacular gift to the people, the emperors commissioned eight magnificent baths in the city of Rome between 25 BCE - 337 CE. While these baths, the so-called imperial thermae, have been the subject of extensive scholarship in terms of architectural design and construction, the lived experience of these luxurious spaces warrants much closer attention. This dissertation fills the need for a critical study that brings the lived and visual experience of Roman baths into dialogue with the original appearance of the monuments themselves, as well as the underlying ambitions of imperial patrons."@en

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  • "Dissertations, Academic"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Decoration and Display in Rome's Imperial Thermae: Messages of Power and their Popular Reception at the Baths of Caracalla"@en