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The Divine Comedy. Text with translation in the metre of the original by Geoffrey L. Bickersteth. (New edition ... revised.)

An epic poem, completed in 1321, in which the poet describes his visionary spiritual journey through Hell, Purgatory and Paradise--guided first by the classical poet Virgil and then by his beloved Beatrice--which results in a purification of his religious faith.

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  • "[Divina commendia, ital. u.engl.] The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri"
  • "Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri"
  • "Dante"
  • "Dante"@en
  • "Divina commedia, ital.u.engl"
  • "Dante's Divine Comedy"
  • "Hell"@en
  • "Cliffs notes : Dante's inferno"
  • "Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri (1867)"
  • "Vision of Dante"
  • "Dante's divine comedy, inferno"
  • "Paradiso"@en
  • "Paradiso"
  • "Great books"
  • "Dante's divine comedy Longfellow's translation"
  • "Inferno incipit comoedia Dantis Alagherii"
  • "Dante's divine comedy"
  • "Cliff notes : Dante's inferno"
  • "Paradise"@en
  • "Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri"@en
  • "Divina commedia. English"@en
  • "Canterbury tales"
  • "Cliff notes : the divine comedy"
  • "Dante's padiso"
  • "Troilus and Criseyde"
  • "La Divina Commedia"
  • "Divina commedia <engl.&gt"
  • "Dante's inferno"
  • "Dante. Chaucer"
  • "Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso : the Divine comedy"
  • "Divina commedia"@en
  • "Great books of the western world"
  • "Translation of Dante's Divina commedia by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, with bibliographical and critical notes"
  • "Comedia di Dante Alighieri"@en
  • "Comedia di Dante Alighieri"
  • "Dante's Divine comedy"
  • "Divine Comedy"@en
  • "Purgatory"@en
  • "Dante's paradiso"
  • "California Dante"
  • "Cliffs notes : the inferno"
  • "Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri;, The"
  • "Dante's Inferno"
  • "Dante's Inferno"@en
  • "Longfellow's Dante"
  • "Dante's Paradiso"
  • "Paradiso the divine comedy"
  • "Divine comedy"
  • "Divine comedy"@en
  • "Divine of [sic] comedy"@en
  • "Works"
  • "Cliff's notes on Dante's Divine Comedy, Inferno"
  • "Inferno"@en
  • "Inferno"
  • "Purgatorio"@en
  • "Purgatorio"

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  • "An epic poem, completed in 1321, in which the poet describes his visionary spiritual journey through Hell, Purgatory and Paradise--guided first by the classical poet Virgil and then by his beloved Beatrice--which results in a purification of his religious faith."@en
  • "An invaluable source of pleasure to those English readers who wish to read this great medieval classic with true understanding, Sinclair's three-volume prose translation of Dante's Divine Comedy provides both the original Italian text and the Sinclair translation, arranged on facing pages, and commentaries, appearing after each canto, which serve as brilliant examples of genuine literary criticism."@en
  • "'Inferno' depicts a cruel underworld in which desperate figures are condemned to eternal damnation for committing one or more of seven deadly sins. As he descends through the nine concentric circles of increasingly agonising torture, Dante encounters doomed souls from history and his own time."
  • "Vol 3: Paradiso completes Durling's masterful rendering of the Divine Comedy. Durling's earlier translations of the Inferno and the Purgatorio garnered high praise, and with this superb version of the Paradiso readers can now traverse the entirety of Dante's epic poem of spiritual ascent with the guidance of one of the greatest living Italian-to-English translators. Reunited with his beloved Beatrice in the Purgatorio, in the Paradiso the poet-narrator journeys with her through the heavenly spheres and comes to know "the state of blessed souls after death." As with the previous volumes, the original Italian and its English translation appear on facing pages. Readers will be drawn to Durling's precise and vivid prose, which captures Dante's extraordinary range of expression--from the high style of divine revelation to colloquial speech, lyrical interludes, and scornful diatribes against corrupt clergy. This edition boasts several unique features. Durling's introduction explores the chief interpretive issues surrounding the Paradiso, including the nature of its allegories, the status in the poem of Dante's human body, and his relation to the mystical tradition. The notes at the end of each canto provide detailed commentary on historical, theological, and literary allusions, and unravel the obscurity and difficulties of Dante's ambitious style . An unusual feature is the inclusion of the text, translation, and commentary on one of Dante's chief models, the famous cosmological poem by Boethius that ends the third book of his Consolation of Philosophy. A substantial section of Additional Notes discusses myths, symbols, and themes that figure in all three cantiche of Dante's masterpiece. Finally, the volume includes a set of indexes that is unique in American editions, including Proper Names Discussed in the Notes (with thorough subheadings concerning related themes), Passages Cited in the Notes, and Words Discussed in the Notes, as well as an Index of Proper Names in the text and translation. Like the previous volumes, this final volume includes a rich series of illustrations by Robert Turner."
  • "This first volume of this new Divine Comedy presents the Italian text of the Inferno and, on facing pages, a new prose translation (the first in twenty-five years). Robert Durling's translation brings a new power and accuracy to the rendering of Dante's extraordinary vision of Hell, with all its terror, pathos, and sardonic humor, and its penetrating analyses of the psychology of sin and the ills that plague society. Martinez and Durling's introduction and notes are designed with the first-time reader of the poem in mind but will be useful to others as well. The concise introduction presents essential biographical and historical background and a discussion of the form of the poem. The notes are more extensive than those in most translations currently available, and they contain much new material. In addition, sixteen short essays explore the autobiographical dimension of the poem, the problematic body analogy, the question of Christ's presence in Hell, and individual cantos that have been the subject of controversy, including those on homosexuality. There is an extensive bibliography, and the four indexes (to foreign words, passages cited, proper names in the notes, and to proper names in the text and translation) will make the volume particularly useful. Robert Turner's illustrations include detailed maps of Italy, clearly labeled diagrams of the cosmos and of the structure of Hell, and line drawings illustrating objects and places mentioned in the poem."@en
  • "Dante's greatest work, an epic poem, is a Christian allegory. Drawn from ancient Roman history and Dante's contemporary Italy, this work is a compassionate, oral evaluation of human nature and a mystic vision of the Absolute toward which mankind strives."
  • "IT IS AT ONCE A VISION OF THE OTHER WORLD, AN ALLEGORY OF CHRISTIAN LIFE, A SPIRITUAL AUTOBIOGRAPHY, AND A CYCLOPAEDIC EMBODIMENT OF ALL KNOWLEDGE OF ITS DAY."
  • "This single volume, blank verse translation of The Divine Comedy includes an introduction, maps of Dante's Italy, Hell, Purgatory, Geocentric Universe, and political panorama of the thirteenth and early fourteenth century, diagrams and notes providing the reader with invaluable guidance."
  • "The second volume of Oxford's new Divine Comedy presents the Italian text of the Purgatorio and, on facing pages, a new prose translation. Continuing the story of the poet's journey through the medieval Other World under the guidance of the Roman poet Virgil, the Purgatorio culminates in the regaining of the Garden of Eden and the reunion there with the poet's long-lost love Beatrice. This new edition of the Italian text takes recent critical editions into account, and Durling's prose translation, like that of the Inferno, is unprecedented in its accuracy, eloquence, and closeness to Dante's s."@en
  • "The "Divine Comedy" was entitled by Dante himself merely "Commedia," meaning a poetic composition in a style intermediate between the sustained nobility of tragedy, and the popular tone of elegy. The word had no dramatic implication at that time, though it did involve a happy ending. The poem is the narrative of a journey down through Hell, up the mountain of Purgatory, and through the revolving heavens into the presence of God. In this aspect it belongs to the two familiar medieval literary types of the Journey and the Vision. It is also an allegory, representing under the symbolism of the stages and experiences of the journey, the history of a human soul, painfully struggling from sin through purification to the Beatific Vision."@en
  • "An introduction and notes accompany this classic epic poem about a spiritual pilgrim being led by Virgil through the nine circles of hell. This vigorous translation of Inferno reserves Dante's simple, natural style, and captures the swift movement of the original Italian verse. Mark Musa's blank verse rendition of the poet's journey through the circles of Hell re-creates for the modern reader the rich meanings that Dante's poem had for his contemporaries. Musa's introduction and commentaries on each of the cantos brilliantly illuminate the text."
  • "Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso - the three fates of the deceased become the three pillars of an epic poem. The Divine Comedy, written by Italian poet Dante Alighieri in the fourteenth century, is considered the foremost work in Italian literature. The journey begins with Dante's descent into the depths of Hell where he witnesses those eternally separated from God. Then he climbs the mountain of Purgatory where Christian souls undergo final purification, before finally touring the celestial circles of Heaven where he is filled with the image of God. An allegorical work, the comed."@en
  • ""The Divine Comedy" begins in a shadowed forest on Good Friday in the year 1300. It proceeds on a journey that, in its intense recreation of the depths and the heights of human experience, has become the key with which Western civilization has sought to unlock the mystery of its own identity. Allen Mandelbaum's astonishingly Dantean translation, which captures so much of the life of the original, renders whole for us the masterpiece of that genius whom our greatest poets have recognized as a central model for all poets. This Everyman's edition- containing in one volume all three cantos, Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso- includes an introduction by Nobel Prize- winning poet Eugenio Montale, a chronology, notes, and a bibliography. Also included are forty-two drawings selected from Botticelli's marvelous late-fifteenth-century series of illustrations."
  • "The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia, later christened "Divina" by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature. The poem's imaginative and allegorical vision of the Christian afterlife is a culmination of the medieval world-view as it had developed in the Western Church. It helped establish the Tuscan dialect in which it is written as the Italian standard.- Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia."
  • "Dante Alighieri's poetic masterpiece, The divine comedy, is a moving human drama, an unforgettable visionary journey through the infinite torment of Hell, up the arduous slopes of Purgatory, and on to the glorious realm of Paradise, the sphere of universal harmony and eternal salvation."
  • "Vol. 1: Presents the Italian text of the Inferno and, on facing pages, a new prose translation (the first in twenty-five years). Durling's translation brings a new power and accuracy to the rendering of Dante's extraordinary vision of Hell, with all its terror, pathos, and sardonic humor, and its penetrating analyses of the psychology of sin and the ills that plague society. Martinez and Durling's introduction and notes are designed with the first-time reader of the poem in mind but will be useful to others as well. The concise introduction presents essential biographical and historical background and a discussion of the form of the poem. The notes are more extensive than those in most translations currently available, and they contain much new material. In addition, sixteen short essays explore the autobiographical dimension of the poem, the problematic body analogy, the question of Christ's presence in Hell, and individual cantos that have been the subject of controversy, including those on homosexuality. There is an extensive bibliography, and the four indexes (to foreign words, passages cited, proper names in the notes, and to proper names in the text and translation) will make the volume particularly useful. Robert Turner's illustrations include detailed maps of Italy, clearly labeled diagrams of the cosmos and of the structure of Hell, and line drawings illustrating objects and places mentioned in the poem."
  • "The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia, later christened "Divina" by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature. The poem's imaginative and allegorical vision of the Christian afterlife is a culmination of the medieval world-view as it had developed in the Western Church. It helped establish the Tuscan dialect in which it is written as the Italian standard.-- Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia."@en
  • "Presents a translation of Dante's allegorical poem."
  • "In the Divine Comedy Dante describes his imaginary journey through Hell, Purgatory and Paradise. No other poem in any language has had such a wide appeal: the conception is so lofty, the music so beautiful and the interest of the narrative so sustained, that its importance has steadily increased."
  • "The John Ciardi translation."@en
  • "Dante Alighieri's poetic masterpiece, The Divine Comedy, is a moving human drama, an unforgettable visionary journey through the infinite torment of Hell, up the arduous slopes of Purgatory, and on to the glorious realm of Paradise'the sphere of universal harmony and eternal salvation. 10 illustrations."@en
  • "Vol. 2: Presents the Italian text of the Purgatorio and, on facing pages, a new prose translation. Continuing the story of the poet's journey through the medieval Other World under the guidance of the Roman poet Virgil, the Purgatorio culminates in the regaining of the Garden of Eden and the reunion there with the poet's long-lost love Beatrice. This new edition of the Italian text takes recent critical editions into account, and Durling's prose translation, like that of the Inferno, is unprecedented in its accuracy, eloquence, and closeness to Dante's syntax. Martinez' and Durling's notes are designed for the first-time reader of the poem but include a wealth of new material unavailable elsewhere. The extensive notes on each canto include innovative sections sketching the close relation to passages--often similarly numbered cantos--in the Inferno. Fifteen short essays explore special topics and controversial issues, including Dante's debts to Virgil and Ovid, his radical political views, his original conceptions of homosexuality, of moral growth, and of eschatology. As in the Inferno, there is an extensive bibliography and four useful indexes. Robert Turner's illustrations include maps, diagrams of Purgatory and the cosmos, and line drawings of objects and places mentioned in the poem."
  • "The most celebrated work of Dante is the Divine comedy--a vision of hell, purgatory and heaven that provides a strangely surrealistic view of medieval attitudes on religious dogma and the price of disobedience."@en
  • "An introduction and notes accompany this classic epic poem about a spiritual pilgrim being led by Virgil through the nine circles of hell."
  • "Includes INFERNO, PURGATORIO, and PARADISO."
  • "This epic poem is Dante's major work and his masterpiece. It has one hundred cantos in Terza Rima, divided equally (after an introductory canto in the first section) into three sections of thirty-three cantos each and consists of the Inferno, the Purgatorio, and the Paradiso. In structure Dante's "journey" is a description of the Beyond - an allegory of the progress of the individual soul toward God and the progress of political and social mankind toward peace on earth. However, the poet's inclusion and vivid potraiture of personal friends and enemies, admist the characters from ancient Roman and recent and contemporary Italian history, and the constant allusions to human affairs, make the work a realistic picture and intensely involved analysis of every aspect of earthly human life."@en
  • "Dante Alighieri's epic poem travels through the endless agony of Hell, up the treacherous slopes of Purgatory, and on to the wondrous kingdom of Paradise--the realm of universal unity and eternal salvation."@en
  • "In middle age Dante realizes he has strayed from the True Way into the Dark Wood of Error, or Wordliness. When he realizes his loss, he looks up to see the first light of the sun, the symbol of divine illumination, lighting the top of a small hill, the Mount of Joy. It is Easter, the time of resurrection and rebirth. These symbols fill Dante with hope and he sets out immediately to climb to the top of Mount Joy. His way is blocked, however, by the Three Beasts of Worldliness--the Leopard of Malice and Fraud, the Lion of violence and ambition, and the She-Wolf of Incntinence--who will drive him back into the darkness of error. When all seems lost, Virgil, Dante's symbol of human reason, to lead him from error. With the easy way to the Mount of Joy blacked, Dante must travel the more difficult way through Hell and Purgatory before reaching the light of God. To help him, Virgil offers Dante another Guide--Beatrice, the symbol of divine love."@en
  • "Copies 1 and 2 in circulation."@en
  • ""'The Divine Comedy' begins in a shadowed forest on Good Friday in the year 1300. It proceeds on a journey that, in its intense recreation of the depths and the heights of human experience, has become the key with which Western civilization has sought to unlock the mystery of its own identity. Allen Mandelbaum's astonishingly Dantean translation, which captures so much of the life of the original, renders whole for us the masterpiece that genius whom our greatest poets have recognized as a central model for all poets. This Everyman's edition -- containing in one volume all three cantos, 'Inferno, ' 'Purgatorio, ' and 'Paradiso' -- includes an introduction by Nobel Prize-winning poet Eugenio Montale, a chronology, notes, and a bibliography. Also included are forty-two drawings selected from Botticelli's marvelous late-fifteenth century series of illustrations." ***"An epic poem in which the poet describes his spiritual journey through Hell, Purgatory and Paradise -- guided first by the poet Virgil and then by his beloved Beatrice -- which results in a purification of his religious faith.""@en
  • "The story of a man's way through the torment of Hell in search for Paradise."
  • "Clive James presents the crowning achievement of his career: a monumental translation of Dante's Divine Comedy. The Divine Comedy is the precursor of modern literature, and Clive James' new translation - his life's work and decades in the making - presents Dante's entire epic poem in a single song. While many poets and translators have attempted to capture the full glory of The Divine Comedy in English, many have fallen short. Victorian verse translations established an unfortunate tradition of reproducing the sprightly rhyming measures of Dante but at the same time betraying the strain on the translator's powers of invention. For Dante, the dramatic human stories of Hell were exciting, but the spiritual studies of Purgatory and the sublime panoramas of Heaven were no less so. In this incantatory new translation, James - defying the convention by writing in quatrains - tackles these problems head-on and creates a striking and hugely accessible translation that gives us The Divine Comedy as a whole, unified, and dramatic work."
  • "An allegorical poem in which Dante, lost in a dark and frightening wood, meets the poet Virgil who offers to conduct him through hell, purgatory, and paradise. Dante describes the various regions of hell, the ascent to purgatory, and the beauty of heaven."@en
  • "An invaluable source of pleasure to those English readers who wish to read this great medieval classic with true understanding, Sinclair's three-volume prose translation of Dante's Divine Comedy provides both the original Italian text and the Sinclair translation, arranged on facing pages, and commentaries, appearing after each canto, which serve as brilliant examples of genuine literary criticism. This volume contains the complete translation of Dante's Purgatorio."@en
  • "Presents a translation of Renaissance poet Dante Alighieri's story of a man making his way through the torment of Hell in search of Paradise; and includes chronology of the author's life and works, historical context, explanatory notes, critical excerpts, discussion questions, and a list resources."
  • ""In the Inferno, the first of the Comedy's three parts, Dante is conducted by the spirit of the classical poet Virgil through the nine circles of Hell on the initial stage of his arduous journey toward God."--Jacket."@en
  • ""In the Inferno, the first of the Comedy's three parts, Dante is conducted by the spirit of the classical poet Virgil through the nine circles of Hell on the initial stage of his arduous journey toward God."--Jacket."
  • "This timeless Christian allegory has become the key with which Western civilization has sought to unlock the mystery fo its own identity. In the Inferno, the first of the Comedy's three parts, Dante is conducted by the spirit of the classical poet Virgil through the nine circles of Hell on the initial stage of his arduous journey toward God."@en
  • "This first volume of this new Divine Comedy presents the Italian text of the Inferno and, on facing pages, a new prose translation (the first in twenty-five years). The editor's translation brings a new power and accuracy to the rendering of Dante's extraordinary vision of Hell, with all its terror, pathos, and sardonic humor, and its penetrating analyses of the psychology of sin and the ills that plague society. The introduction and notes are designed with the first-time reader of the poem in mind but will be useful to others as well. The concise introduction presents essential biographical and historical background and a discussion of the form of the poem. The notes are more extensive than those in most translations currently available, and they contain much new material. In addition, sixteen short essays explore the autobiographical dimension of the poem, the problematic body analogy, the question of Christ's presence in Hell, and individual cantos that have been the subject of controversy, including those on homosexuality. There is an extensive bibliography, and the four indexes (to foreign words, passages cited, proper names in the notes, and to proper names in the text and translation). Illustrations include detailed maps of Italy, clearly labeled diagrams of the cosmos and of the structure of Hell, and line drawings illustrating objects and places mentioned in the poem."
  • "This poetic allegory takes a visual journey through the infinite torment of Hell, up the exhausting slopes of Purgatory, and on to the glorious beauty of paradise."
  • "The Inferno remains literature's most hallowed and graphic vision of Hell. In this first part of the epic The Divine Comedy, Dante is led by the poet Virgil down into the nine circles of Hell, where he travels through nightmare landscapes of fetid cesspools, viper pits, frozen lakes, and boiling rivers of blood and witnesses sinners being beaten, burned, eaten, defecated upon, and torn to pieces by demons. Along the way he meets the most fascinating characters known to the classical and medieval world -- the silver-tongued Ulysses, lustful Francesca da Rimini, the heretical Farinata degli Uberti, and scores of other intriguing and notorious figures."
  • "Dante's Divine Comedy is one of the most highly regarded works of world literature and a classic that continues to inspire fiction and poetry today. Written between 1308 and 1321, the three books of this epic poem--Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso--tell the story of the poet's personal journey through the afterlife, an odyssey that leads him from his wanderings in the spiritual wilderness to a paradise shaped by Divine love. This edition of The Divine Comedy features the classic translation of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. It also features more than one hundred engravings by Gustave Dore, long considered the greatest artist to illustrate Dante's timeless masterpiece."@en

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  • "Epic poetry"@en
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  • "Livres électroniques"
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Collections"@en
  • "Poezja angielska"
  • "Classical literature"@en
  • "Gedichten (teksten)"
  • "Gedichten (teksten)"@en
  • "Translations"
  • "Translations"@en
  • "Poezja epicka angielska"
  • "Cloth bindings (Binding)"
  • "Ausgabe"
  • "Artists' books"
  • "Criticism, interpretation, etc"@en
  • "Criticism, interpretation, etc"
  • "Large type"@en
  • "Pictorial works"
  • "Allegories"@en
  • "Allegories"
  • "History"@en
  • "History"
  • "Portraits"
  • "Portraits"@en
  • "Electronic resource"@en
  • "Literatura angielska"
  • "Ressources Internet"
  • "Annotations (Provenance)"
  • "Vertalingen (vorm)"@en
  • "Vertalingen (vorm)"
  • "Pictorial cloth bindings"
  • "Poetry"@en
  • "Poetry"
  • "Poezja włoska"
  • "Extra-illustrated copies (Provenance)"@en

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  • "The Divine Comedy. Text with translation in the metre of the original by Geoffrey L. Bickersteth. (New edition ... revised.)"@en
  • "Divine comedy [Fletcher]"
  • "The Divine comedy; the Carlyle-Wicksteed translation"@en
  • "The Divine comedy; the Carlyle-Wicksteed translation"
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : a verse translation"@en
  • "The divine comedy : Volume 1. Inferno"@en
  • "DIVINE COMEDY"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : the Carlyle-Okey-Wicksteed translation"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri"
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri"@en
  • "The divine comedy. Inferno"@en
  • "The Divine comedy the Carlyle-Okey-Wicksteed translation"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : inferno"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : inferno"
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante"
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri. Vol. 1, Inferno"@en
  • "[The Divine comedy]"@en
  • "The divine comedy of dante alighieri"
  • "Divine comedy of dante alighieri, volume 2"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : A verse translation with introductions & commentary by Allen Mandelbaum"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante"
  • "The divine comedy. --"
  • "The divine comedy = La divina commedia"@en
  • "The divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri"
  • "The divine comedy : 1-3"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : a verse translation with an introduction"@en
  • "The divine comedy. : Inferno"@en
  • "Divine comedy [trl. Ciardi]"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri a verse translation with introds. & commentary"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : [Paradiso] : a verse translation with introductions & commentary"@en
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri Inferno, a verse translation"
  • "The divine comedy : Inferno"@en
  • "The divine comedy : Inferno"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri, [v.3]"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : paradiso"
  • "Divine comedy : the Carlyle-Okey-Wickstead translation"
  • "The divine comedy. Volume 1, Inferno"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Paradiso"
  • "The Divine Comedy, Volume 2"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Inferno"@en
  • "The divine comedy. Vol.1, Inferno"@en
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, Inferno : a verse translation"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : a verse translation with introds. & commentary"@en
  • "The divine comedy translated and edited"@en
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  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri ; Paradiso"
  • "The divine comedy. Volume I, Inferno"
  • "(Divine comedy)"
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, Volume 2"@en
  • "Paradiso"@en
  • "Paradiso"
  • "The divine comedy"@es
  • "The divine comedy"
  • "The divine comedy"@en
  • "The Divine comedy the Carlyle-Wicksteed translation"@en
  • "The divine comedy. Volume I. Inferno"@en
  • "The Divine comedy. Text with translation the metre of the original by Geoffrey L. Bickersteth"@en
  • "The divine comedy. Vol. 1, Inferno"
  • "The divine comedy; translated and edited"
  • "Divine comedy = Purgatorio"
  • "The divine comedy: Inferno"
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Purgatorio"
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Purgatorio"@en
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri"
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri"@en
  • "The Divine comedy : the Carlyle-Okey-Wicksteed translation ; introd. by C.H. Grandgent ; bibliography by Ernest H. Wilkins"@en
  • "Dante's Alighieri's Divine comedy"@en
  • "Divine Comedy Volume 1: Inferno"@en
  • "The divine comedy : text with translation"@en
  • "Divine Comedy : Notes"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : the Carlyle-Wicksteed translation, introduction by Professor C.H. Grandgent"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri. [1], Inferno"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri. [1], Inferno"@en
  • "Inferno a verse translation"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighiere"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri, and the New life; ed. with introduction and revised and additional notes by L. Oscar Kuhns"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri / Purgatorio"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri [microform]"
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : the Carlyle-Okey-Wicksteed translation"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri Inferno a verse translation"
  • "[The divine comedy]"
  • "[The divine comedy]"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Inferno"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Inferno"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Inferno : a verse translation"@en
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, Inferno a verse translation"@en
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, Inferno a verse translation"
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri : a verse translation with introductions and commentary"@en
  • "The divine comedy : volume one: Inferno"@en
  • "The Divine comedy. With translation and comment by John D. Sinclair"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri Hell-Purgatory-Paradise, Translated by Henry F. Cary with Introductions and Notes"
  • "The divine comedy, Inferno"
  • "Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri"@en
  • "The divine comedy. Volume 1 Inferno"@en
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, Inferno : a verse translation with an introduction by Allen Mandelbaum"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : the Carlyle-Wickstead translation"@en
  • "Divine comedy of dante alighieri"@en
  • "Divine comedy of dante alighieri"
  • "The Divine Comedy ... Translated by the Rev. Henry F. Cary. Together with Dante Gabriel Rossetti's translation of the New Life. Edited with introduction and notes by Oscar Kuhns. [With illustrations.]"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri, [v.1]"@en
  • "The Divine comedy With translation and comment by John D. Sinclair"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri: Paradiso"@en
  • "The Divine Comedy, Vol. 1 : Inferno"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighiere"@en
  • "Divine Comedy"@en
  • "Divine Comedy"
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, Inferno : a verse translation, with an introduction by Allen Mandelbaum"@en
  • "[Divine comedy]"
  • "Dante Alighieri's Divine comedy"
  • "Dante Alighieri's Divine comedy"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Italian text with translation and comment"@en
  • "Inferno"@en
  • "Inferno"
  • "The divine comedy. Volume 1 : Inferno"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri / 1 : Inferno"
  • "The divine comedy : notes"
  • "The Divine comedy"
  • "The Divine comedy"@en
  • "The Divine comedy; The Carlyle-Wicksteed translation"
  • "The vision of Dante, a condensed presentation in rhyme of the "Divine Comedy""
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : [Longfellow's translation]"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri the Carlyle-Okey-Wicksteed translation"@en
  • "The divine comedy; translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow"
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri : inferno"@en
  • "Inferno : a verse translation"
  • "Inferno : a verse translation"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Paradiso"@en
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Paradiso"
  • "[Divine Comedy]"@en
  • "Divine Comedy. Vol. 1, Inferno"
  • "Divine comedy-inferno"
  • "The Divine comedy of Dante Alghieri"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : a verse translation"
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : a verse translation"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri a verse translation"@en
  • "The divine comedy / Dante Alighieri; With an introduction by Eugenio Montale; Transl. by Allen Mandelbaum"
  • "Inferno : a new verse translation"@en
  • "Inferno : the divine comedy"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri"
  • "The Divine Comedy"@en
  • "The Divine Comedy"
  • "The Divine Comedy"@it
  • "The divine comedy Inferno"@en
  • "The divine comedy. 1, Inferno"
  • "Dante Alighieri's Divine comedy: inferno;v.1-2"
  • "The divine comedy / Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso"
  • "The divine comedy inferno"@en
  • "Divine comedy"@en
  • "Divine comedy"
  • "The divine comedy : the Carlyle-Wicksteed translation"
  • "The divine Comedy"
  • "Dante Alighieri's divine comedy"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri, [v.2]"@en
  • "The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri : Inferno : a verse translation with introductions and commentary"@en
  • "The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri : Inferno, a verse translation"
  • "The inferno"@en
  • "The Divine comedy; the Carlyle-Okey-Wicksteed translation"

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