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The Solicitor General balancing the interests of the executive and judicial branches, 1959-1982

This dissertation shows that, while Solicitors General have traditionally operated independently of the executive branch on a day-to-day basis, the decision to pursue a case depends on the policy preferences of the administration. The government's much-touted success as a litigant reflects both the Solicitor General's ability to anticipate the demands of the Court and the Court's cooperation in meeting the needs of the executive branch. In "serving two masters," the Solicitor General acts as a highly effective mediator between the executive and judicial branches.

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  • "This dissertation shows that, while Solicitors General have traditionally operated independently of the executive branch on a day-to-day basis, the decision to pursue a case depends on the policy preferences of the administration. The government's much-touted success as a litigant reflects both the Solicitor General's ability to anticipate the demands of the Court and the Court's cooperation in meeting the needs of the executive branch. In "serving two masters," the Solicitor General acts as a highly effective mediator between the executive and judicial branches."@en
  • "The role of the Solicitor General of the United States epitomizes the tensions inherent in a system of separate and shared power. As the government's lawyer, the Solicitor General is committed to defending the interests of the executive branch before the Supreme Court. The Solicitor General is also a highly-respected officer of that court, advising the justices on points of law and regulating the flow of cases to the Court's docket. In reality, the Solicitor General serves both the executive and judicial branches, institutions whose perspectives on law and policy are different and sometimes in conflict. This dissertation considers how the Solicitor General adjusts the priorities of the executive branch to the traditions of the judicial branch."@en
  • "The dissertation examines the government's participation in Supreme Court cases decided by written opinion between 1959 and 1982. The analysis is designed to reveal whether the executive's policy agenda determines the Solicitor General's litigation agenda. Various administrations and solicitor generals are compared in terms of their success before the Court, both in gaining review and in winning victories on the merits. The analysis is multi-tiered, including not just cases in which the government was a party, but amicus participation. Transition cases, those left by one administration for resolution by a successor, and individual rights cases are also examined."@en

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  • "The solicitor general balancing the interests of the executive and judical branches, 1959-1982"
  • "The Solicitor General balancing the interests of the executive and judicial branches, 1959-1982"@en
  • "The solicitor general: balancing the interests of the executive and judicial branches, 1959-1982"@en
  • "The Solicitor general : balancing the interests of the executive and judicial branches, 1959-1982"@en
  • "The solicitor general : balancing the interests of the executive and judicial branches, 1959-1982"