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Debt : the first 5,000 years

Before there was money, there was debt Every economics textbook says the same thing: Money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems'to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history' There's not a shred of evidence to support it. Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods'that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors. Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like "guilt," "sin," and "redemption") derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it. Debt: The First 5,000 Years is a fascinating chronicle of this little known history'as well as how it has defined human history, and what it means for the credit crisis of the present day and the future of our economy. From the Hardcover edition.

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  • "Before there was money, there was debt Every economics textbook says the same thing: Money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems'to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history' There's not a shred of evidence to support it. Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods'that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors. Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like "guilt," "sin," and "redemption") derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it. Debt: The First 5,000 Years is a fascinating chronicle of this little known history'as well as how it has defined human history, and what it means for the credit crisis of the present day and the future of our economy. From the Hardcover edition."@en
  • "Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors."
  • "Debt: The First 5,000 Years is a fascinating chronicle of this little known historyùas well as how it has defined human history, and what it means for the credit crisis of the present day and the future of our economy. --Book Jacket."@en
  • "Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like "guilt," "sin," and "redemption") derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. Without knowing it, we are still fighting these battles today."
  • "Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors. --"
  • "Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom: he shows that before there was money, there was debt. For more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods-that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors."
  • "Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like "guilt," "sin," and "redemption") derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. Without knowing it, we are still fighting these battles today. --"
  • "Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like "guilt," "sin," and "redemption") derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. Without knowing it, we are still fighting these battles today."@en
  • "Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goodsùthat is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors."@en
  • "Before there was money, there was debt. Every economics textbook tells the same story: money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems - to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history? There's not a shred of evidence to support it. Here acclaimed anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for 5,000 years, since the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods - that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era that we first encounter societies divided into debtors and creditors. Ever since, arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debate from Italy to China - as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. Indeed, the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like "guilt," "sin," and "redemption") derive from these ancient and nearly forgotten debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. Without knowing it, Graeber writes, we are still fighting these battles today. -- Book Cover"
  • "De Amerikaanse antropoloog en anarchist onderzoekt de historische betekenis van het begrip 'schuld' en weerlegt de mythe dat geld werd bedacht om het oudere systeem van ruilhandel te vervangen. Hij constateert namelijk dat ruilhandel, betaling met munten en kredietsystemen met virtueel geld elkaar in de geschiedenis afwisselden. Geld werd rekeneenheid voor schulden en zo veranderde 'schuld' van een moreel begrip in een financiële term, waarmee onze samenleving werd verdeeld in schuldeisers en schuldenaars. Vanuit dit perspectief benadert Graeber de huidige kredietcrisis en de toekomst van ons economisch systeem."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Electronic books"
  • "History"
  • "History"@en
  • "Geschiedenis (vorm)"

http://schema.org/name

  • "Debt The first 5,000 years"
  • "Debt : The First 5,000 Years"
  • "Debt : the first 5.000 years"
  • "Debt : the first 5,000 years"
  • "Debt : the first 5,000 years"@en
  • "Debt the first 5,000 years"@en
  • "Debt the first 5,000 years"
  • "Debt The First 5,000 Years"@en