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The controversy of Renaissance art /

Starting in the 1490s, Italy passed through a phase of religious conflict, one that anticipated and ran parallel to the Reformations of northern Europe. A season of controversy put religious images newly under scrutiny, provoking radical investigations into their modes and traditions. Could they reliably convey sacred truth and power, adn if so, how? Was the artist a transmitter or an interpreter, or both? Did Christian art have its own logic and legitimacy, or was it part of a long series of formal adaptations that began in deep antiquity? They most vocal religious critics in Italy were also, very often, the most refined patrons of art. Skepticism about images was redirected back into the art, again and again turning controversy into an aesthetic occasion. Working at the limits of the available media, artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Fra Bartolommeo, Giorgione, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giulio Romano, Andrea Riccio, Rosso Fiorentino, Titian, Michele Sanmicheli, and Hacopo Sansovino successively dismantled and reconstituted the categories of art-making. Hardly capable of sustaining a program of reform, the experimental art of this period was succeeded by a new era of cultural codification in the second half of the sixteenth century. The Controversy of Renaissance Art is a major reappraisal of a critical period of art-making from one of our most acclaimed historians of art.

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  • "Starting in the 1490s, Italy passed through a phase of religious conflict, one that anticipated and ran parallel to the Reformations of northern Europe. A season of controversy put religious images newly under scrutiny, provoking radical investigations into their modes and traditions. Could they reliably convey sacred truth and power, adn if so, how? Was the artist a transmitter or an interpreter, or both? Did Christian art have its own logic and legitimacy, or was it part of a long series of formal adaptations that began in deep antiquity? They most vocal religious critics in Italy were also, very often, the most refined patrons of art. Skepticism about images was redirected back into the art, again and again turning controversy into an aesthetic occasion. Working at the limits of the available media, artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Fra Bartolommeo, Giorgione, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giulio Romano, Andrea Riccio, Rosso Fiorentino, Titian, Michele Sanmicheli, and Hacopo Sansovino successively dismantled and reconstituted the categories of art-making. Hardly capable of sustaining a program of reform, the experimental art of this period was succeeded by a new era of cultural codification in the second half of the sixteenth century. The Controversy of Renaissance Art is a major reappraisal of a critical period of art-making from one of our most acclaimed historians of art."@en
  • "Many studies have shown that images - their presence in the daily lives of the faithful, the means used to control them, and their adaptation to secular uses - were at the heart of the Reformation crisis in northern Europe. But the question as it affects the art of Italy has been raised only in highly specialized studies. In this book, Alexander Nagel provides the first truly synthetic study of the controversies over religious images that pervaded Italian life both before and parallel to the Reformation north of the Alps. Tracing the intertwined relationship of artistic innovation and archaism, as well as the new pressures placed on the artistic media in the midst of key developments in religious iconography, "The Controversy of Renaissance Art" offers an important and original history of humanist thought and artistic experimentation from one of our most acclaimed historians of art."

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  • "The controversy of Renaissance art /"@en
  • "The controversy of Renaissance art /"
  • "The controversy of Renaissance art"
  • "The Controversy of Renaissance art /"