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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/350240

Howards end

The novel follows lives of three families in England at the beginning of the 20th century: the Wilcoxes, rich capitalists with a fortune made in the Colonies; the half German Schlegels, whose cultural pursuits have much in common with the real-life Bloomsbury Group; and the Basts, an impoverished young couple from a lower middle class background. The idealistically motivated, well read, highly intelligent Schlegel sisters seek to help the struggling Basts, wishing at the same time to rid the Wilcoxes of some of their deep-seated social and economic prejudices.

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http://schema.org/alternateName

  • "Legs de Mrs Wilcox"
  • "Ci qing ke wen tian"
  • "此情可問天"
  • "Hao hua yuan"@en
  • "Howards End"@pl
  • "Howards End"@tr
  • "Howards End"
  • "Howards End"@ja
  • "Howards end"@it
  • "Howards end"
  • "豪華園"
  • "E.M. Forster's 'Howards End'"

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http://schema.org/creator

http://schema.org/description

  • "Margaret and Helen Schlegel are sisters from a well-educated European family. A series of events brings them into a relationship with the very English Wilcox family. Both families also come into contact with Leonard Bast and his wife, a couple near the lowest tier of the rigid class system. Leonard's desire for cultural and intellectual status attracts the attention of Helen. Margaret must reconcile her independent spirit with her desire for companionship and a comfortable place in Edwardian society. Her moral strength is eventually able to resolve the tangle of opposites."
  • "The novel follows lives of three families in England at the beginning of the 20th century: the Wilcoxes, rich capitalists with a fortune made in the Colonies; the half German Schlegels, whose cultural pursuits have much in common with the real-life Bloomsbury Group; and the Basts, an impoverished young couple from a lower middle class background. The idealistically motivated, well read, highly intelligent Schlegel sisters seek to help the struggling Basts, wishing at the same time to rid the Wilcoxes of some of their deep-seated social and economic prejudices."@en
  • "To illuminate the changing times, Forster throws together three vastly dissimilar classes of people: the Schlegels, Helen and Margaret, educated, compassionate and independently wealthy; the Wilcoxes, nouveau riche Empire builders; and Leonard Bast, an ambitious but struggling bank clerk."
  • "To illuminate the changing times, Forster throws together three vastly dissimilar classes of people: the Schlegels, Helen and Margaret, educated, compassionate and independently wealthy; the Wilcoxes, nouveau riche Empire builders; and Leonard Bast, an ambitious but struggling bank clerk."@en
  • "Presents the portrait of a lost era and illuminates it with three vastly dissimilar classes of people."
  • "E.M. Forster unveils the English character as never before, exploring the underlying class warfare involving three distinct groups--a wealthy family bound by the rules of tradition and property, two independent, cultured sisters, and a young man living on the edge of poverty. The source of their conflict--Howards End, a house in the countryside which ultimately becomes a symbol of conflict within British society."@en
  • "Howards End is a novel by E.M. Forster, first published in 1910, about social and familial relations in turn-of-the-century England. Howards End is considered by some to be Forster's masterpiece."@en
  • "Heralded as E.M. Forster's masterpiece, Howards End explores the social, economic, and philosophical forces at play in England during the early twentieth century. Written in 1910, the novel delves into the lives of three families, each living within divergent social classes'the wealthy and materialistic Wilcoxes; the literary and cultured Schlegel sisters; and the impoverished Bast family. Through dramatic twists and turns that tightly interweave the stories of these families, Forster perfectly captures the changing social landscape of turn-of-the-century England, and Howards End continues to be recognized as a literary classic. It has been successfully adapted for both television and film, including the 1992 Merchant Ivory film starring Helena Bonham Carter, Anthony Hopkins, Vanessa Redgrave, and Emma Thompson. HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library."@en
  • "Howards End is a novel by E.M. Forster, first published in 1910, which tells a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-century England. The main theme is the difficulties, and also the benefits, of relationships between members of different social classes.-- Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia."@en
  • "The novel is about class struggle in turn-of-the-century England."@en
  • "A Rich moving novel."@en
  • "Howards End is a masterful discussion of changing social class-consciousness. Three families from different levels of society become intertwined: the rich capitalists, the intellectual bourgeoisie and the struggling poor. Forster does not suggest that relationships between the classes are easy, but he does think them vitally important. The social philosophy inherent in the novel is significant and beautifully written."@en
  • "Howards End is a novel by E.M. Forster, first published in 1910, which tells a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-century England. The main theme is the difficulties, and also the benefits, of relationships between members of different social classes. The book is about three families in England at the beginning of the twentieth century. The three families represent different gradations of the Edwardian middle class: the Wilcoxes, who are rich capitalists with a fortune made in the Colonies; the half-German Schlegel siblings (Margaret, Tibby, and Helen), who represent the intellectual bour."@en
  • "" "Only connect." This famous command is the catalyst which brings together two very different Edwardian families - the one passionate and progressive, the other hidebound by wealth and status - with irreversible and devastating consequences." [box cover note]."
  • "Howards End concerns the relationships that develop between the imaginative, life-loving Schlegel family -- Margaret, Helen, and their brother Tibby -- and the seemingly cool, pragmatic Wilcoxes -- Henry and Ruth and their children Charles, Paul, and Evie. Margaret finds a soulmate in Ruth, who before she dies declares in a note that her family's country house, Howards End, should go to Margaret. Her survivors choose to ignore her wishes, but after marrying Henry, Margaret ultimately does come to own the house. --From publisher's description."@en
  • "A collection of stories by Forster, including Howard's end, which reveals a glimpse of Edwardian England through the inhabitants of a country house in Hertfordshire called Howard's End."@en
  • "Howards End is a masterful discussion of changing social class-consciousness. Three families from different levels of society become intertwined: the rich capitalists, the intellectual bourgeoisie and the struggling poor. Forster does not suggest that relationships between the classes are easy, but he does think them vitally important. The social philosophy inherent in the novel is significant and beautifully written"
  • "A wealthy family bound by the rules of tradition and property, two independent, cultured sisters, and a young man living on the edge of poverty."
  • "Een jonge, cultureel bewuste vrouw maakt in het Engeland van begin deze eeuw kennis met een zeer materieel ingestelde familie."
  • ""Only Connect," Forster's key aphorism, informs this novel about an English country house, Howards End, and its influence on the lives of the wealthy and materialistic Wilcoxes; the cultured, idealistic Schlegel sisters; and the poor bank clerk Leonard Bast. Bringing together people from different classes and nations by way of sympathetic insight and understanding, Howards End eloquently addresses the question "Who shall inherit England'" (Lionel Trilling). From the Trade Paperback edition."@en
  • ""The disregard of a dying woman's bequest, a girl's attempt to help an impoverished clerk, and the marriage of an idealist and a materialist ? all intersect at an estate called Howards End. The fate of this country home symbolizes the future of England in an exploration of social, economic, and philosophical trends during the post-Victorian era." -- Amazon.com, 8/28/13."@en
  • ""First published in 1910, Howards End is the novel that earned E. M. Forster recognition as a major writer. At its heart lie two families - the wealthy and business-minded Wilcoxes and the cultured and idealistic Schlegels. When the beautiful and independent Helen Schlegel begins an impetuous affair with the ardent Paul Wilcox, a series of events is sparked - some very funny, some very tragic - that results in a dispute over who will inherit Howards End, the Wilcoxes' charming country home. As much about the clash between individual wills as the clash between the sexes and the classes, Howards End is a novel whose central tenet, "Only connect," remains a powerful prescription for modern life.""@en
  • "Un roman sur le thème de la réconciliation des extrêmes ou de la relation entre deux mondes opposés. Au cosmopolitisme et au goût raffiné des Schlegel s'opposent l'utilitarisme et le matérialisme des Wilcox."
  • "In Forster's most popular novel, he tracks British society's class warfare, as seen by members of three different castes-the wealthy Wilcoxes, the cultured and emancipated Schlegal sisters, and poor, young Leonard Bast."
  • "Set in Edwardian England, Howards End is the portrait of a lost era, a deceptively golden time before the First World War that would change values and lifestyles forever. To illuminate these changing times, Forster throws together three vastly dissimilar classes of people: the Schlegels, Helen and Margaret, educated, compassionate and independently wealthy; the Wilcoxes, nouveau riche Empire builders, and Leonard Bast, an ambitious but struggling bank clerk. As these three groups move in and out of each other's worlds, disasters and discoveries ensue."@en
  • "The classic novel explores the divisions of culture and class in late-Victorian England through the story of a disputed inheritance."@en
  • "The classic novel explores the divisions of culture and class in late-Victorian England through the story of a disputed inheritance."
  • "A novel about an English country house and its influence on the lives of people from different classes and nations."
  • "A strong-willed and intelligent woman refuses to allow the pretensions of her husband's smug English family to ruin her life."@en
  • "Tells the story of the idealistic, independent and highly educated Schlegel sisters and their tangled relationships with a rich businessman and his family, and with an unhappily married young bank clerk."@en
  • "This England of Foster's myth is a place of great natural beauty, and a nourisher of the imagination."@en
  • "Considered by many to be E.M. Forster's greatest novel, Howards End is a beautifully subtle tale of two very different families brought together by an unusual event. The Schlegels are intellectuals, devotees of art and literature. The Wilcoxes are practical and materialistic, leading lives of "telegrams and anger." When the elder Mrs. Wilcox dies and her family discovers she has left their country home-Howards End-to one of the Schlegel sisters, a crisis between the two families is precipitated that takes years to resolve. Written in 1910, Howards End is a symbolic exploration of the social, economic, and intellectual forces at work in England in the years preceding World War I, a time when vast social changes were occurring. In the Schlegels and the Wilcoxes, Forster perfectly embodies the competing idealism and materialism of the upper classes, while the conflict over the ownership of Howards End represents the struggle for possession of the country's future. As critic Lionel Trilling once noted, the novel asks, "Who shall inherit England?" Forster refuses to take sides in this conflict. Instead he poses one of the book's central questions: In a changing modern society, what should be the relation between the inner and outer life, between the world of the intellect and the world of business? Can they ever, as Forster urges, "only connect"?"@en
  • "Howards End concerns the relationships that develop between the imaginative, life-loving Schlegel family -- Margaret, Helen, and their brother Tibby -- and the seemingly cool, pragmatic Wilcoxes -- Henry and Ruth and their children Charles, Paul, and Evie. Margaret finds a soulmate in Ruth, who before she dies declares in a note that her family's country house, Howards End, should go to Margaret. Her survivors choose to ignore her wishes, but after marrying Henry, Margaret ultimately does come to own the house. --From publisher's description to Vintage Books edition of 1921."@en
  • "Un des très bons romans de la première période de cet auteur anglais (1910). Presque un tableau sociologique de l'époque où s'affrontent par deux familles interposées, deux modes de vie qui semblent irréconciliables jusqu'à ce que le mariage..."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Translations"
  • "Novels"
  • "Psychological fiction"@en
  • "Psychological fiction"
  • "Roman anglais"
  • "Young adult works"@en
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Historical fiction"@en
  • "Historical fiction"
  • "Powieść angielska"@pl
  • "Powieść angielska"
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Belletristische Darstellung"
  • "Love stories"@en
  • "fiction"
  • "Tekstuitgave"
  • "Romans (teksten)"
  • "Edwardian novels"@en
  • "Edwardian novels"
  • "Dictionaries"@en
  • "Manuscripts"@en
  • "Manuscripts"
  • "Autographs (Provenance)"
  • "Readers"@en
  • "Young adult fiction"@en
  • "Genres littéraires"
  • "Glossaries, vocabularies, etc"@en
  • "Criticism, interpretation, etc"
  • "Domestic fiction"
  • "Domestic fiction"@en
  • "Popular literature"
  • "History"@en
  • "History"

http://schema.org/name

  • "Wiedersehen in Howards End Roman"
  • "Talo jalavan varjossa"
  • "Talo jalavan varjossa"@fi
  • "ハワーズ・エンド"
  • "Howards end (E.M. Forster)"
  • "Hāwardʹz ind"
  • "Regreso a Howards end"@es
  • "Hawāzu Endo"
  • "Casa Howard "solo connettere : romanzo"
  • "Le Legs de Mrs. Wilcox : traduit de l'anglais par Ch. Mauron"
  • "Le Legs de Mrs. Wilcox [Roman] [Howards end]"
  • "Howards end. E. M. Forster"
  • "Szellem a házban"
  • "Howards End Roman"
  • "Regreso a Howards End"@es
  • "Regreso a Howards End"
  • "Howards end : (Le legs de Mrs Wilcox)"
  • "La Mansión"
  • "La mansión : novela"@es
  • "Howards en"
  • "Howards end"
  • "Howards end"@en
  • "Howards End ... New edition"
  • "Casa Howards"@it
  • "Howard's End"
  • "Howard's End"@en
  • "Wiedersehen in Howards End = Howards end"
  • "La Mansión : regreso a Howards End"
  • "Wiedersehen in Howards End"
  • "Szellem a házban : [regény]"@hu
  • "The manuscripts of Howards End"@en
  • "The manuscripts of Howards End"
  • "Howards end / E. M. Forster; With an introduction by Alfred Kazin"
  • "Lü yuan chun nong = Howards End"
  • "Howards End (E.M. Forster)"
  • "Casa Howard : solo connettere _"@it
  • "Wiedersehen in Howards End : Roman"
  • "綠苑春濃"
  • "Howards end : the manuscripts of Howards end; Correlated with Forster's final version by Oliver Stallybrass"
  • "Casa Howard : "solo connettere _""@it
  • "Howards end : [1910]"
  • "Howards end, e.m. forster"
  • "HOWARDS END"
  • "HOWARDS END"@en
  • "Lü Yuan Chun Nong"
  • "Howards End : le legs de Mrs Wilcox"
  • "Le Legs de Mrs Wilcox"
  • "Howards End [dt.]"
  • "Howard's end"@en
  • "Howard's end"
  • "Lu yuan chun nong"
  • "Hawŏjŭ endŭ"
  • "Howards End : (E.M. Forster)"@en
  • "Howards End : 'E : M. Forster'"
  • "Howards end : (Le legs de Mrs. Wilcox)"
  • "Wiedersehen in Howard End : Roman"
  • "綠苑春濃 = Howards End"
  • "Hawŏjŭ Endŭ"
  • "Howards End : [draft, with alternative versions]"
  • "E. M. Forster's 'Howards End'"
  • "Howards End and other stories : with a critical review from 1910"@en
  • "Howards end; a novel"@en
  • "Howards End. [With a portrait.]"
  • "Howards End. [With a portrait.]"@en
  • "Howards End : and other stories"@en
  • "Howards End : le legs de Mrs. Wilcox"
  • "The manuscripts of "Howards End""
  • "Le Legs de Mrs. Wilcox"
  • "Howards End : (E. M. Forster)"
  • "La Mansión : novela"
  • "绿苑春浓"
  • "Howards End = le Legs de Mrs Wilcox"
  • "The manuscripts of "Howards End" : correlated with Forster's final version by Oliver Stallybrass"
  • "Howards end [Classic]"@en
  • "E.M. Forster: Howards End"@en
  • "Hawārdz ind"
  • "Powrót do Howards End"@pl
  • "Powrót do Howards End"
  • "Howards end (E. M. Forster)"
  • "Howards End"@en
  • "Howards End"
  • "Howards End"@da
  • "Howards End"@ca
  • "Howards End"@sv
  • "Howards End"@tr
  • "Howards End"@pl
  • "Casa Howard"
  • "Casa Howard"@en
  • "Casa Howard"@it
  • "Casa Howard : "Solo connettere... ""
  • "Casa Howard : solo connettere... : romanzo"@it
  • "하워즈엔드"
  • "Rodinné sídlo Howards End"
  • "Wiedersehen in Howards End = Howards End"
  • "The manuscripts of Howards end; correlated with Forster's final version by Oliver Stallybrass"@en
  • "Howards end : le legs de Mrs. Wilcox"
  • "Howards end : Le legs de Mrs Wilcox"
  • "La mansión : Novela"@es
  • "Domostwo pani Wilcox"
  • "Domostwo pani Wilcox"@pl
  • ""Howards end""
  • "하워즈. 엔드"
  • "Howard's End [sound recording]"
  • "Casa Howard : "Solo connettere...""@it
  • "Howards end ; and other stories"
  • "Howards end : Roman"
  • "Nihāyat Hawārdz, au, manzil al-ḥubb al-awwal"
  • "Hawāzu endo"
  • "Hawāzu endo"@ja
  • "Howards End by E.M. Forster"@en
  • "The Howard's end"
  • "Epistrophē sto Chaouarnts Ent : mythistorēma"
  • "La mansión : regreso a Howards End"@es
  • "Rodinné sídlo"
  • "Howard's End (E. M. Forster)"
  • "Casa Howard : romanzo"@it
  • "Howards end : (le legs de mrs. Wilcox)"
  • "Howards End : Roman"
  • "Howards End and other stories"@en
  • "The manuscripts of 'Howards End'"@en
  • "Le legs de Mrs. Wilcox : [roman]"
  • "La mansión"
  • "La mansión"@es
  • "Hawŏchŭ entŭ"
  • "E.M. Forster's Howards End"@en
  • "E.M. Forster's Howards End"

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