WorldCat Linked Data Explorer

http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/365134754

To be somebody

Many Americans, struggling to survive the Great Depression, were determined to help build a better America through direct action in the courts, in the Congress and in everyday life. At a time when lynching, segregation, and anti-semitism were commonplace, black heavy-weight champion, Joe Louis became a symbol of national strength. In very different ways Louis and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged America to live up to its promise of justice and opportunity for people of every race and faith. Primarily uses interviews and historical film footage to portray the era.

Open All Close All

http://schema.org/about

http://schema.org/description

  • "Many Americans, struggling to survive the Great Depression, were determined to help build a better America through direct action in the courts, in the Congress and in everyday life. At a time when lynching, segregation, and anti-semitism were commonplace, black heavy-weight champion, Joe Louis became a symbol of national strength. In very different ways Louis and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged America to live up to its promise of justice and opportunity for people of every race and faith. Primarily uses interviews and historical film footage to portray the era."
  • "Many Americans, struggling to survive the Great Depression, were determined to help build a better America through direct action in the courts, in the Congress and in everyday life. At a time when lynching, segregation, and anti-semitism were commonplace, black heavy-weight champion, Joe Louis became a symbol of national strength. In very different ways Louis and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged America to live up to its promise of justice and opportunity for people of every race and faith. Primarily uses interviews and historical film footage to portray the era."@en
  • "This part of The Great Depression series shows that for many Americans who were denied the rights of full citizenship, surviving the Depression was not enough. They were determined to help build a better America through direct action in the courts, in the Congress, and in everyday life. At a time when lyncvhings, segregation, and anti-Semitism were commonplace, black heavyweight cahmpion Joe Lewis became a symbol of national strength. In very different ways, Lewis and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged America to live up to its promise of justice and opportunity for people of every race and faith."@en
  • "Many Americans, struggling to survive the Great Depression, were determined to help build a better America through direct action in the courts, in the Congress and in everyday life. At a time when lynchings, segregation, and anti-semitism were commonplace, black heavy-weight champion, Joe Louis became a symbol of national strength. In very different ways Louis and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged America to live up to its promise of justice and opportunity for people of every race and faith."@en
  • "Many Americans, struggling to survive the Great Depression, were determined to help build a better America through direct action in the courts, in the Congress and in everyday life. At a time when lynchings, segregation, and anti-semitism were commonplace, black heavy-weight champion, Joe Louis became a symbol of national strength. In very different ways Louis and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged America to live up to its promise of justice and opportunity for people of every race and faith."
  • "Summary: For many Americans who were denied the rights of full citizenship, surviving the Depression was not enough. They were determined to build a better American through direct action in the courts, in the Congress, in everyday life. At a time when lynchings, segregation, and anti-semitism were commonplace, black heavyweight champion Joe Louis became a symbol of national strenght. In very different ways, Louis and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged America to live up to its promise of justice and opportunity for people of every race and faith."
  • "Many Americans, struggling to survive the Great Depression, were determined to help build a better America through direct action in the courts, in the Congress and in everyday life. Black heavy-weight champion Joe Louis became a symbol of national strength at a time when lynchings, segregation, and anti-semitism were commonplace. In different ways both Louis and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged America to live up to its promise of justice and opportunity for people of every race and faith."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Video recordings for the hearing impaired."
  • "Nonfiction television programs."
  • "Nonfiction television programs."@en
  • "Documentary television programs."@en
  • "Documentary television programs."
  • "Television programs."@en
  • "Television programs."
  • "History"@en
  • "History"
  • "Films for the hearing impaired."@en
  • "Films for the hearing impaired."
  • "Video recordings"

http://schema.org/name

  • "To be somebody /"
  • "Great depression -"
  • "To be somebody"@en
  • "To be somebody"