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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/450874

The Assistant

Publisher's description: Bernard Malamud's second novel, originally published in 1957, is the story of Morris Bober, a grocer in postwar Brooklyn, who "wants better" for himself and his family. First two robbers appear and hold him up. Then things take a turn for the better when broken-nosed Frank Alpine becomes his assistant. But there are complications: Frank, whose reaction to Jews is ambivalent, falls in love with Helen Bober at the same time he begins to steal from the store. Like Malamud's best stories, this novel unerringly evokes an immigrant world of cramped circumstances and great expectations. Malamud defined the immigrant experience in a way that has proven vital for several generations of writers.

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http://schema.org/description

  • "A struggling neighborhood Jewish grocer takes on a helper who falls in love with his daughter and steals from his store."
  • "Morris Bober is an elderly Jew. He runs a New York grocery store, always hovering on the brink of bankruptcy. The arrival of Frank Alpine, almost a self-appointed assistant, changes all their lives- a gently told story with a growing undercurrent of excitement."
  • "De overvaller van een schlemielige joodse kruidenier in New York krijgt berouw en besluit hem te gaan helpen."
  • "Bernard Malamud's second novel is the story of Morris Bober, a grocer in post-WWII Brooklyn, who "wants better" for himself and his family. First two robbers appear and hold him up then things take a turn for the better when broken-nosed Frank Alpine becomes his assistant. But there are complications: Frank, whose reaction to Jews is ambivalent, falls in love with Helen Bober at the same time he begins to steal from the store."
  • "Publisher's description: Bernard Malamud's second novel, originally published in 1957, is the story of Morris Bober, a grocer in postwar Brooklyn, who "wants better" for himself and his family. First two robbers appear and hold him up. Then things take a turn for the better when broken-nosed Frank Alpine becomes his assistant. But there are complications: Frank, whose reaction to Jews is ambivalent, falls in love with Helen Bober at the same time he begins to steal from the store. Like Malamud's best stories, this novel unerringly evokes an immigrant world of cramped circumstances and great expectations. Malamud defined the immigrant experience in a way that has proven vital for several generations of writers."@en
  • ""There were times when he imagined himself, instead, telling it all to Helen. He wanted to do something that would open her eyes to his true self, but who could be a hero in a grocery store?" "Malamud takes a familiar, almost mythical theme, turns it upside down and irradiates it with originality ... (he) brings to his story of the poor not only pity without sentimentality and realism without bad taste; he gives their humblest acts a kind of foreboding excitement that can only spring from a conviction that they--the poor and the meek--will inherit the earth".--"Time.""
  • "Frank, a troubled, somewhat desperate, Italo-American works long hours in the grocery store of a struggling Jewish family in a Brooklyn neighborhood. He develops a secret passion for his employer's attractive daughter."@en
  • "Frank, a troubled, somewhat desperate, Italian American, works long hours in the grocery store of a struggling Jewish family in a Brooklyn neighborhood where he develops a secret passion for his employer's attractive daughter."@en
  • "Frank, a troubled, somewhat desperate, Italian American, works long hours in the grocery store of a struggling Jewish family in a Brooklyn neighborhood where he develops a secret passion for his employer's attractive daughter."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Jewish fiction"@en
  • "Jewish fiction"
  • "Love stories"
  • "Love stories"@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Psychological fiction"
  • "Psychological fiction"@en
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "General fiction"
  • "Domestic fiction"@en
  • "Domestic fiction"

http://schema.org/name

  • "The Assistant"@en
  • "The assistant; a novel"@en
  • "The assistant; a novel"
  • "The assistant a novel"
  • "The assistant a novel"@en
  • "The assistant : a novel"
  • "The assistant : a novel"@en
  • "The assistant"@en
  • "The assistant"
  • "Assistant"
  • "Assistant"@en
  • "The assistant: a novel"
  • "The assistant : A novel"
  • "The Assistant"

http://schema.org/workExample