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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/48674264

Black like me notes

The startling, penetrating, first-hand account of a white man who learned what it is like to live as a black in the South by dying his skinblack.

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http://schema.org/alternateName

  • "私のように黒い夜"
  • "Griffin's Black like me"@en
  • "Cliffs notes on Griffin's Black like me"@en
  • "watashi no yōni kuroi yoru"@ja
  • "Black like me"@pl
  • "Black like me"@ja

http://schema.org/description

  • "In 1959 a white writer, John Howard Griffin, darkened his skin and passed for a time as a "Negro" in the Deep South. Black Like Me captures the violence that perpetuated segregation, and is an eye-witness description of a system that existed within living memory. It comes with an epilogue describing the threats Griffin received and his later work campaigning alongside Martin Luther King."
  • "Black Like Me captures the violence that perpetuated segregation, and is an eye-witness description of a system that existed within living memory. It comes with an epilogue describing the threats Griffin received and his later work campaigning alongside Martin Luther King."
  • "The Deep South of the late 1950's was another country: a land of lynchings, segregated lunch counters, whites-only restrooms, and a color line etched in blood across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. White journalist John Howard Griffin, working for the black-owned magazine Sepia, decided to cross that line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man. What happened to John Howard Griffin--from the outside and within himself--as he made his way through the segregated Deep South is recorded in this searing work of nonfiction. Educated and soft-spoken, John Howard Griffin changed only the color of his skin. It was enough to make him hated...enough to nearly get him killed. His audacious, still chillingly relevant eyewitness history is a work about race and humanity every American should read."
  • "Formou deníkových záznamů podává americký novinář, fotograf a spisovatel otřesné svědectví o zkušenostech bělocha vystupujícího na Jihu jako černoch. Líčí nejen diskriminaci černochů, ale i pocity beznaděje, strachu a."
  • "In the Deep South of the 1950s, a color line was etched in blood across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. The author, a journalist decided to cross that line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a Southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man. What happened to him, from the outside and within himself, as he made his way through the segregated Deep South is recorded in this searing work of nonfiction. This eyewitness history about race and humanity, is still a relevant . -- From cover."
  • "The startling, penetrating, first-hand account of a white man who learned what it is like to live as a black in the South by dying his skinblack."@en
  • "The author underwent a series of medical treatments to change his skin color to black, and then proceeded to travel through the Deep South."
  • "The author underwent a series of medical treatments to change his skin color to black, and then proceeded to travel through the Deep South."@en
  • "A white writer recounts his experiences in the American South following treatments that darkened his skin and shares his thoughts on the problems of prejudice and racial injustice."@en
  • "A white writer recounts his experiences in the American South following treatments that darkened his skin and shares his thoughts on the problems of prejudice and racial injustice."
  • ""In the Deep South of the 1950s, a color line was etched in blood across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. Journalist John Howard Griffin decided to cross that line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a Southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man. What happened to John Howard Griffin - from the outside and within himself - as he made his way through the segregated Deep South is recorded in this searing work of nonfiction." - Cover."
  • "Griffin turned himself into a black man to experience the sting of prejudice firsthand."
  • "The Deep South of the late 1950's was another country: a land of lynchings, segregated lunch counters, whites-only restrooms, and a color line etched in blood across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. White journalist John Howard Griffin, working for the black-owned magazine Sepia, decided to cross that line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man. What happened to John Howard Griffin--from the outside and within himself--as he made his way through the segregated Deep South is recorded in this searing work of nonfiction. Educated and soft-spoken, John Howard Griffin changed only the color of his skin. It was enough to make him hated ... enough to nearly get him killed. His audacious, still chillingly relevant eyewitness history is a work about race and humanity every American should read."
  • "In the deep south of the 1950's, journalist John Howard Griffin used medication to darken his skin to a deep brown. He exchanged his privileged life as a Southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man."
  • "The author, a white man, recounts his experiences when he darkened his skin and traveled through the South as a black man. Includes an epilogue."@en
  • ""The author, 'who is white, a Catholic, and a Texan, conceived and carried out the unusual notion of blackening his skin with a newly developed pigment drug and traveling through the Deep South as an African American. This book, part of which appeared in the African American magazine, Sepia, is a journal account of that experience.'" New Yorker."@en
  • ""In the Deep South of the 1950s, a color line was etched in blood across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. Journalist John Howard Griffin decided to cross that line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a Southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man. What happened to John Howard Griffin-- from the outside and within himself-- as he made his way through the segregated Deep South is recorded in this searing work of nonfiction"--Back cover."
  • "In the Deep South of the 1950s, a color line was etched in blood across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. Journalist John Howard Griffin decided to cross that line. Using medication that darkened his skin to deep brown, he exchanged his privileged life as a Southern white man for the disenfranchised world of an unemployed black man. What happened to John Howard Griffin, from the outside and within himself, as he made his way through the segregated Deep South is recorded in this searing work of nonfiction.--From cover."
  • "In the fall of 1959, journalist John Howard Griffin, using medication that darkened his skin to a deep brown, left behind his life as a Southern white man and journeyed into the world of the deep South as an unemployed black man. What happened to Griffin, from the outside and within himself, is documented in this classic work about the racial divide in pre-civil rights America.."
  • "On the inhuman treatment of the blacks in Southern State of America; first person account."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Reality memoirs"
  • "Study guides"@en
  • "Biography"
  • "Biography"@en
  • "Juvenile works"
  • "Criticism, interpretation, etc"@en
  • "Electronic books"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Black like me notes"@en
  • "私のように黒い夜"
  • "Watakushi no yōni kuroi yoru"@ja
  • "Watakushi no yōni kuroi yoru"
  • "Black like me"
  • "Black like me"@en
  • "Black like me. [An account of a white man's experiences when living disguised as a negro in the southern states of America.]"@en
  • "Watakushi no yō ni kuroi yoru"
  • "假如我是"黑人""
  • "Black Like Me"
  • "Black Like Me"@en
  • "Black like me : notes, including the life of the author, general introduction, list of characters"@en
  • "Black Like Me Library Edition"
  • "Hama kalu nisā"
  • "Černý jako já"
  • "Black like me : updated with a new epilogue by the author"
  • "Black like me : updated with a new epilogue by the author"@en
  • "Reise durch das Dunkel"
  • "Black like me : notes"
  • "Black like me : notes"@en
  • "Czarny jak ja"
  • "Czarny jak ja"@pl
  • "Jia ru wo shi hei ren"
  • "Svart som en nigger"
  • "Svart som en nigger"@sv
  • "Reise durch das dunkel"
  • "Reise durch das Dunkel : Tagebuch"
  • "Black like me [Text]"
  • "Kāyāpālaṭa"

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