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The interpretation of murder : a novel /

International Bestseller#1 U.K. BestsellerThe Wall Street Journal BestsellerLos Angeles Times BestsellerIn the summer of 1909, Sigmund Freud arrived by steamship in New York Harbor for a short visit to America. Though he would live another thirty years, he would never return to this country. Little is known about the week he spent in Manhattan, and Freud's biographers have long speculated as to why, in his later years, he referred to Americans as "savages" and "criminals." In The Interpretation of Murder, Jed Rubenfeld weaves the facts of Freud's visit into a riveting, atmospheric story of corruption and murder set all over turn-of-the-century New York. Drawing on case histories, Shakespeare's Hamlet, and the historical details of a city on the brink of modernity, The Interpretation of Murder introduces a brilliant new storyteller, a novelist who, in the words of The New York Times, "will be no ordinary pop-cultural sensation."

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  • "International Bestseller#1 U.K. BestsellerThe Wall Street Journal BestsellerLos Angeles Times BestsellerIn the summer of 1909, Sigmund Freud arrived by steamship in New York Harbor for a short visit to America. Though he would live another thirty years, he would never return to this country. Little is known about the week he spent in Manhattan, and Freud's biographers have long speculated as to why, in his later years, he referred to Americans as "savages" and "criminals." In The Interpretation of Murder, Jed Rubenfeld weaves the facts of Freud's visit into a riveting, atmospheric story of corruption and murder set all over turn-of-the-century New York. Drawing on case histories, Shakespeare's Hamlet, and the historical details of a city on the brink of modernity, The Interpretation of Murder introduces a brilliant new storyteller, a novelist who, in the words of The New York Times, "will be no ordinary pop-cultural sensation.""@en
  • "An Intricate Tale of murder and the mind's most dangerous mysteries The Interpretation of Murder opens on a hot summer night in 1909 as Sigmund Freud arrives in New York. Among those waiting to greet him is Dr. Stratham Younger, a gifted physician who is one of Freud's most ardent American supporters. And so begins the visit that will be the great genius's first and only journey to America. The morning after Freud's arrival, in an opulent penthouse across the city, a woman is discovered murdered whipped, mutilated, and strangled with a white silk tie. The next day, a rebellious heiress named Nora Acton barely escapes becoming the killer s second victim. Yet, suffering from hysteria, Miss Acton cannot remember the terrifying incident or her attacker. Asked to consult on the case, Dr. Younger calls on the visiting Freud to guide him through the girl's analysis. The Interpretation of Murder is an intricately plotted, elegantly wrought entertainment filled with delicious surprises, subtle sleights of hand, and fascinating ideas. Drawing on Freud s case histories, Shakespeare's Hamlet, and the rich history of New York, this remarkable novel marks the debut of a brilliantly engaging new storyteller."@en
  • "The Interpretation of Murder opens on a hot summer night in 1909 as Sigmund Freud arrives in New York. Among those waiting to greet him is Dr. Stratham Younger, a gifted physician who is one of Freud?s most ardent American supporters. And so begins the visit that will be the great genius?s first?and only?journey to America. The morning after Freud?s arrival, in an opulent penthouse across the city, a woman is discovered murdered?whipped, mutilated, and strangled with a white silk tie. The next day, a rebellious heiress named Nora Acton barely escapes becoming the killer?s second victim. Yet, suffering from hysteria, Miss Acton cannot remember the terrifying incident or her attacker. Asked to consult on the case, Dr. Younger calls on the visiting Freud to guide him through the girl?s analysis. The Interpretation of Murder is an intricately plotted, elegantly wrought entertainment filled with delicious surprises, subtle sleights of hand, and fascinating ideas. Drawing on Freud?s case histories, Shakespeare?s Hamlet, and the rich history of New York, this remarkable novel marks the debut of a brilliantly engaging new storyteller."@en
  • "Dr. Freud is called in when a young women and her parents are attacked by a killer and she can't remember the details of the attack."
  • "Sigmund Freud uses his psychoanalytical skills to help solve the murders of New York society heiresses."
  • "On the morning after Sigmund Freud arrives in New York on his first -- and only -- visit to the United States, a stunning debutante is found bound and strangled in her penthouse apartment, high above Broadway. The following night, another beautiful heiress, Nora Acton, is discovered tied to a chandelier in her parents' home, viciously wounded and unable to speak or to recall her ordeal. Soon Freud and his American disciple, Stratham Younger, are enlisted to help Miss Acton recover her memory, and to piece together the killer's identity. It is a riddle that will test their skills to the limit, and lead them on a thrilling journey -- into the darkest places of the city, and of the human mind."@en
  • "In 1909, as a sadistic killer stalks Manhattan's wealthiest heiresses, Sigmund Freud is called in by American analyst Dr. Stratham Younger to assist him in interviewing Nora Acton, a hysterical survivor of the killer who can recall nothing about the attack."
  • "On the morning after Sigmund Freud arrives in New York on his first--and only--visit to the United States, a stunning debutante is found bound and strangled in her penthouse apartment, high above Broadway. The following night, another beautiful heiress, Nora Acton, is discovered tied to a chandelier in her parents' home, viciously wounded and unable to speak or to recall her ordeal. Soon Freud and his American disciple, Stratham Younger, are enlisted to help Miss Acton recover her memory, and to piece together the killer's identity. It is a riddle that will test their skills to the limit, and lead them on a thrilling journey--into the darkest places of the city, and of the human mind."@en
  • "It has been said that a mystery novel is "about something" and a literary tale is not. The Interpretation of Murder has legitimate claims to both genres. It is most definitely about something, and also replete with allusions to and explications of Shakespeare, to the very beginnings of psychology, to the infighting between psychoanalytic giants--all written in a style that an author with literary aspirations might well envy. In 1909, Drs. Freud and Jung visit Manhattan. They no sooner arrive when a young socialite is murdered, followed by another attempted murder, bearing the same characteristics. In the second case, the victim lives. She has lost her voice and cannot remember anything. The young doctor, Stratham Younger, who has invited Freud to speak at his University, soon involves Dr. Freud in the case. Freud, saying that Nora's case will require a time committment that he does not have, turns her over to Younger. The rudiments of Nora's case are based on Freud's famous Dora, complete with sexual perversions, convoluted twists and turns and downright lies. That is just one of the myriad plot lines in the novel, all of which are intricate, interesting and plausible. All it takes for all of the incidents to be true is a great deal of bad will--and it is abundant here! There are politicians who are less than statesmen, city employees at work for themselves and not the city, doctors who will do anything to undermine Freud's theories, thereby saving the neurotics for themselves, and opportunists at every level of society, seeking psychological or material advantage. Carl Jung is portrayed by turns as secretive, mysterious, odd, and just plain nuts, while Freud remains a gentleman whose worst problem is his bladder. Not the least interesting aspect of the book is all the turn-of-the-century New York lore: bridge building, great mansions, the Astor versus Vanderbilt dustup, immigrant involvement, fabulous entertaining, auto versus carriage. Despite the tangle of tales, debut author Jed Rubenfeld finishes it with."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Large type books"
  • "Crime & Mystery."@en
  • "Detective and mystery stories."@en
  • "Detective and mystery stories."
  • "Historical fiction"
  • "Historical fiction"@en
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Mystery fiction."
  • "Historical fiction."
  • "Historical fiction."@en
  • "Large type books."
  • "Mystery fiction"
  • "Ausgabe."
  • "Fiction."@en
  • "Suspense fiction."@en
  • "Electronic books."@en
  • "Detective and mystery stories"
  • "Detective and mystery stories"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "The interpretation of murder : a novel /"
  • "The interpretation of murder : a novel /"@en
  • "The Interpretation of Murder /"
  • "The Interpretation of murder : a novel /"
  • "The interpretation of murder"
  • "The interpretation of murder a novel /"@en
  • "The interpretation of murder a novel /"
  • "The interpretation of murder /"
  • "The interpretation of murder /"@en
  • "The Interpretation of Murder : a Novel /"@en
  • "The Interpretation of Murder:A Novel."@en
  • "The Interpretation of Murder."@en
  • "The interpretation of murder."@en

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