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The man who mistook his wife for a hat

Music can move us to the heights or depths of emotion. It can persuade us to buy something, or remind us of our first date. It can lift us out of depression when nothing else can. It can get us dancing to its beat. But the power of music goes much, much further. Indeed, music occupies more areas of our brain than language does--humans are a musical species. Oliver Sacks's compassionate, compelling tales of people struggling to adapt to different neurological conditions have fundamentally changed the way we think of our own brains, and of the human experience. Here, he examines the powers of music through the individual experiences of patients, musicians, and everyday people. Music is irresistible, haunting, and unforgettable, and Oliver Sacks tells us why.--From publisher description.

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  • "Man who mistook his wife for a hat"

http://schema.org/description

  • "Music can move us to the heights or depths of emotion. It can persuade us to buy something, or remind us of our first date. It can lift us out of depression when nothing else can. It can get us dancing to its beat. But the power of music goes much, much further. Indeed, music occupies more areas of our brain than language does--humans are a musical species. Oliver Sacks's compassionate, compelling tales of people struggling to adapt to different neurological conditions have fundamentally changed the way we think of our own brains, and of the human experience. Here, he examines the powers of music through the individual experiences of patients, musicians, and everyday people. Music is irresistible, haunting, and unforgettable, and Oliver Sacks tells us why.--From publisher description."
  • "Music can move us to the heights or depths of emotion. It can persuade us to buy something, or remind us of our first date. It can lift us out of depression when nothing else can. It can get us dancing to its beat. But the power of music goes much, much further. Indeed, music occupies more areas of our brain than language does--humans are a musical species. Oliver Sacks's compassionate, compelling tales of people struggling to adapt to different neurological conditions have fundamentally changed the way we think of our own brains, and of the human experience. Here, he examines the powers of music through the individual experiences of patients, musicians, and everyday people. Music is irresistible, haunting, and unforgettable, and Oliver Sacks tells us why.--From publisher description."@en
  • "Well-known neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks presents patients from some of his most fascinating cases: the music teacher who mistakes his wife for a hat, retarded twins who speak in dialogues of twenty digit prime numbers, and others."@en
  • "Clinical tales, case history, neurological disorders, author of Awakening and a Leg to stand on Oliver Sacks."@en
  • "Explores neurological disorders and their effects upon the minds and lives of those affected."@en
  • "Explores neurological disorders and their effects upon the minds and lives of those affected."
  • "In his most extraordinary book, "one of the great clinical writers of the 20th century" (The New York Times) recounts the case histories of patients lost in the bizarre, apparently inescapable world of neurological disorders. Oliver Sacks's The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat tells the stories of individuals afflicted with fantastic perceptual and intellectual aberrations: patients who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognize people and common objects; who are stricken with violent tics and grimaces or who shout involuntary obscenities; whose limbs have become alien; who have been dismissed as retarded yet are gifted with uncanny artistic or mathematical talents. If inconceivably strange, these brilliant tales remain, in Dr. Sacks's splendid and sympathetic telling, deeply human. They are studies of life struggling against incredible adversity, and they enable us to enter the world of the neurologically impaired, to imagine with our hearts what it must be to live and feel as they do. A great healer, Sacks never loses sight of medicine's ultimate responsibility: "the suffering, afflicted, fighting human subject.""
  • "Looks at what happens when things go wrong with parts of the brain most of us don't know exist. This work shows the awesome powers of our mind and just how delicately balanced they have to be. It is suitable for those who have felt from time to time that certain twinge of self-identity and sensed how easily, at any moment, one might lose it."
  • "Presents a series of stories about men and women who, representing both medical and literary oddities, raise fundamental questions about the nature of reality."
  • "This illuminating book about the power of music examines savants and synthesthetics, depressives and musical dreamers, and the author succeeds in articulating the musical experience and locating it in the human brain."@en
  • ""Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition. In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls "musical misalignments." Among them: a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age of forty-two; an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; people with "amusia," to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans; and a man whose memory spans only seven seconds - for everything but music. Dr. Sacks describes how music can animate people with Parkinson's disease who cannot otherwise move, give words to stroke patients who cannot otherwise speak, and calm and organize people who are deeply disoriented by Alzheimer's or schizophrenia." - Back cover."@en
  • ""Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition. In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls "musical misalignments." Among them: a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age of forty-two; an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; people with "amusia," to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans; and a man whose memory spans only seven seconds - for everything but music. Dr. Sacks describes how music can animate people with Parkinson's disease who cannot otherwise move, give words to stroke patients who cannot otherwise speak, and calm and organize people who are deeply disoriented by Alzheimer's or schizophrenia." - Back cover."
  • "Oliver Sacks has been hailed by the New York Times as 'one of the great clinical writers of the twentieth century'. In this eagerly awaited new book, the subject of his uniquely literate scrutiny is music: our relationship with it, our facility for it, and what this most universal of passions says about us. In chapters examining savants and synaesthetics, depressives and musical dreamers, Sacks succeeds not only in articulating the musical experience but in locating it in the human brain. He shows that music is not simply about sound, but also movement, visualization, and silence. He follows the experiences of patients suddenly drawn to or suddenly divorced from music. And in so doing he shows, as only he can, both the extraordinary spectrum of human expression and the capacity of music to heal. Wise, compassionate and compellingly readable, "Musicophilia" promises, like all the best writing, to alter our conception of who we are and how we function, to lend a fascinating insight into the mysteries of the mind, and to show us what it is to be human."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Fallstudiensammlung"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Large type books"@en
  • "Humor"@en
  • "Case studies"@en
  • "Case studies"
  • "Anecdotes"@en
  • "Anecdotes"
  • "Casestudies (vorm)"

http://schema.org/name

  • "The man who mistook his wife for a hat"@en
  • "The man who mistook his wife for a hat"
  • "Musicophilia : tables of music and the brain"
  • "The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat and Other Clinical Tales"
  • "Musicophilia : Tales of Music and the Brain"
  • "Musicophilia : tales of music and the brain"
  • "Musicophilia : tales of music and the brain"@en
  • "The man who mistook his wife for a hat : And other clinical tales"
  • "The man who mistook his wife for a hat [text (large print)]"
  • "Musicophilia tales of music and the brain"@en
  • "Musicophilia tales of music and the brain"
  • "The man who mistook his wife for a hat : and other clinical tales"
  • "The man who mistook his wife for a hat : and other clinical tales"@en
  • "Man who mistook his wife for a hat"@en
  • "Musicophilia : Tales of music and the brain"
  • "The man who mistook is wife for a hat"@en
  • "The man who mistook his wife for a hat and other clinical tales"@en
  • "The man who mistook his wife for a hat and other clinical tales"
  • "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat : and Other Clinical Tales"
  • "Musicophilia"@en
  • "The Man who mistook his wife for a hat and other clinical tales : Oliver Sacks"@en
  • "Musicophilia : tales of music and the brain ; The man who mistook his wife for a hat"
  • "The man who mistook his wife for a hat and other clinical tales [Arabic editon]"
  • "The Man who mistook his wife for a hat : and other clinical tales"@en

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