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Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds /

Originally published in 1841, this classic is a serious but frequently hilarious study of mass madness, crowd psychology, and human folly throughout the ages. Chronicled here are accounts of swindles, schemes, and scams, as well as fads and delusions that have sprung from ideas, beliefs, and causes that still have champions today: the prophecies of Nostradamus, the imminent coming of Judgment Day, the Rosicrucians, and astrology. The book also surveys controversial people and movements of the past: witch burnings, the Crusades, necromancy, Mesmerism, and tulipmania. Here are the human quirks that make stocks and hemlines rise and fall, hairstyles change, and beards sprout. For every reader who has ever been a part of it all--remember McCarthyism and Elvis?--or is just curious about grand-scale madness, schemes, and bamboozlement, here is a book that shows how any age, even ours, is susceptible to mindless hysteria.--From publisher description.

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  • "First published in 1841, this book is often cited as the best book ever written about market psychology. This edition includes Charles Mackay's account of the three infamous financial manias--John Law's Mississippi Scheme, the South Sea Bubble, and Tulipomania. Between the three of them, these historic episodes confirm that greed and fear have always been the driving forces of financial markets, and, furthermore, that being sensible and clever is no defense against the mesmeric allure of a popular craze with the wind behind it. In writing the history of the great financial manias, Charles Mackay proved himself a master chronicler of social as well as financial history. Blessed with a cast of characters that covered all the vices, gifted a passage of events which was inevitably heading for disaster, and with the benefit of hindsight, he produced a record that is at once a riveting thriller and absorbing historical document.--From publisher description."
  • ""First published in 1841, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is often cited as the best book ever written about market psychology. This Harriman House edition includes Charles Mackay's account of the three infamous financial manias - John Law's Mississipi Scheme, the South Sea Bubble, and Tulipomania. Between the three of them, these historic episodes confirm that greed and fear have always been the driving forces of financial markets, and, furthermore, that being sensible and clever is no defence against the mesmeric allure of a popular craze with the wind behind it. In writing the history of the great financial manias, Charles Mackay proved himself a master chronicler of social as well as financial history."--pub. description."
  • "Presents a comprehensive account of paranormal beliefs and popular delusions in history including the seventeenth-century madness surrounding the value of tulips in Holland, witch hunts and haunted houses, health cures and scares, and other examples of human gullibility."
  • ""Every age has its peculiar folly; some scheme, project, or phantasy into which it plunges, spurred on by the love of gain, the necessity of excitement, or the mere force of imitation," said author Charles Mackay. It was true then in 1841, and it is certainly true now. This informative, funny collection of popular delusions, from Alchemy to Mesmerism, has become a classic--a study of mass manias, crowd behavior, and human folly. The book encompasses a broad range of scams, manias, and deceptions including witch burning and the Great Crusades. Here are the human quirks that created the Mississippi Bubble and Tulipomania--when speculators lost fortunes on a single tulip bulb. Here are the follies and fads that dictated fashion through the ages."
  • "Originally published in 1841, this classic is a serious but frequently hilarious study of mass madness, crowd psychology, and human folly throughout the ages. Chronicled here are accounts of swindles, schemes, and scams, as well as fads and delusions that have sprung from ideas, beliefs, and causes that still have champions today: the prophecies of Nostradamus, the imminent coming of Judgment Day, the Rosicrucians, and astrology. The book also surveys controversial people and movements of the past: witch burnings, the Crusades, necromancy, Mesmerism, and tulipmania. Here are the human quirks that make stocks and hemlines rise and fall, hairstyles change, and beards sprout. For every reader who has ever been a part of it all--remember McCarthyism and Elvis?--or is just curious about grand-scale madness, schemes, and bamboozlement, here is a book that shows how any age, even ours, is susceptible to mindless hysteria.--From publisher description."@en
  • "Memopirs of extraordinary popular delusions."
  • "First published in 1841, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is often cited as the best book ever written about market psychology. Explore the sometimes humorous, sometimes devastating impact of crowd behavior and trading trickery on the financial market."
  • "Singular casebook of human folly. Study of crowd psychology and mass mania."
  • ""First published in 1841, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is often cited as the best book ever written about market psychology. This Harriman House edition includes Charles Mackay's account of the three infamous financial manias - John Law's Mississipi Scheme, the South Sea Bubble, and Tulipomania. Between the three of them, these historic episodes confirm that greed and fear have always been the driving forces of financial markets, and, furthermore, that being sensible and clever is no defence against the mesmeric allure of a popular craze with the wind behind it. In writing the history of the great financial manias, Charles Mackay proved himself a master chronicler of social as well as financial history."--Pub. description."@en
  • "First published in 1841, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is often cited as the best book ever written about market psychology. This Harriman House edition includes Charles Mackay's account of the three infamous financial manias - John Law's Mississipi Scheme, the South Sea Bubble, and Tulipomania. Between the three of them, these historic episodes confirm that greed and fear have always been the driving forces of financial markets, and, furthermore, that being sensible and clever is no defence against the mesmeric allure of a popular craze with the wind behind it. In writing the history of the great financial manias, Charles Mackay proved himself a master chronicler of social as well as financial history. Blessed with a cast of characters that covered all the vices, gifted a passage of events which was inevitably heading for disaster, and with the benefit of hindsight, he produced a record that is at once a riveting thriller and absorbing historical document. A century and a half later, it is as vibrant and lurid as the day it was written. For modern-day investors, still reeling from the dotcom crash, the moral of the popular manias scarcely needs spelling out. When the next stock market bubble comes along, as it surely will, you are advised to recall the plight of some of the unfortunates on these pages, and avoid getting dragged under the wheels of the careering bandwagon yourself."
  • "First published 1841 and 1852 respectively. Encompasses a range of manias and deceptions, from witch burnings to the great Crusades to the prophecies of Nostradamus."
  • "First published in 1841, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is often cited as the best book ever written about market psychology. This Harriman House edition includes Charles Mackay's account of the three infamous financial manias - John Law's Mississipi Scheme, the South Sea Bubble, and Tulipomania."
  • "Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is a history of popular folly by Charles Mackay. The book chronicles its targets in three parts: ""National Delusions, "" ""Peculiar Follies, "" and ""Philosophical Delusions."" Learn why intelligent people do amazingly stupid things when caught up in speculative edevorse. The subjects of Mackay's debunking include alchemy, beards (influence of politics and religion on), witch-hunts, crusades, and duels. Present day writers on economics, such as Andrew Tobias, laud the three chapters on economic bubbles."@en

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  • "Early works"
  • "Early works"@en
  • "Early works."@en
  • "Early works."
  • "History"
  • "History"@en
  • "Electronic books."@en
  • "Electronic books."

http://schema.org/name

  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds /"
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds /"@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds, with a foreword by Bernard M. Baruch."
  • "Confusion de confusiones"@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds."@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds."
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions :"@en
  • "Confusión de confusiones"@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds / [Charles Mackay] . Confusión de confusiones / [Joseph de la Vega] /"
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds. : With facsim. title pages and reproductions of original illus. from the editions of 1841 and 1852 /"
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions & the madness of crowds /"@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions & the madness of crowds /"
  • "Popular delusions and the madness of crowds"@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds, /"
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds : with facsimile title pages and reproductions of original ilustrations from the editions of 1841 and 1852 /"
  • "Memoirs of extraordinary popular delusions"
  • "Memoirs of extraordinary popular delusions"@en
  • "Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds"
  • "Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds"@en
  • "Memoirs of extraordinary popular delusions."
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions, and, The madness of crowds /"
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions : and the madness of crowds. /"
  • "Memoirs of extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds /"
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds : :and confusion de confusiones /"@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions & the madness of crowds : with facsimile title pages and reproductions of original illustrations from the editions of 1841 and 1852 /"
  • "Madness of crowds"
  • "Popular delusions"@en
  • "Popular delusions and the madness of crowds."
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds,"@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds,"
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds"
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds"@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions : and the madness of crowds /"@en
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds : [financial panics & manias] /"@en
  • "Memoirs of extraordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds."
  • "Extraordinary popular deslusions and the madness of crowds and confusion de Confusiones /"
  • "Extraordinary popular delusions and the Madness of Crowds /"

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