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Do you speak American? Episode 1

Examines sociolinguistic questions and the dynamic state of American English, a language rich in regional variety, strong in global impact, and steeped in cultural controversy.

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http://schema.org/alternateName

  • "Down South"@en
  • "Down South"
  • "Up North"@en
  • "Out West"@en
  • "Down south"
  • "Do you speak American?"

http://schema.org/description

  • "Follows Robert MacNeil as he travels down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Appalachia, Louisiana Cajun country, and the Tex-Mex border to examine Southern dialects and accents and the influences of French and Spanish on American English. Linguist Walt Wolfram, columnist Molly Ivins, pop country singer Cody James, and others talk about regional differences in vernacular, the steady displacement of Southern coastal dialect by inland dialect, the accents of JFK and LBJ, and the Texas border town of El Cenizo, where Spanish is the official language. Includes recordings of Eudora Welty and Appalachian storyteller Ray Hicks, as well as WPA recordings from around 1940."
  • "Follows Robert MacNeil as he travels down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Appalachia, Louisiana Cajun country, and the Tex-Mex border to examine Southern dialects and accents and the influences of French and Spanish on American English. Linguist Walt Wolfram, columnist Molly Ivins, pop country singer Cody James, and others talk about regional differences in vernacular, the steady displacement of Southern coastal dialect by inland dialect, the accents of JFK and LBJ, and the Texas border town of El Cenizo, where Spanish is the official language. Includes recordings of Eudora Welty and Appalachian storyteller Ray Hicks, as well as WPA recordings from around 1940."
  • "Examines sociolinguistic questions and the dynamic state of American English, a language rich in regional variety, strong in global impact, and steeped in cultural controversy."@en
  • "Examines sociolinguistic questions and the dynamic state of American English, a language rich in regional variety, strong in global impact, and steeped in cultural controversy."
  • "Examines sociolinguistic questions and the dynamic state of American English, a language rich in regional variety, strong in global impact, and steeped in cultural controversy. Episode one discusses linguistic dialect zones, the tension between prescriptivism and descriptivism, the impact of dialect on grapholect, the northern cities vowel shift, the roots of African-American English, minority linguistic profiling, biases against nonstandard speech, and the general perception of the U.S. Midland dialect as "normal American." Looks at hip-hop street talk, IM slang, Pittsburghese, and Gullah and Geechee. Episode two reviews Southern dialects and accents and the influences of French and Spanish on American English. Examines regional differences in vernacular, the steady displacement of Southern coastal dialect by inland dialect, the accents of JFK and LBJ, and the Texas border town of El Cenizo, where Spanish is the official language. Episode three looks at Spanglish, Chicano, Ebonics, and "Surfer Dude." Discusses the implications of voice-activation technology, opinions on the role of Spanish in the U.S., why teens create their own language, gay self-empowerment by redefining discriminatory terms, the oo-fronting sound shift, and whether technology will reinforce or weaken racial and regional stereotypes."@en
  • "Examines sociolinguistic questions and the dynamic state of American English, a language rich in regional variety, strong in global impact, and steeped in cultural controversy. Episode one discusses linguistic dialect zones, the tension between prescriptivism and descriptivism, the impact of dialect on grapholect, the northern cities vowel shift, the roots of African-American English, minority linguistic profiling, biases against nonstandard speech, and the general perception of the U.S. Midland dialect as "normal American." Looks at hip-hop street talk, IM slang, Pittsburghese, and Gullah and Geechee. Episode two reviews Southern dialects and accents and the influences of French and Spanish on American English. Examines regional differences in vernacular, the steady displacement of Southern coastal dialect by inland dialect, the accents of JFK and LBJ, and the Texas border town of El Cenizo, where Spanish is the official language. Episode three looks at Spanglish, Chicano, Ebonics, and "Surfer Dude." Discusses the implications of voice-activation technology, opinions on the role of Spanish in the U.S., why teens create their own language, gay self-empowerment by redefining discriminatory terms, the oo-fronting sound shift, and whether technology will reinforce or weaken racial and regional stereotypes."
  • "This program follows Robert MacNeil down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Appalachia, Louisiana Cajun country, and the Tex-Mex border to examine Southern dialects and accents and the influences of French and Spanish on American English. Linguist Walt Wolfram, columnist Molly Ivins, pop country singer Cody James, and others talk about regional differences in vernacular, the steady displacement of Southern coastal dialect by inland dialect, the accents of JFK and LBJ, and the Texas border town of El Cenizo, where Spanish is the official language. Recordings of Eudora Welty and Appalachian storyteller Ray Hicks are included, as well as WPA recordings from around 1940. (57 minutes)."
  • "Examines sociolinguistic questions and the dynamic state of American English, a language rich in regional variety, strong in global impact and steeped in cultural controversy."
  • "Why is the English spoken by Maine lobstermen so different from the English spoken by Texas cowboys? What constitutes "standard English" in the U.S. today? Will Spanish displace English altogether? And how is English linked to issues of race, gender, and class? In this three-part series, celebrated journalist and writer Robert MacNeil travels from north to south, east to west, to answer these and other sociolinguistic questions as he studies the ongoing evolution of American English, a language rich in regional variety, strong in global impact, and steeped in cultural controversy."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Nonfiction television programs"@en
  • "Documentary films"
  • "Television programs"@en
  • "Educational television programs"@en
  • "Video recordings for the hearing impaired"@en
  • "History"@en
  • "Video recordings for the hearing impaired"
  • "Internet videos"@en
  • "Documentary television programs"@en
  • "Documentary television programs"
  • "Films for the hearing impaired"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Do you speak American? [Episode 2]"
  • "Do you speak American? Episode 1"@en
  • "Do you speak American? Episode 3"@en
  • "Do you speak American"
  • "Do you speak American?"
  • "Do you speak American?"@en
  • "Do you speak American? Episode 2"@en
  • "Do you speak American? Episode 2"