WorldCat Linked Data Explorer

http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/51205100

Howl, and other poems /

"Allen Ginsberg's Howl and Other Poems was originally published by City Lights Books in the Fall of 1956. Subsequently seized by U.S. customs and the San Francisco police, it was the subject of a long court trial at which a series of poets and professors persuaded the court that the book was not obscene". --Back cover.

Open All Close All

http://schema.org/about

http://schema.org/description

  • ""Allen Ginsberg's Howl and Other Poems was originally published by City Lights Books in the Fall of 1956. Subsequently seized by U.S. customs and the San Francisco police, it was the subject of a long court trial at which a series of poets and professors persuaded the court that the book was not obscene". --Back cover."@en
  • "The prophetic poem that launched a generation when it was first published in 1956. When the book arrived from its British printers, it was seized almost immediately by U.S. Customs, and shortly thereafter the San Francisco police arrested its publisher and editor, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, together with City Lights Bookstore manager Shigeyoshi Murao. The two of them were charged with disseminating obscene literature, and the case went to trial in the municipal court of Judge Clayton Horn. A parade of distinguished literary and academic witnesses persuaded the judge that the title poem was indeed not obscene and that it had "redeeming social significance." Thus was Howl and Other Poems freed to become the single most influential poetic work of the post World War II era.--From publisher description."@en
  • "The prophetic poem that launched a generation when it was first published in 1956 is here presented in a commemorative 40th Anniversary Edition. When the book arrived from its British printers, it was seized almost immediately by U.S. Customs, and shortly thereafter the San Francisco police arrested its publisher and editor, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, together with the City Lights Bookstore manager, Shigeyoshi Murao. The two of them were charged with disseminating obscene literature, and the case went to trial in the Municipal Court of Judge Clayton Horn. A parade of distinguished literary and academic witnesses persuaded the judge that the title poem was indeed not obscene and that it had "redeeming social significance." Thus was Howl and Other Poems freed to become the single most influential poetic work of the post World War II era, with over 800,000 copies now in print."
  • "Ginsberg's 1956 collection of poems created a sensation, becoming the subject of an obscenity trial and changing the literary landscape forever."
  • "Ginsberg's love for a man with whom he shared some of life's worst experiences is celebrated in poems which were once the subject of a prolonged court trial."
  • ""The epigraph for Howl is from Walt Whitman: 'Unscrew the locks from the doors!/Unscrew the doors themselves from their jambs!' Announcing his intentions with this ringing motto, Allen Ginsberg published a volume of poetry which broke so many social taboos that copies were impounded as obscene, and the publisher, poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, was arrested. The court case that followed found for Ginsberg and his publisher, and the publicity made both the poet and the book famous. Ginsberg went on from this beginning to become a cultural icon of sixties radicalism. This works seminal place in the culture is indicated in Czeslaw Milosz's poetic tribute to Ginsberg: 'Your blasphemous howl still resounds in a neon desert where the human tribe wanders, sentenced to unreality'."--PUBLISHER."@en
  • "A collection of poems originally published in 1956 by beat generation poet Allen Ginsberg."@en
  • "From the Publisher: The prophetic poem that launched a generation when it was first published in 1965 is here presented in a commemorative fortieth Anniversary Edition. When the book arrived from its British printers, it was seized almost immediately by U.S. Customs, and shortly thereafter the San Francisco police arrested its publisher and editor, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, together with City Lights Bookstore manager Shigeyoshi Murao. The two of them were charged with disseminating obscene literature, and the case went to trial in the municipal court of Judge Clayton Horn. A parade of distinguished literary and academic witnesses persuaded the judge that the title poem was indeed not obscene and that it had "redeeming social significance." Thus was Howl and Other Poems freed to become the single most influential poetic work of the post World War II era."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Poetry"
  • "Poetry"@en
  • "Specimens"@en
  • "Inscriptions (Provenance)"
  • "Genres littéraires."
  • "Poetry."
  • "Poetry."@en
  • "Proofs (Printing)"

http://schema.org/name

  • "Howl and other poems"
  • "Howl, and other poems /"@en
  • "Howl, and other poems /"
  • "Howl and others poems /"
  • "Milford copy of Howl."@en
  • "Howl : and other poems."
  • "Howl : and other poems."@en
  • "Howl and other Poems /"
  • "Howl, and other poems. (Eighth printing.)."
  • "Howl, and other poems /by Allen Ginsberg."@en
  • "Howl, and other poems"@en
  • "Howl, and other poems"
  • "Howl : and other poems /"
  • "Howl : and other poems /"@en
  • "Howl and other poems /"@en
  • "Howl and other poems /"
  • "Howl"@en
  • "Howl and other poems."
  • "Howl and other poems./"@en
  • "Howl, and other poems."@en
  • "Howl, and other poems."
  • "Howl."@en
  • "Howl et autres poèmes"

http://schema.org/workExample