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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/597571

World Christianity and Marxism

Attempt to give an account of world Christianity's encounter with Marxism in the post Cold War period. It explores the intellectual foundations of the antagonism on both sides and the particular contexts of the USSR, the United States, Poland, Nicaragua, Albania, Cuba and China and suggests that the 'Marxist project' is not yet dead.

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http://schema.org/description

  • "Attempt to give an account of world Christianity's encounter with Marxism in the post Cold War period. It explores the intellectual foundations of the antagonism on both sides and the particular contexts of the USSR, the United States, Poland, Nicaragua, Albania, Cuba and China and suggests that the 'Marxist project' is not yet dead."@en
  • "This text represents a unified and comprehensive attempt in the post-Cold War period to give an account of world Christianity's encounter with Marxism. After exploring the intellectual foundations of the antagonism on both sides, the author examines the particular contexts of the USSR, the United States, Poland, Nicaragua, Albania, Cuba, and China, and suggests that the "Marxist project" is not as dead as one might imagine."@en
  • "Denis Janz argues that the encounter with Marxism has been the defining event for twentieth-century Christianity. No other worldview shook Christianity more dramatically and no other movement had as profound an impact on so many. Now the Cold War is over and as we approach the end of the century we need, Janz says, to ask ourselves what happened. All the diverse philosophical and political manifestations of Marxism were ultimately rooted in Marx's thought, and supporters based their greater or lesser hostilities toward Christianity on their reading of his critique. Janz follows this with an overview of Christian responses to Marx, extending from the mid-19th century to the onset of the Cold War. He argues that within this time frame Christianity's negation of Marx was not absolute; the loud "no" to Marx bore with it an important, if muted, "yes." With this intellectual groundwork in place, Janz turns to an examination of the encounter as it unfolded in specific national contexts: the United States, the Soviet Union, Poland, Nicaragua, Cuba, China, and Albania. From this survey emerges the evidence that world Christianity has clearly internalized some of the prominent features of its antagonist, suggesting that the "Marxist project" is not as utterly defunct as many have assumed."

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  • "Ressources Internet"
  • "Livre électronique (Descripteur de forme)"
  • "Ressource Internet (Descripteur de forme)"
  • "History"
  • "History"@en
  • "Electronic books"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "World christianity and marxism"
  • "World Christianity and Marxism"
  • "World Christianity and Marxism"@en