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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/63141287

Animal, vegetable, miracle

When Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. "Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we'd know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them."--Publisher description.

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http://schema.org/description

  • "When Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. "Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we'd know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them."--Publisher description."@en
  • "Barbara Kingsolver tells how she and her family relocated to southern Appalachia after suffering through years of drought in Arizona. Their purpose was to "live in a place that could feed us" by growing their own food and living among a community of local organic food growers. Animal, Vegetable, Miracle follows the family through the first year of their experiment to realign their lives with the local food chain. They find themselves eager to move away from the typical food scenario of American families: a refrigerator packed with processed, factory-farmed foods transported long distances using nonrenewable fuels. In their search for another way to eat and live, they begin to recover what Kingsolver considers our nation's lost appreciation for the American family farm."@en
  • "Barbara Kingsolver and her family sweep readers along on their journey away from the industrial-food pipeline to a rural lie in which they vow to buy only food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves or learn to live without it. Their good-humored search yields surprising discoveries about turkey sex life and overly zealous zucchini plants, en route to a food cullture that's better for the neighborhood and also better on the table."@en
  • "When Barbara Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally-produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume."@en
  • "In this seamless diary narrative, best-selling author Barbara Kingsolver tells how she and her family relocated to southern Appalachia after suffering through years of drought in Arizona. Their purpose was to "live in a place that could feed us" by growing their own food and living among a community of local organic food growers."
  • "When Barbara Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally-produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume.Animal, Vegetable, Miracle follows the family through the first year of their experiment. They find themselves eager to move away from the all too familiar scenario of most families: a refrigerator packed with processed, factory farmed foods transported long distances using nonrenewable fuels. Believing that most of us have better options available, Kingsolver and her family set out to prove for themselves that a local diet is not just better for the economy and environment, but also better on the table. Their search leads them through a season of planting, pulling weeds, expanding their kitchen skills and harvesting their own animals."
  • "Kingsolver and her family sweep readers along on their journey away from the industrial-food pipeline to a rural life in which they vow to buy only food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it. Their good-humored search yields surprising discoveries about turkey sex life and overly zealous zucchini plants, en route to a food culture that's better for the neighborhood and also better on the table."@en
  • "When Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. "Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we'd know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them.""
  • "When Barbara Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally-produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. "Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we'd know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them." Animal, vegetable, miracle follows the family through the first year of their experiment. They find themselves eager to move away from the typical food scenario of American families: a refrigerator packed with processed, factory-farmed foods transported long distances using nonrenewable fuels. In their search for another way to eat and live, they begin to recover what Kingsolver considers our nation's lost appreciation for farms and the natural processes of food production."
  • "When Barbara Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally-produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. "Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we'd know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them." Animal, vegetable, miracle follows the family through the first year of their experiment. They find themselves eager to move away from the typical food scenario of American families: a refrigerator packed with processed, factory-farmed foods transported long distances using nonrenewable fuels. In their search for another way to eat and live, they begin to recover what Kingsolver considers our nation's lost appreciation for farms and the natural processes of food production."@en
  • "Biographies and Autobiographies."
  • "When [the author] and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. "Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we'd know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them.""
  • "Barbara Kingsolver tells how she and her family relocated to southern Appalachia after suffering through years of drought in Arizona. Their purpose was to "live in a place that could feed us" by growing their own food and living among a community of local organic food growers."
  • "When Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. "Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we'd know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them."--From publisher description."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Audiobooks"
  • "Audiobooks"@en
  • "Sound recordings"@en
  • "Reality memoirs"@en
  • "Anecdotes"
  • "Anecdotes"@en
  • "Food memoirs"@en
  • "Compact discs"@en
  • "Compact discs"
  • "Downloadable audio books"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Animal, vegetable, miracle : a year of food life"
  • "Animal, vegetable, miracle"@en
  • "Animal, vegetable, miracle"
  • "Animal, vegetable, miracle a year of food life"
  • "Animal, vegetable, miracle a year of food life"@en
  • "Animal, vegetable, miracle [a year of food life]"
  • "Animal, vegetable, miracle [a year of food life]"@en