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Night and Day

Katharine Hilbery is beautiful and privileged, but uncertain of her future. She must choose between becoming engaged to the oddly prosaic poet William Rodney, and her dangerous attraction to the passionate Ralph Denham. As she struggles to decide, the lives of two other women - women's rights activist Mary Datchet and Katharine's mother, Margaret, struggling to weave together the documents, events and memories of her own father's life into a biography - impinge on hers with unexpected and intriguing consequences. Virginia Woolf's delicate second novel is both a love story and a soc.

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  • "Night & day"
  • "Uniform edition of the works of Virginia Woolf"
  • "Works"

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  • "Katharine Hilbery is beautiful and privileged, but uncertain of her future. She must choose between becoming engaged to the oddly prosaic poet William Rodney, and her dangerous attraction to the passionate Ralph Denham. As she struggles to decide, the lives of two other women - women's rights activist Mary Datchet and Katharine's mother, Margaret, struggling to weave together the documents, events and memories of her own father's life into a biography - impinge on hers with unexpected and intriguing consequences. Virginia Woolf's delicate second novel is both a love story and a soc."@en
  • "Overview: Night and Day, Virginia Woolf's second novel, is both a love story and a social comedy in the tradition of Jane Austen; yet it also questions that tradition, recognizing that the goals of society and the individual may not necessarily coincide. At its centre is Katharine Hilbery, the beautiful grand-daughter of a great Victorian poet. She must choose between becoming engaged to the oddly prosaic poet William Rodney and her attraction to Ralph Denham, with whom she feels a more profound and disturbing affinity. Katharine's hesitation is vividly contrasted with the approach of her friend Mary Datchet, dedicated to the Women's Rights movement. The ensuing complications are underlined and to some extent unravelled by Katharine's mother, Mrs Hilbery, whose struggles to weave together the known documents, events and memories of her father's life into a coherent biography reflect Woolf's own sense of the unique and elusive nature of experience."
  • "Katharine Hilbery, torn between past and present, is a figure reflecting Woolf's own struggle with history. Both have illustrious literary ancestors: in Katharine's case, her poet grandfather, and in Woolf's, her father Leslie Stephen, writer, philosopher, and editor. Both desire to break away from the demands of the previous generation without disowning it altogether. Katharine must decide whether or not she loves the iconoclastic Ralph Denham; Woolf seeks a way of experimenting with the novel form that still allows her to express her affection for the literature of the past. Night and Day is the most traditional of Woolf's novels, yet even here we can see her beginning to break free; in this, her second novel, with its strange mixture of comedy and high seriousness, Woolf had already found her own characteristic voice."
  • "Set in Edwardian London, Night and day contrasts the lives of two friends, Katherine Hilbery and Mary Datchet. Katherine is the bored, frustrated granddaughter of an eminent English poet. She lives at her parents' home and is engaged to a prig who exemplifies the stultifying life from which she wishes to be free, until she meets a possible avenue of escape in the person of Ralph Denham. Mary Datchet, on the other hand, represents an alternative to marriage -- she has been to college, lives on her own, and finds fulfillment in working for the women's rights movement. As the story dances delightfully among the novel's brilliantly drawn characters, serious questions about the nature of romance arise. Is love real or illusory? Can love and marriage coexist? Is love necessary for happiness?"@en
  • "Set in London before World War I, this novel explores the truth of feelings and particularly the nature of love. It is, in that sense, a love story, but in the hands of Virginia Woolf, it transcends conventional romance to pose a series of crucial questions about women, intellectual freedom, and marriage. -Amazon.com."@en
  • "Night and day, Virginia Woolf's second novel, is both a love story and a social comedy in the tradition of Jane Austen; yet it also questions that tradition, recognizing that the goals of society and the individual may not necessarily coincide. At its center is Katharine Hilbery, the beautiful grand-daughter of a great Victorian poet. She must choose between becoming engaged to the oddly prosaic poet William Rodney and her attraction to Ralph Denham, with whom she feels a more profound and disturbing affinity. Katharine's hesitation is vividly contrasted with the approach of her friend Mary Datchet, dedicated to the Women's Rights movement. The ensuing complications are underlined and to some extent unravelled by Katharine's mother, Mrs Hilbery, whose struggles to weave together the known documents, events and memories of her father's life into a coherent biography reflect Woolf's own sense of the unique and elusive nature of experience."
  • "Set in Edwardian London, Night and Day contrasts the daily lives and romantic attachments of two acquaintances, Katharine Hilbery and Mary Datchet. The novel examines the relationships between love, marriage, happiness, and success."@en
  • "The lives of two friends are contrasted in Edwardian London. Katharine Hillbery is the bored, frustrated granddaughter of an eminent English poet. She lives at her parents' home and is engaged to a prig who exemplifies the stultifying life from which she wishes to be free, until she meets a possible avenue of escape in the person of Ralph Denham. Mary Dathcet, on the other hand, represents an alternative to marriage -- she has been to college, lives on her own, and finds fulfillment in working for the women's rights movement. As we watch the lives of these two young women, questions about the nature of romance arise. Is love real or illusory? Can love and marriage coexist? Is love necessary for happiness?"
  • "Insightful yet fun, Woolf's story depicts the dance of romance between couples and a young woman's struggle for identity through mind and heart. Katherine Hilbery is torn between past and present ... she has illustrious literary ancestors, including her poet grandfather. She desires to break away from the demands of the previous generation without disowning it altogether. Katherine must decide whether or not she loves the iconoclastic Ralph Denham. Woolf portrays the fascinations of self-discovery through relationships with other people while looking into the intricacies of love--are we aware of love? What is the importance of love in a person's life? Does one need it to be happy?"
  • "Katharine Hilbery, from a multiply-talented, artistic, and well-known family, comes together with Ralph Denham, the upwardly striving eldest son of a large middle-class family."@en
  • "Katharine Hilbery, the beautiful grand-daughter of a great Victorian poet, must choose between becoming engaged to the oddly prosaic poet William Rodney and her attraction to Ralph Denham, with whom she feels a more profound and disturbing affinity."
  • "Katharine Hilbery, the beautiful grand-daughter of a great Victorian poet, must choose between becoming engaged to the oddly prosaic poet William Rodney and her attraction to Ralph Denham, with whom she feels a more profound and disturbing affinity."@en
  • "A bold experiment in modernist fiction, Virginia Woolf's novel Night and Day is a study in contrasts. The narrative ricochets between the lives and thoughts of two friends, Katharine Hilbery and Mary Datchet, using the stark differences and points of similarity between them to construct an engrossingly complex and detailed portrait and social commentary."@en
  • "Night and Day, Virginia Woolf's second novel, is both a love story and a social comedy in the tradition of Jane Austen; yet it also questions that tradition, recognizing that the goals of society and the individual may not necessarily coincide. At its centre is Katharine Hilbery, the beautiful grand-daughter of a great Victorian poet. She must choose between becoming engaged to the oddly prosaic poet William Rodney and her attraction to Ralph Denham, with whom she feels a more profound and disturbing affinity. Katharine's hesitation is vividly contrasted with the approach of her friend Mary Datchet, dedicated to the Women's Rights movement. The ensuing complications are underlined and to some extent unravelled by Katharine's mother, Mrs Hilbery, whose struggles to weave together the known documents, events and memories of her father's life into a coherent biography reflect Woolf's own sense of the unique and elusive nature of experience."
  • "Woolf's second novel depicts the dance of romance between couples and a young woman's struggle for identity through mind and heart. Katharine Hilbery, the gifted daughter of a distinguished literary family, feels trapped in an environment which will not allow her to express herself. Looking at the questions raised by love and marriage, Night and Day paints an unforgettable picture of the London intelligentsia before the First World War."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Novels"
  • "Love stories"@en
  • "Love stories"
  • "Historical fiction"
  • "Historical fiction"@en
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Erzählende Literatur"
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Powieść angielska"
  • "Domestic fiction"
  • "Domestic fiction"@en
  • "Autographs (Provenance)"
  • "Genres littéraires"

http://schema.org/name

  • "Night and Day"@en
  • "Night and Day"
  • "Night and day. Virginia Woolf"
  • "Night & Day"
  • "Night and day"@en
  • "Night and day"
  • "Night and day : novel"

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