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Stress Portrait of a Killer

Over the last three decades, science has been advancing our understanding of stress-how it impacts our bodies and how our social standing can make us more or less susceptible. ??From baboon troops on the plains of Africa, to neuroscience labs at Stanford University, scientists are revealing just how lethal stress can be. Research reveals that the impact of stress can be found deep within us, shrinking our brains, adding fat to our bellies, even unraveling our chromosomes. ??Yet understanding how stress works can help us figure out ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague. In Stress: Portrait of a Killer, scientific discoveries in the field and in the lab prove that stress is not a state of mind, but something measurable and dangerous.

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  • "National Geographic"
  • "Portrait of a killer"@en
  • "Portrait of a killer"
  • "Portrait of a Killer"@en

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  • "Stress-related diseases are some of the biggest killers in modern developed society, yet we know little about their root cause. That all changes in this unprecedented look at the revelatory science, based on the latest research by pioneering scientists including neurobiologist Robert Sapolsky, a professor at Stanford University. For over a quater of a century he has been fascinated by why some people are crushed by stress while others seem to thrive on it. -- Container."
  • "Over the last three decades, science has been advancing our understanding of stress-how it impacts our bodies and how our social standing can make us more or less susceptible. ??From baboon troops on the plains of Africa, to neuroscience labs at Stanford University, scientists are revealing just how lethal stress can be. Research reveals that the impact of stress can be found deep within us, shrinking our brains, adding fat to our bellies, even unraveling our chromosomes. ??Yet understanding how stress works can help us figure out ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague. In Stress: Portrait of a Killer, scientific discoveries in the field and in the lab prove that stress is not a state of mind, but something measurable and dangerous."@en
  • "Examines the effects of stress on the human body, including how people becomes susceptible to it, and discusses ways of understanding how stress can be avoided."
  • "Over the last three decades, science has been advancing the understanding of stress-how it impacts the human body and how social standing can make a person more or less susceptible. Through studies of baboons on the plains of Africa and research in the neuroscience labs of Stanford University, scientists are discovering just how lethal stress can be. Understanding how stress works can help people figure out ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague. As Stress: Portrait of a killer shows, stress is not just a state of mind; it's something measurable and dangerous."
  • "Stress-related diseases are some of the biggest killers in modern developed society, yet we know little about their root cause. That all changes in this unprecedented look at the revelatory science, based on the latest research by pioneering scientists including neurobiologist Robert Sapolsky, a professor at Stanford University. For over a quarter of a century he has been fascinated by why some people are crushed by stress while others seem to thrive on it. Sapolsky divides his time between his brain laboratory at Stanford and his fieldwork in the Serengeti plains of East Africa. It turns out baboons provide an astonishingly close model to humans - at least where stress is concerned. Like us, they only spend a few hours a day satisfying their primary need - food - which leaves them at least three times that amount of time to get on each other's nerves...again, just like us. Sapolsky acts as a scientific detective, piecing together a fascinating case on how stress works its deadly magic: first, how stress attacks cells, then how each individual reacts, and finally how society impacts on stress."
  • "A series of laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that stress, long thought to be an exclusively psychological phenomenon, is measurable and dangerous on a physical level. Stanford neurobiologist Dr. Robert Sapolsky studied baboons (Papio) on the Masai Mara Reserve in Kenya, measuring their levels of stress hormones caused by social hierarchies. Sapolsky found that the hormones adrenaline and glucocorticoid increase in subordinate troop members, and dominant males had significantly lower blood pressure and heart rates. Also working with nonhuman primate models, Dr. Carol Shively of Wake Forest University examined the arteries of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Corroborating Sapolsky's findings, Shively demonstrated that subordinate macaques have higher plaque levels in arteries, potentially increasing the risk for heart attack. These results were compared to a long-term human study, directed by Sir Michael Marmot of the University of London Medical School. Tracking the health of British Civil Servants, Marmot found that that humans lower in the workplace hierarchy had higher stress levels, and higher rates of sickness. Several researchers took these results a step further, focusing in on how stress affects mothers. Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn and Dr. Elissa Epel of the University of California-San Francisco found that chronic high stress in mothers shortened telomeres in chromosomes, potentially producing lifelong consequences. In all of these studies, researchers found that stress and its harmful effects can be reduced by social interaction, and that grooming, playing, and equal social rank in nonhuman primates produced positive health effects."@en
  • "Stanford University neurobiologist, Robert Sapolsky, has been advancing our understanding of stress - how it impacts our bodies and how our social standing can make us more or less susceptible. Research reveals that the impact of stress can be found deep within us, shrinking our brains, adding fat to our bellies, even unraveling our chromosomes. Yet understanding how stress works can help us figure out a ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague."@en
  • "Over the last three decades, science has been advancing the understanding of stress-how it impacts the human body and how social standing can make a person more or less susceptible. Through studies of baboons on the plains of Africa and research in the neuroscience labs of Stanford University, scientists are discovering just how lethal stress can be. Understanding how stress works can help people figure out ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague. As Stress: Portrait of a Killer shows, stress is not just a state of mind; it's something measurable and dangerous."@en
  • "A Stanford University neurobiologist has been advancing our understanding of stress - how it impacts our bodies and how our social standing can make us more or less susceptible. Research reveals that the impact of stress can be found deep within us, shrinking our brains, adding fat to our bellies, even unraveling our chromosomes. Yet understanding how stress works can help us figure out a ways to combat it and how to live a life free of the tyranny of this contemporary plague."
  • "A series of laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that stress, long thought to be an exclusively psychological phenomenon, is measurable and dangerous on a physical level. Stanford neurobiologist Dr. Robert Sapolsky studied baboons (Papio) on the Masai Mara Reserve in Kenya, measuring their levels of stress hormones caused by social hierarchies. Sapolsky found that the hormones adrenaline and glucocorticoid increase in subordinate troop members, and dominant males had significantly lower blood pressure and heart rates. Also working with nonhuman primate models, Dr. Carol Shively of Wake Forest University examined the arteries of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Corroborating Sapolsky's findings, Shively demonstrated that subordinate macaques have higher plaque levels in arteries, potentially increasing the risk for heart attack. These results were compared to a long-term human study, directed by Sir Michael Marmot of the University of London Medical School. Tracking the health of British Civil Servants, Marmot found that humans lower in the workplace hierarchy had higher stress levels, and higher rates of sickness. Several researchers took these results a step further, focusing in on how stress affects mothers. Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn and Dr. Elissa Epel of the University of California-San Francisco found that chronic high stress in mothers shortened telomeres in chromosomes, potentially producing lifelong consequences. In all of these studies, researchers found that stress and its harmful effects can be reduced by social interaction, and that grooming, playing, and equal social rank in nonhuman primates produced positive health effects."

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  • "Television programs for the hearing impaired"
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  • "Stress Portrait of a Killer"@en
  • "Stress : portrait of a killer"
  • "Stress portrait of a killer"
  • "Stress portrait of a killer"@en
  • "Stress : Portrait of a Killer"
  • "Stress : Portrait of a Killer"@en