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4 little girls

"Spike Lee's Oscar nominated 1997 documentary recalls the bombing that took the lives of four children at 16th Street Church in Birmingham, Ala., on Sept. 15, 1963. Relatives and friends of the victims offer their perspectives on the tragedy; and political leaders and civil-rights advocates reflect on the 'traditional Old South racism' that provoked the disaster. More than 40 people are interviewed, among them George Wallace, Bill Cosby, Jesse Jackson and Walter Cronkite, who describes how the bombing led 'America [to understand] the real nature of the hate that was preventing integration"--TV guide, Feb. 23, 1998.

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  • ""The Birmingham Campaign was launched in 1963. Martin Luther King Jr. and other activists were soon jailed ... but it was the participation of the children that advanced the momentum of the Birmingham movement. They marched alongside the adults and were taken to jail with them as well. The 16th St. Baptist Church was close to the downtown area, it was an ideal location to hold rallies and meetings. On Sunday morning, Sept. 15, 1963, dynamite planted by the Ku Klux Klan, exploded in the building ... under the fallen debris the bodies of [four] girls were found--Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley died because of the color of their skin."--Container."
  • ""Spike Lee's Oscar nominated 1997 documentary recalls the bombing that took the lives of four children at 16th Street Church in Birmingham, Ala., on Sept. 15, 1963. Relatives and friends of the victims offer their perspectives on the tragedy; and political leaders and civil-rights advocates reflect on the 'traditional Old South racism' that provoked the disaster. More than 40 people are interviewed, among them George Wallace, Bill Cosby, Jesse Jackson and Walter Cronkite, who describes how the bombing led 'America [to understand] the real nature of the hate that was preventing integration"--TV guide, Feb. 23, 1998."@en
  • "The Birmingham Campaign was launched in 1963 by Martin Luther King. The 16th Street Baptist Church was close to the downtown area in an ideal location to hold rallies and meetings. On Sunday morning, 15th September 1963, dynamite planted by the Ku Klux Klan exploded in the building. Under the debris, the bodies of four girls were found ... Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthis Wesley. Combines archival footage and interviews with survivors, witnesses, community leaders and the victims' families and friends."@en
  • "The Birmingham campaign was launched in 1963. Martin Luther King Jr. and other activists were soon jailed...but it was the participation of the children that advanced the momentum of the Birmingham movement. They marched alongside the adults and were taken to jail with them as well. The 16th St. Baptist Church was close to the downtown area, it was an ideal location to hold rallies and meetings. On Sunday morning, Sept.15, 1963, dynamite planted by the Ku Klux Klan, exploded in the building...under the fallen debris the bodies of 4 girls were found - Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley died because of the color of their skin."
  • "Documentary exploring the origins, events and aftermath of the bombing of a black Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama on 15th September 1963, which killed four children, Addie Mae Collins, Carol Denise McNair, Cynthia Wesley and Carole Rosamond Robertson."
  • "The events associated with the bombing of the 16th Street Baptish Church in Birmingham, Alabama on the Sunday Morning of September 15,1963. Four young girls were killed in the explosion. This was a pivotal event in the Civil Rights movemnet of the nineteen-sixties."
  • "he Birmingham Campaign was launched in 1963. Martin Luther King Jr. and other activists were soon jailed, but it was the participation of the children that advanced the momentum of the Birmingham movement. They marched alongside the adults and were taken to jail with them as well. Because the 16th St. Baptist Church was close to the downtown area, it was an ideal location to hold rallies and meetings. On Sunday morning, Sept. 15, 1963, dynamite planted by the Ku Klux Klan, exploded in the building. Under the fallen debris, the bodies of four girls were found. Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley died because of the color of their skin. Features archival film footage, home photographs, comments by surviving family members, and interviews with local and national figures of the time."@en
  • "When a bomb tears through the basement of a black Baptist church on a peaceful fall morning, it takes the lives of four young girls; Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, Cynthia Wesley and Addie Mae Collins. This racially motivated crime, taking place at a time when the civil rights movement is burning with a new flame, could have doused that flame forever. Instead it fuels a nation's outrage and brings Birmingham, Alabama to the forefront of America's concern."@en
  • ""Durante el apogeo del movimiento de derechos civiles en los años '60, ni siquiera las iglesias eran lugares totalmente seguros, el director de cine Spike Lee seleccionó el mostruoso bombardeo de la Iglesia Baptista de la Calle 16, en Birmingham, Alabama el 15 de septiembre de 1963 como el material para su primer documental, enlaza recuentos de la promesa que aguardaba a las cuatro niñas que murieron durante este ataque con secuencias que denotan la monstruosidad del racismo en el sur de los Estados Unidos durante esta epoca""
  • "A documentary of the notorious racial terrorist bombing of an African American church during the Civil Rights Movement."@en
  • "The Birmingham Campaign was launched in 1963. Martin Luther King Jr. and other activists were soon jailed, but it was the participation of the children that advanced the momentum of the Birmingham movement. They marched alongside the adults and were taken to jail with them as well. Because the 16th St. Baptist Church was close to the downtown area, it was an ideal location to hold rallies and meetings. On Sunday morning, Sept. 15, 1963, dynamite planted by the Ku Klux Klan, exploded in the building. Under the fallen debris, the bodies of four girls were found. Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley died because of the color of their skin. Features archival film footage, home photographs, comments by surviving family members, and interviews with local and national figures of the time."
  • "The Birmingham Campaign was launched in 1963 by Martin Luther King. The 16th Street Baptist Church was close to the downtown area in an ideal location to hold rallies and meetings. On Sunday morning, 15th September 1963, dynamite planted by the Ku Klux Klan exploded in the building. Under the debris, the bodies of four girls were found ... Denise McNair, Addie Mae Collins, Carole Robertson and Cynthis Wesley."
  • "Documents the events surrounding the 1963 bombing of an African American Baptist Church in Alabama, which resulted in the deaths of four young girls."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "History"@en
  • "History"
  • "Feature films."@en
  • "Nonfiction films."@en
  • "Documentary films."@en
  • "Documentary films."
  • "Black films and programs."@en
  • "Feature films"@en
  • "Video recordings for the hearing impaired."@en
  • "Video recordings for the hearing impaired."
  • "non fiction."
  • "Films for the hearing impaired."@en
  • "History."
  • "History."@en
  • "Emmy Award nominees."@en
  • "Documentaries and factual films and video."@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "4 little girls: the Birmingham bombing"
  • "4 Little girls /"
  • "4 little girls"
  • "4 little girls"@en
  • "Four little girls."
  • "Four little girls /"
  • "4 little girls /"@en
  • "Four little girls"@en
  • "Birmingham bombing"
  • "Four little girls"