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Ireland the politics of enmity, 1789-2006

The Anglo-Irish relationship has historically been a fraught one. The modern Irish question is defined by many as a case of a great and supposedly liberal nation supposedly mistreating a smaller one. The Politics of Enmity embodies a new approach to this issue, analysing key issues from religious discrimination, and famine, to the passions of both nationalism and unionism. Re-evaluating British political leadership and its approach towards Ireland, Paul Bew sheds new light. on the changing ideological passions of the modern Irish question. Examining the influence and legacies of many key figur.

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  • "The Anglo-Irish relationship has historically been a fraught one. The modern Irish question is defined by many as a case of a great and supposedly liberal nation supposedly mistreating a smaller one. The Politics of Enmity embodies a new approach to this issue, analysing key issues from religious discrimination, and famine, to the passions of both nationalism and unionism. Re-evaluating British political leadership and its approach towards Ireland, Paul Bew sheds new light. on the changing ideological passions of the modern Irish question. Examining the influence and legacies of many key figur."@en
  • "The modern Irish question is defined by many as a case of a great and supposedly liberal nation supposedly mistreating a smaller one. This text embodies a new approach to this issue, analysing key issues from religious discrimination and famine, to the passions of both nationalism and unionism."
  • "The French revolution had an electrifying impact on Irish society. The 1790s saw the birth of modern Irish republicanism and Orangeism, whose antagonism remains a defining feature of Irish political life. The 1790s also saw the birth of a new approach to Ireland within important elements of the British political elite, men like Pitt and Castlereagh. Strongly influenced by Edmund Burke, they argued that Britain's strategic interests were best served by a policy of catholic emancipation and political integration in Ireland. Britain's failure to achieve this objective, dramatized by the horrifying tragedy of the Irish famine of 1846-50, in which a million Irish died, set the context for the emergence of a popular mass nationalism, expressed in the Fenian, Parnell, and Sinn Fein movements, which eventually expelled Britain from the greater part of the island. -- Description from (Jan. 24, 2012)."

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  • "Ressources Internet"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "History"
  • "History"@en

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  • "Ireland : the politics of enmity, 1789-2006"
  • "Ireland the politics of enmity, 1789-2006"@en
  • "Ireland the politics of enmity, 1789-2006"
  • "Ireland : The politics of enmity 1789-2006"
  • "Ireland : the politics of enmity 1789 - 2006"
  • "Ireland : the politics of enmity 1789-2006"