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Why the west rules--for now the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future

Why did British boats shoot their way up the Yangzi in 1842, rather than Chinese ones up the Thames? Why do Easterners use English more than Europeans speak in Mandarin or Japanese? To put it bluntly, why does the West rule? There are two schools of thought: the 'Long-Term Lock-In' theory, suggesting some sort of inevitability, and the 'Short-Term Accident' theory. But both approaches have misunderstood the shape of history. Ian Morris presents a startling new theory, drawing on thousands of years of history and archaeology, and the methods of social science. He explains with flair and authori.

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  • ""Archaeologist and historian Ian Morris explains that Western dominance is largely the result of the effects of geography on the everyday efforts of ordinary people as they deal with crises of resources, disease, migration, and climate. As geography and human ingenuity continue to interact, however, the world over the next hundred years will subsequently change in astonishing ways, transforming Western rule in the process.""
  • "Why does the West rule? And with the rise of China and India, how long will its power last? In this critically-acclaimed bestseller, eminent historian and archaeologist Ian Morris provides provocative answers. Morris explains that only by exploring the whole of human civilisation can we see why development differed in the East and West. And only when we know this story - told here with unique flair and authority - can we predict the impact of the astonishing changes that face us. A gripping and truly history of the world, based on the latest research across disciplines from ancient history to neuroscience, "Why the West rules - for now" is already a modern classic. [4e de couv.]."
  • "Archaeologist and historian Ian Morris explains that Western dominance is largely the result of the effects of geography on the everyday efforts of ordinary people as they deal with crises of resources, disease, migration, and climate. As geography and human ingenuity continue to interact, however, the world over the next hundred years will subsequently change in astonishing ways, transforming Western rule in the process."
  • "Why did British boats shoot their way up the Yangzi in 1842, rather than Chinese ones up the Thames? Why do Easterners use English more than Europeans speak in Mandarin or Japanese? To put it bluntly, why does the West rule? There are two schools of thought: the 'Long-Term Lock-In' theory, suggesting some sort of inevitability, and the 'Short-Term Accident' theory. But both approaches have misunderstood the shape of history. Ian Morris presents a startling new theory, drawing on thousands of years of history and archaeology, and the methods of social science. He explains with flair and authori."@en
  • "Archaeologist and historian Ian Morris explains that Western dominance is largely the result of the effects of geography on the everyday efforts of ordinary people as they deal with crises of resources, disease, migration, and climate. As geography and human ingenuity continue to interact, however, the world over the next hundred years will subsequently change in astonishing ways, transforming Western rule in the process."
  • "Archaeologist and historian Ian Morris explains that Western dominance is largely the result of the effects of geography on the everyday efforts of ordinary people as they deal with crises of resources, disease, migration, and climate. As geography and human ingenuity continue to interact, however, the world over the next hundred years will subsequently change in astonishing ways, transforming Western rule in the process."@en
  • "A New York Times Notable Book for 2011 Sometime around 1750, English entrepreneurs unleashed the astounding energies of steam and coal, and the world was forever changed. The emergence of factories, railroads, and gunboats propelled the West's rise to power in the nineteenth century, and the development of computers and nuclear weapons in the twentieth century secured its global supremacy. Now, at the beginning of the twenty-first century, many worry that the emerging economic power of China and India spells the end of the West as a superpower. In order to understand this possibility, we need to look back in time. Why has the West dominated the globe for the past two hundred years, and will its power last' Describing the patterns of human history, the archaeologist and historian Ian Morris offers surprising new answers to both questions. It is not, he reveals, differences of race or culture, or even the strivings of great individuals, that explain Western dominance. It is the effects of geography on the everyday efforts of ordinary people as they deal with crises of resources, disease, migration, and climate. As geography and human ingenuity continue to interact, the world will change in astonishing ways, transforming Western rule in the process. Deeply researched and brilliantly argued, Why the West Rules'for Now spans fifty thousand years of history and offers fresh insights on nearly every page. The book brings together the latest findings across disciplines'from ancient history to neuroscience'not only to explain why the West came to rule the world but also to predict what the future will bring in the next hundred years."@en

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  • "Electronic books (Kindle)"
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  • "Electronic books"
  • "History"
  • "History"@en
  • "Geschiedenis (vorm)"@en

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  • "Why the West rules - for now the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the west rules--for now the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"@en
  • "Why the West rules-- for now : the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"@en
  • "Why the West rules-- for now : the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the West rules--for now : the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the West rules ... for now : the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the West rules - for now : the patterns of history and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the west rules -- for now the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"@en
  • "Why the West rules - for now : the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the West rules - for now : the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"@en
  • "Why the west rules... for now : the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the West rules, for now : the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the West rules-- for now the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the west rules - for now : the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the West rules for now : the patterns of history and what they reveal about the future"
  • "Why the West rules-- for now the patterns of history, and what they reveal about the future"@en