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The hare with amber eyes a family's century of art and loss

Traces the parallel stories of nineteenth-century art patron Charles Ephrussi and his unique collection of 360 miniature netsuke Japanese ivory carvings, documenting Ephrussi's relationship with Marcel Proust and the impact of the Holocaust on his cosmopolitan family.

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  • "Traces the parallel stories of nineteenth century art patron Charles Ephrussi and his unique collection of 360 miniature netsuke Japanese ivory carvings, documenting Ephrussis relationship with Marcel Proust and the impact of the Holocaust on his cosmopolitan family."
  • "Traces the parallel stories of nineteenth-century art patron Charles Ephrussi and his unique collection of 360 miniature netsuke Japanese ivory carvings, documenting Ephrussi's relationship with Marcel Proust and the impact of the Holocaust on his cosmopolitan family."
  • "Traces the parallel stories of nineteenth-century art patron Charles Ephrussi and his unique collection of 360 miniature netsuke Japanese ivory carvings, documenting Ephrussi's relationship with Marcel Proust and the impact of the Holocaust on his cosmopolitan family."@en
  • "De laatste eigenaar van een verzameling Japanse gordelknopen, nazaat van een steenrijke joodse familie, gaat na hoe het leven van eerdere eigenaren is verlopen."
  • "264 wood and ivory netsuke, none of them larger than a matchbox: in a stunningly original memoir Edmund de Waal describes the journey taken by this exquisite collection - and the family who treasured it."
  • "264 wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox: potter Edmund de Waal was entranced when he first encountered the collection in the Tokyo apartment of his great uncle Iggie."
  • ""Edmund de Waal is a world-famous ceramicist. Having spent thirty years making beautiful pots - which are then sold, collected, and handed on - he has a particular sense of the secret lives of objects. When he inherited a collection of 264 tiny Japanese wood and ivory carvings, called netsuke, he wanted to know who had touched and held them, and how the collection had managed to survive. And so begins this extraordinary moving memoir and detective story as de Waal discovers both the story of the netsuke and of his family, the Ephrussis, over five generations. A nineteenth-century banking dynasty in Paris and Vienna, the Ephrussis were as rich and respected as the Rothschilds. Yet by the end of World War II, when the netsuke were hidden from the Nazis in Vienna, this collection of very small carvings was all that remained of their vast empire." [Source : 4e de couv.]."
  • "Traces the parallel stories of nineteenth century art patron Charles Ephrussi and his unique collection of 360 miniature netsuke Japanese ivory carvings, documenting Ephrussi's relationship with Marcel Proust and the impact of the Holocaust on his cosmopolitan family."@en
  • "264 wood and ivory carvings none of them larger than a matchbox; Edmund de Waal was entranced by the collection when he first saw it in the Tokyo apartment of his great uncle. When he inherited them, he found that they unlocked a bigger story."@en
  • "Traces the parallel stories of nineteenth-century art patron Charles Ephrussi and his unique collection of 264 miniature netsuke Japanese ivory carvings, documenting Ephrussi's relationship with Marcel Proust and the impact of the Holocaust on his cosmopolitan family."@en
  • "Traces the parallel stories of nineteenth-century art patron Charles Ephrussi and his unique collection of 264 miniature netsuke Japanese ivory carvings, documenting Ephrussi's relationship with Marcel Proust and the impact of the Holocaust on his cosmopolitan family."
  • "The definitive illustrated edition of the international bestseller Two hundred and sixty-four Japanese wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox: Edmund de Waal was entranced when he first encountered the collection in his great-uncle Iggie's Tokyo apartment. When he later inherited the netsuke, they unlocked a far more dramatic story than he could ever have imagined. From a burgeoning empire in Odessa to fin de siEcle Paris, from occupied Vienna to postwar Tokyo, de Waal traces the netsuke's journey through generations of his remarkable family against the backdrop of a tumultuous century. With sumptuous photographs of the netsuke collection and full-color images from de Waal's family archive, the illustrated edition of The Hare with Amber Eyes transforms a deeply intimate saga into a work of visual art."@en
  • "The Ephrussis were a grand banking family, as rich and respected as the Rothschilds, who "burned like a comet" in nineteenth-century Paris and Vienna society. Yet by the end of World War II, almost the only thing remaining of their vast empire was a collection of 264 wood and ivory carvings, none of them larger than a matchbox. The renowned ceramicist Edmund de Waal became the fifth generation to inherit this small and exquisite collection of netsuke. Entranced by their beauty and mystery, he determined to trace the story of his family through the story of the collection. The netsuke'drunken monks, almost-ripe plums, snarling tigers'were gathered by Charles Ephrussi at the height of the Parisian rage for all things Japanese. Charles had shunned the place set aside for him in the family business to make a study of art, and of beautiful living. An early supporter of the Impressionists, he appears, oddly formal in a top hat, in Renoir's Luncheon of the Boating Party. Marcel Proust studied Charles closely enough to use him as a model for the aesthete and lover Swann in Remembrance of Things Past. Charles gave the carvings as a wedding gift to his cousin Viktor in Vienna; his children were allowed to play with one netsuke each while they watched their mother, the Baroness Emmy, dress for ball after ball. Her older daughter grew up to disdain fashionable society. Longing to write, she struck up a correspondence with Rilke, who encouraged her in her poetry. The Anschluss changed their world beyond recognition. Ephrussi and his cosmopolitan family were imprisoned or scattered, and Hitler's theorist on the "Jewish question" appropriated their magnificent palace on the Ringstrasse. A library of priceless books and a collection of Old Master paintings were confiscated by the Nazis. But the netsuke were smuggled away by a loyal maid, Anna, and hidden in her straw mattress. Years after the war, she would find a way to return them to the family she'd served even in their exile. In The Hare with Amber Eyes, Edmund de Waal unfolds the story of a remarkable family and a tumultuous century. Sweeping yet intimate, it is a highly original meditation on art, history, and family, as elegant and precise as the netsuke themselves."@en

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  • "Autobiographies"
  • "Biografieën"
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "History"@en
  • "History"
  • "Historical fiction"
  • "Biography"@en
  • "Biography"

http://schema.org/name

  • "The hare with amber eyes : a family's century of art and loss"
  • "The hare with amber eyes a family's century of art and loss"@en
  • "The hare with amber eyes"
  • "A hidden inheritance"@en
  • "The hare with amber eyes (illustrated edition) a hidden inheritance"@en
  • "The Hare With Amber Eyes : A Hidden Inheritance"
  • "The Hare With Amber Eyes A Hidden Inheritance"@en
  • "The hare with amber ayes : a hidden inheritance"
  • "a hidden inheritance"@en
  • "The Hare with Amber Eyes : a Hidden Inheritance"
  • "The hare with amber eyes : a hidden inheritance"
  • "The hare with amber eyes : a hidden inheritance"@en
  • "The hare with amber eyes a hidden inheritance"
  • "The hare with amber eyes a hidden inheritance"@en
  • "The Hare with Amber Eyes : a Family's Century of Art and Loss"

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