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The paradox of choice why more is less

Whether buying a pair of jeans or applying to college, everyday decisions, big and small, have become increasingly complex due to the abundance of choice with which we are presented. As Americans, we assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction--but choice overload can make you question your decisions before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for failures. This can lead to decision-making paralysis, anxiety, and stress. In this book, social scientist Schwartz explains at what point choice--the hallmark of individual freedom that we so cherish--becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being. He offers practical steps on how to limit choices to a manageable number, focus on those that are important and ignore the rest, and derive greater satisfaction from the choices you have to make.

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  • "Whether buying a pair of jeans or applying to college, everyday decisions, big and small, have become increasingly complex due to the abundance of choice with which we are presented. As Americans, we assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction--but choice overload can make you question your decisions before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for failures. This can lead to decision-making paralysis, anxiety, and stress. In this book, social scientist Schwartz explains at what point choice--the hallmark of individual freedom that we so cherish--becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being. He offers practical steps on how to limit choices to a manageable number, focus on those that are important and ignore the rest, and derive greater satisfaction from the choices you have to make."@en
  • "Whether buying a pair of jeans or applying to college, everyday decisions, big and small, have become increasingly complex due to the abundance of choice with which we are presented. As Americans, we assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction--but choice overload can make you question your decisions before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for failures. This can lead to decision-making paralysis, anxiety, and stress. In this book, social scientist Schwartz explains at what point choice--the hallmark of individual freedom that we so cherish--becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being. He offers practical steps on how to limit choices to a manageable number, focus on those that are important and ignore the rest, and derive greater satisfaction from the choices you have to make.--From publisher description."@en
  • "Whether buying a pair of jeans or applying to college, everyday decisions, big and small, have become increasingly complex due to the abundance of choice with which we are presented. As Americans, we assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction--but choice overload can make you question your decisions before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for failures. This can lead to decision-making paralysis, anxiety, and stress. In this book, social scientist Schwartz explains at what point choice--the hallmark of individual freedom that we so cherish--becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being. He offers practical steps on how to limit choices to a manageable number, focus on those that are important and ignore the rest, and derive greater satisfaction from the choices you have to make.--From publisher description."
  • "In the spirit of Alvin Toffler's Future Shock, a social critique of our obsession with choice, and how it contributes to anxiety, dissatisfaction and regret. This paperback includes a new P.S. section with author interviews, insights, features, suggested readings, and more. Whether we're buying a pair of jeans, ordering a cup of coffee, selecting a long-distance carrier, applying to college, choosing a doctor, or setting up a 401(k), everyday decisions--both big and small--have become increasingly complex due to the overwhelming abundance of choice with which we are presented.We assume that more choice means better options and greater satisfaction. But beware of excessive choice: choice overload can make you question the decisions you make before you even make them, it can set you up for unrealistically high expectations, and it can make you blame yourself for any and all failures. In the long run, this can lead to decision-making paralysis, anxiety, and perpetual stress. And, in a culture that tells us that there is no excuse for falling short of perfection when your options are limitless, too much choice can lead to clinical depression.In The Paradox of Choice, Barry Schwartz explains at what point choice--the hallmark of individual freedom and self-determination that we so cherish--becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being. In accessible, engaging, and anecdotal prose, Schwartz shows how the dramatic explosion in choice--from the mundane to the profound challenges of balancing career, family, and individual needs--has paradoxically become a problem instead of a solution. Schwartz also shows how our obsession with choice encourages us to seek that which makes us feel worse.By synthesizing current research in the social sciences, Schwartz makes the counterintuitive case that eliminating choices can greatly reduce the stress, anxiety, and busyness of our lives. He offers eleven practical steps on how to limit choices to a manageable number, have the discipline to focus on the important ones and ignore the rest, and ultimately derive greater satisfaction from the choices you have to make."@en

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  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Ratgeber"

http://schema.org/name

  • "De paradox van keuzes : hoe teveel een probleem kan zijn"
  • "Sŏnt'aek ŭi simnihak : sŏnt'aek hamyŏn pandŭsi huhoe hanŭn idŭl ŭi simni t'amgu = The paradox of choice"
  • "Anleitung zur Unzufriedenheit : warum weniger glücklicher macht"
  • "Anleitung zur Unzufriedenheit warum weniger glücklicher macht"
  • "The paradox of choice why more is less"@en
  • "Sŏnt'aek ŭi simnihak : sŏnt'aek hamyŏn pandŭsi huhwae hanŭn idŭl ŭi simni t'amgu"
  • "The Paradox of choice : why more is less"
  • "Valfrihetens tyranni : en bok om konsten att välja"@sv
  • "The paradox of choice : why more os less"
  • "선택 의 심리학 : 선택 하면 반드시 후회하는 이들 의 심리 탐구 = The paradox of choice"
  • "The paradox of choice : why more is less : [how the culture of abundance robs us of satisfaction]"
  • "The paradox of choice"
  • "The paradox of choice"@en
  • "Wu cong xuan ze : wei he duo ji shi shao"
  • "Sŏnt'aek ŭi p'aerŏdoksŭ : tasinŭn huhoe hago sipchi annŭn idŭl ŭl wihan sŏnt'aek ŭi kisul"
  • "The paradox of choice : why more is less"
  • "The paradox of choice : why more is less"@en
  • "Por qué más es menos : la tiranía de la abundancia"@es
  • "Por qué más es menos : la tiranía de la abundancia"
  • "Por que mas es menos : la tirania de la abundancia"@es
  • "선택의패러독스 : 다시는는후회하고십지않은이들위한선택의기술"
  • "Nghịch lý của sự lựa chọn : tại sao nhiều hơn lại ít hơn"
  • "Paradoks wyboru : dlaczego więcej oznacza mniej"@pl
  • "无从选择 : 为何多即是少"

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