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The Rainbow

Like many of D.H. Lawrence's novels, The Rainbow explores an attempt to live a fulfilled life within the strict social and economic confines of the British class system. It tells the story of three generations of the Brangwen family: Tom, Anna, and Ursula each rail against the limitations imposed on their lives, with each generation finding more freedom as industrialisation creeps across England. The character of Ursula, who is seen again in Lawrence's Women in Love, was particularly controversial. Her tumultuous love affairs, including one same sex liaison, resulted in the novel being banned upon publication. When it was made available eleven years later, it was a commercial success despite continued objections about its perceived obscenity.

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  • "Phoenix edition of D.H. Lawrence"
  • "Hong"@en
  • "Novels"

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http://schema.org/description

  • "Like many of D.H. Lawrence's novels, The Rainbow explores an attempt to live a fulfilled life within the strict social and economic confines of the British class system. It tells the story of three generations of the Brangwen family: Tom, Anna, and Ursula each rail against the limitations imposed on their lives, with each generation finding more freedom as industrialisation creeps across England. The character of Ursula, who is seen again in Lawrence's Women in Love, was particularly controversial. Her tumultuous love affairs, including one same sex liaison, resulted in the novel being banned upon publication. When it was made available eleven years later, it was a commercial success despite continued objections about its perceived obscenity."@en
  • ""Chronicles the lives of three generations of the Brangwen family, setting them against the emergence of modern England. This work examines the relationships and the conflicts they bring, and the inextricable mingling of the physical and the spiritual"--NoveList."
  • "Story of three generations of English middle-class people and their sexual conflicts. The Rainbow chronicles the lives of three generations of the Brangwen family of Nottinghamshire, and is a metaphysical inquiry into the possibilities that human relationships hold amid the uncompromisiing circumstance of industrial culture, which Lawrence continued in Women in Love. Throughout the novel the rainbow symbolises each character's search for self-fulfilment."@en
  • "The story of three generations of a Nottingham family whose love affairs move backward and forward across the years."
  • "The story of three generations of a Nottingham family whose love affairs move backward and forward across the years."@en
  • "Story of three generations of English middle-class people and their sexual conflicts."
  • "Ursula Brangwen confronts the restraints of her upbringing in order to experience life and love on her own terms."
  • "Chronicles the lives of three generations of the Brangrwen family of Nottinghamshire, and is a metaphysical inquiry into the possibilities that human relationships hold amid the uncompromising circumstances of industrial culture."@en
  • "The works of British author D.H. Lawrence were often considered to be shocking because of their frank treatment of subjects such as sexuality and desire, and novels such as Sons and Lovers, Women in Love and Lady Chatterley's Lover were often censored or confiscated due to their graphic content. The Rainbow, another of Lawrence's best-known novels, certainly doesn't shy away from its depiction of human intimacy in all of its forms."@en
  • "A novel depicting the sensual experiences of the blond, slow-speaking Brangmens who for generations have lived on Marsh Farm in Nottinghamshire."
  • "A novel depicting the sensual experiences of the blond, slow-speaking Brangwens who for generations have lived on Marsh Farm in Nottinghamshire."
  • "The Brangwen family has lived in Nottinghamshire for generations. The Rainbow tells the story of the three generations of Brangwens who live at Marsh Farm from 1840 to the early 1900 s. In this book, D. H. Lawrence explored the impact of sexuality upon human relationships with such frankness that, shortly after its publication in 1915, it was brought to trial for obscenity."@en
  • "The novel follows three generations of the Brangwen family living in Nottinghamshire, focusing on relations and sexual dynamics of the characters. The Rainbow represents Lawrence's frank treatment of sexual desire and the power it plays within relationships as a natural and even spiritual force of life, and explores the topic of female homosexuality."
  • "The Brangwen family lives and works in a small Midlands mining community. When rebellious daughter Ursula comes into womanhood, a Polish emigrant stirs her heart and she reaches out to both men and women in a quest for love, independence and fulfillment."@en
  • "When Tom Brangwen marries a Polish widow he discovers that love must come to terms with the other forces that make up a human personality."
  • "Lawrence traces a circuitous journey through three generations--alternating voices of three generations of Brangwen women--from the Polish widow to her Brangwen husband, her daughter to another Brangwen, and eventually the "heiress" of Brangwen memories, Ursula. A novel about a journey towards the understanding of love."
  • "The Rainbow is a 1915 novel by British author D.H. Lawrence. It follows three generations of the Brangwen family, particularly focusing on the sexual dynamics of, and relations between, the characters.-- Excerpted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia."@en
  • "The Rainbow chronicles the lives of three generations of the Brangwen family over a period of more than 60 years, setting them against the emergence of modern England. In her introduction to this edition Kate Flint illuminates Lawrence's aims and achievements against the background of the burgeoning century. - ;To be oneself was a supreme, gleaming triumph of infinity This is the insight that flashes upon Ursula as she struggles to assert her individuality and to stand separate from her family and her surroundings on the brink of womanhood and the modern world. In The Rainbow (1915) Lawrence c."@en
  • "Chronicles the lives of three generations of the Brangwen family, setting them against the emergence of modern England. This work examines the relationships and the conflicts they bring, and the inextricable mingling of the physical and the spiritual."@en

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  • "Powieść angielska"
  • "Classic fiction (pre c 1945)"@en
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Romans (teksten)"
  • "Classic fiction"@en
  • "Domestic fiction"@en
  • "Domestic fiction"

http://schema.org/name

  • "The rainbow : [a novel]"
  • "The Rainbow"@en
  • "The Rainbow"
  • "Rainbow [Lawrence]"
  • "Rainbow"@en
  • "Rainbow"
  • "The rainbow : With an introd. by Richard Aldington"
  • "The rainbow : Novel"
  • "The rainbow = Hong"@en
  • "The rainbow"@en
  • "The rainbow"
  • "The rainbow = 虹"

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