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Lady Chatterley's Lover ... Third printing

Introduction by Kathryn Harrison Inspired by the long-standing affair between D. H. Lawrence's German wife and an Italian peasant, Lady Chatterley's Lover follows the intense passions of Constance Chatterley. Trapped in an unhappy marriage to an aristocratic mine owner whose war wounds have left him paralyzed and impotent, Constance enters into a liaison with the gamekeeper Mellors. Frank Kermode called the book D. H. Lawrence's "great achievement," AnaIs Nin described it as "his best novel," and Archibald MacLeish hailed it as "one of the most important works of fiction of the century." Along with an incisive Introduction by Kathryn Harrison, this Modern Library edition includes the transcript of the judge's decision in the famous 1959 obscenity trial that allowed Lady Chatterley's Lover to be published in the United States. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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  • "A propos of "Lady Chatterley's lover""
  • "A propos of 'Lady Chatterley's lover'"
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover and a propos of "Lady Chatterley's lover""@en
  • "Propos of Lady Chatterly's lover"
  • "Apropos of Lady Chatterley's lover"@en
  • "Apropos of Lady Chatterley's lover"
  • "My skirmish with Jolly Roger"
  • "My skirmish with Jolly Roger"@en
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover"@en
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover"
  • "Sammlung"
  • "A propos of Lady Chatterley's lover"

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  • "Introduction by Kathryn Harrison Inspired by the long-standing affair between D. H. Lawrence's German wife and an Italian peasant, Lady Chatterley's Lover follows the intense passions of Constance Chatterley. Trapped in an unhappy marriage to an aristocratic mine owner whose war wounds have left him paralyzed and impotent, Constance enters into a liaison with the gamekeeper Mellors. Frank Kermode called the book D. H. Lawrence's "great achievement," AnaIs Nin described it as "his best novel," and Archibald MacLeish hailed it as "one of the most important works of fiction of the century." Along with an incisive Introduction by Kathryn Harrison, this Modern Library edition includes the transcript of the judge's decision in the famous 1959 obscenity trial that allowed Lady Chatterley's Lover to be published in the United States. From the Trade Paperback edition."@en
  • ""Lady Chatterley's Lover first published 1928 ; A Propos of 'Lady Chatterley's Lover' first published 1930 ; Cambridge University Press Edition published 1993 ; Published with new editorial material in Penguin Books 1994 ; This edition published with new Chronology, Introduction, Further reading and A Note on the Texts in Penguin Classics 2006 ; This edition published 2009" --Verso [p. iv]."
  • "Constance Chatterley is possessed of a certain vitality, yet she is deeply unhappy in her marriage to an invalid. She finds refuge in the arms of Mellors the game-keeper. Together they move from an outer world of chaos towards an inner world of fulfillment."@en
  • "Constance Chatterley is possessed of a certain vitality, yet she is deeply unhappy in her marriage to an invalid. She finds refuge in the arms of Mellors the game-keeper. Together they move from an outer world of chaos towards an inner world of fulfillment."
  • "In Lady Chatterley's Lover, Lawrence comes full circle to argue once again for individual regeneration, which can be found only through the relationship between man and woman (and, he asserts sometimes, man and man). Love and personal relationships are the threads that bind this novel together. Lawrence explores a wide range of different types of relationships. The reader sees the brutal, bullying relationship between Mellors and his wife Bertha, who punishes him by preventing his pleasure. There is Tommy Dukes, who has no relationship because he cannot find a woman whom he respects intellectu."@en
  • "D.H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover scandalized the world when it was first published in paperback, and helped put Penguin Books on trial."
  • "In Lady Chatterley's Lover, Lawrence argues for individual regeneration, which can be found only through the relationship between man and woman (and, he asserts sometimes, man and man). Love and personal relationships are the threads that bind this novel together. Lawrence explores a wide range of different types of relationships. The reader sees the brutal, bullying relationship between Mellors and his wife Bertha, who punishes him by preventing his pleasure. There is Tommy Dukes, who has no relationship because he cannot find a woman who he respects intellectually and at th."@en
  • "They had to love behind locked doors! The lord had lost his manhood during the war. His young wife was beginning to experience needs and urges her body could not deny. The gardener was a primal, earthy man who lived in the moment."
  • "Connie's unhappy marriage to Clifford Chatterley is one scarred by mutual frustration and alienation. Crippled from wartime action, Clifford is confined to a wheelchair, while Connie's solitary, sterile existence is contained within the narrow parameters of the Chatterley ancestral home, Wragby. She seizes her chance at happiness and freedom when she embarks on a passionate affair with the estate's gamekeeper, Mellors, discovering a world of sexual opportunity and pleasure she'd thought lost to her."@en
  • "Lady Chatterley's Lover, by D. H. Lawrence, is part of the <A href=http://www.barnesandnoble.com/classics/index.asp?z=y&cds2Pid=16447&sLinkPrefix>Barnes & Noble Classics</A> series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:<UL type=disc><LI style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto class=MsoNormal>New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars <LI style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto class=MsoNormal>Biographies of the authors <LI style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto class=MsoNormal>Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events <LI style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto class=MsoNormal>Footnotes and endnotes <LI style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto class=MsoNormal>Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work <LI style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto class=MsoNormal>Comments by other famous authors <LI style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto class=MsoNormal>Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations <LI style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto class=MsoNormal>Bibliographies for further reading <LI style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto class=MsoNormal>Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. <P style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt class=MsoNormal>The last, and most famous, of D. H. Lawrence's novels, Lady Chatterley's Lover was published in 1928 and banned in England and the United States as pornographic. While sexually tame by today's standards, the book is memorable for better reasons—Lawrence's masterful and lyrical prose, and a vibrant story that takes us bodily into the world of its characters. As the novel opens, Constance Chatterley finds herself trapped in an unfulfilling marriage to a rich aristocrat whose war wounds have left him paralyzed and impotent. After a brief but unsatisfying affair with a playwright, Lady Chatterley enjoys an extremely passionate relationship with the gamekeeper on the family estate, Oliver Mellors. As Lady Chatterley falls in love and conceives a child with Mellors, she moves from the heartless, bloodless world of the intelligentsia and aristocracy into a vital and profound connection rooted in sexual fulfillment. Through this novel, Lawrence attempted to revive in the human consciousness an awareness of savage sensuality, a sensuality with the power to free men and women from the enslaving sterility of modern technology and intellectualism. Perhaps even more relevant today than when it first appeared, Lady Chatterley's Lover is a triumph of passion and an erotic celebration of life. <P style=MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt>Susan Ostrov Weisser is a professor in the English Department at Adelphi University, where she specializes in nineteenth-century literature and women's studies, and teaches frequently in the Honors College."
  • "Lady Chatterley's Lover was inspired by the long-standing affair between Frieda, Lawrence's aristocratic German wife, and an Italian peasant who eventually became her third husband; Lawrence's struggle with sexual impotence; and the circumstances of his and Frieda's courtship and the early years of their marriage. Constance Chatterley, married to an aristocrat and mine owner whose war wounds have left him paralyzed and impotent, has an affair with Mellors, a gamekeeper, becomes pregnant, and considers abandoning her husband. One of the seminal class novels of the century, it was considered flagrantly pornographic when first published in 1928. The book also exists in two other, completely different versions: The First Lady Chatterley and John Thomas and Lady Jane. Lawrence considered Lady Chatterley's Lover to be definitive, and the one least likely to be prosecuted, and although its early banning proved him wrong, a famous obscenity trial some three decades after his death in 1930 finally cleared it for wider dissemination."@en
  • "When her paralyzed husband urges the repressed Lady Chatterley to find fulfillment and an heir for his fortune in the arms of another man, she embarks on a journey that changes her forever."
  • "A book which has achieved more notoriety for its sex scenes (shocking in 1930, when the book was written) than for its character studies, Lady Chatterley's Lover focuses on the affair between Constance, the "sturdy" young wife of Clifford Chatterley, and the gamekeeper of the Chatterleys' estate in the remote midlands. Constance, who married Clifford a month before he left for World War I, has become his caretaker since his return from the war, paralyzed from the waist down and impotent. A writer who surrounds himself with intellectual friends, Clifford regards Connie as his hostess and caregiver and does not understand her abject yearning for some life of her own. The distance between Constance and Clifford increases when Mrs. Bolton, a widow from the village, becomes his devoted caretaker, and he becomes increasingly dependent upon her."
  • "Constance Chatterley is trapped in a loveless marriage, and when she meets the new gamekeeper at her husband's estate, she finds herself experiencing true love for the first time."@en
  • "Constance Chatterley is trapped in a loveless marriage, and when she meets the new gamekeeper at her husband's estate, she finds herself experiencing true love for the first time."
  • "Prior to the Great War, Constance's life had been spent in the company of a group of well-bred Cambridge anarchists: by the end of the war, her husband had been returned to her, a broken man. Time passes monotonously, but she then meets Mellors, a man whose earthy, sensual qualities are in sharp contrast to everything she had ever encountered. Together they face a new world, in which the accepted boundaries of class and secuality were being challenged."
  • "A seductive and beautiful love story about an aristocrat, Sir Clifford Chatterley, who has come home from the war paralyzed from the waist down. His wife devotes herself to his care, but her husbands bitter arrogance soon makes her life a nightmare. Selfishly he suggests that she produce an heir. He never dreams that she will break all the rules and forgetting her social class, take their gamekeeper as her lover."
  • "A seductive and beautiful love story about an aristocrat, Sir Clifford Chatterley, who has come home from the war paralyzed from the waist down. His wife devotes herself to his care, but her husbands bitter arrogance soon makes her life a nightmare. Selfishly he suggests that she produce an heir. He never dreams that she will break all the rules and forgetting her social class, take their gamekeeper as her lover."@en
  • "Lady Chatterley's upper-class husband has been rendered paralyzed and impotent. She crosses class and gender boundaries when she takes her gamekeeper as a lover. The novel remained unpublished for thirty years in the UK because of its explicit discussion of sexuality."@en
  • "Bold, passionate, and erotic, this classic tale of love and discovery pits the paralyzed and callous Clifford Chatterley against his indecisive wife and her persuasive lover."
  • ""As the novel opens, Constance Chatterley finds herself trapped in an unfulfilling marriage to a rich aristocrat whose war wounds have left him paralyzed and impotent. After a brief but unsatisfying affair with a playwright, Lady Chatterley enjoys an extremely passionate relationship with Oliver Mellors, a gamekeeper on the family estate."--P. [4] of cover."
  • ""This ... text ... chronicles the affair between Constance Chatterley and the gamekeeper Mellors and includes the author's "A Propos of Lady Chatterley's Lover," his final thoughts on the male-female relationship in the modern world.""@en
  • "With her soft brown hair, lithe figure and big, wondering eyes, Constance Chatterley is possessed of a certain vitality. Yet she is deeply unhappy, married to a physical and emotional cripple, and embarks on an affair with Mellors, the gamekeeper."
  • "With her soft brown hair, lithe figure and big, wondering eyes, Constance Chatterley is possessed of a certain vitality. Yet she is deeply unhappy, married to a physical and emotional cripple, and embarks on an affair with Mellors, the gamekeeper."@en
  • "One of the major works of fiction written during the twentieth century, D. H. Lawrence's last novel is an erotic celebration of life. Described by the New York TimesLawrence's classic tale of love and discovery pits the paralyzed and callous Clifford Chatterley against two major characters: Constance, his wife--a lonely, indecisive woman trapped in a sterile marriage--and her persuasive lover, Oliver Mellors, the robust and blunt-spoken gamekeeper of her husband's estate. The lyrical tale of their passionate, adulterous love affair has transported generations of readers into a world filled with natural beauty and seething with human emotion. A masterfully written opus, this extraordinary love story is essential reading for any study of twentieth-century literature."@en
  • "This is a classic."@en
  • "Inspired by the long-standing affair between Frieda, Lawrence's German wife, and an Italian peasant who eventually became her third husband, Lady Chatterley's lover is the story of Constance Chatterley, who, while trapped in an unhappy marriage to an aristocratic mine owner whose war wounds have left him paralyzed and impotent, has an affair with Mellors, the gamekeeper. Frank Kermode calls the book Lawrence's "great achievement" and Anaïs Nin describes it as "artistically ... his best novel.""
  • "When first published privately in Italy, in 1928, Lady Chatterly's Lover was too risqué for readers and was considered unprintable. It wasn't until three decades later, in 1960, that the novel could be printed openly in the United Kingdom. Much debate has gone into what constitutes erotic literature; but whether the novel was about a scandalous affair or a quest for purity, or about the class system and social conflict, one needs to read it for oneself to find the message that lies within."@en
  • "The story of Constance Chatterley, the wife of an invalid, who finds love in the arms of the game-keeper."
  • "Banned in 1928, and when it was published here in 1960, this frank depiction of a young woman's sensual awakening was at the centre of a sensational obscenity trial in 1963. Constance Chatterley is deeply unhappy; married to an invalid, she is almost as inwardly paralysed as her husband. Oppressed by her dreary life, she finds refuge and regeneration in the arms of Mellors the game-keeper."
  • "A seductive and beautiful love story. Tells about an aristocrat, Sir Clifford Chatterley, who has come home from the war paralyzed from the waist down. His wife devotes herself to his care, but her husband's bitter arrogance soon makes her existence a nightmare. Selfishly he suggests that she produce an heir. He never dreams that she will break all the rules, and forgetting her social class, take their gamekeeper as her lover."
  • "An account of Constance Chatterley's love for Mellors, her husband's gamekeeper, and the sense of completeness that they find in each other."@en
  • "Een jonge vrouw, die vervreemd is van haar echtgenoot, voelt zich in haar eenzaamheid aangetrokken tot de jachtopziener, die haar wekt tot een intens sensueel en seksueel leven."
  • "Lady Chatterley is trapped in an unhappy marriage with a husband who is paralyzed physically and emotionally."@en
  • "The wife of a crippled and impotent mine owner has an affair with the gamekeeper to produce the heir her husband had been asking her for."
  • "The story of the affair between Frieda, Lawrence's aristocratic German wife, and an Italian peasant."@en
  • "Constance, the wife of a crippled English aristocrat, runs away with her gamekeeper. Includes Archibald MacLeish's letter to Barney Rosset and Judge Bryan's decision in the obscenity case."
  • "Inspired by the long-standing affair between Frieda and an Italian peasant who eventually became her third husband, "Lady Chatterley's Lover" is one of the seminal and definitive class novels of the century of courtship and controversy."
  • "This one of most beautiful and tender love stories of modern fiction."@en
  • "Young English aristocrat Constance Chatterley enters a clandestine affair with her groundsman Oliver, and her marriage and world are changed."@en
  • "A seductive and beautiful love story about an aristocrat, Sir Clifford Chatterley, who has come home from the war paralyzed from the waist down. His wife devotes herself to his care, but her husband's bitter arrogance soon makes her life a nightmare. Selfishly he suggests that she produce an heir. He never dreams that she will break all the rules, and forgetting her social class, take their gamekeeper as her lover."@en
  • "A young woman, unable to be intimate with her husband after his war injuries, seeks solace and physical passion in the arms of a gamekeeper."@en
  • "Constance Chatterley turns from a sterile marriage to a passionate relationship with a spiritually independent gamekeeper."@en
  • "A crippled aristocrat's wife has an affair with the gameskeeper."@en
  • ""This...text...chronicles the affair between Constance Chatterley and the gamekeeper Mellors and includes the author's "A Propos of Lady Chatterley's Lover," his final thoughts on the male-female relationship in the modern world.""
  • "Presents the unexpurgated text of the 1928 edition of "Lady Chatterley's Lover," in which Constance Chatterley, trapped in a loveless marriage, finds herself experiencing true love for the first time after meeting the new gamekeeper at her husband's estate."
  • "Constance Chatterley, married to an aristocrat and mine owner whose war wounds have left him paralyzed and impotent, has an affair with Mellors, a gamekeeper, becomes pregnant, and considers abandoning her husband."@en

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  • "Love stories"@en
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  • "Piracies (Publishing)"@en
  • "Romance"
  • "Piracies"@en
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  • "Erotic stories"
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  • "Embroidered bindings (Binding)"
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  • "Powieść angielska"
  • "Trials, litigation, etc"@en
  • "Erotic fiction"@en
  • "Erotic fiction"
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  • "Romans (teksten)"
  • "Fiction"
  • "Fiction"@en
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  • "Design bindings (Binding)"
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  • "Classic novel"@en
  • "Vertalingen (vorm)"
  • "Urdu fiction"

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  • "The first and second Lady Chatterley novels"@en
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover : including My skirmish with Jolly Roger, written especially and exclusively as an introduction to this popular edition"
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  • "John Thomas and Lady Jane : the second version of "Lady Chatterley's lover"
  • "John Thomas and Lady Jane : the second version of Lady Chatterley's lover"
  • "John Thomas and Lady Jane : the second version of Lady Chatterley's lover"@en
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover : including My skirmish with Jolly Roger written especially and exclusively as an introduction to this poular edition"
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover : a propos of Lady Chatterley's lover"
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover : prefaced by the author's Apropos of Lady Chatterley's lover"@en
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover : prefaced by the author's Apropos of Lady Chatterley's lover"
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover : including My skirmish with Jolly Roger ; written especially and exclusively as an introduction to this popular edition"
  • "Lady chatterley's lover"@en
  • "Lady chatterley's lover"
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover : complete and unabridged"
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover = 查泰莱夫人的情人"
  • "John Thomas and lady Jane : the second version of Lady Chatterley's lover"
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover : the complete and unexpurgated 1928 Orioli edition"
  • "John Thomas and Lady Jane : (the 2. version of "Lady Chatterley's lover")"
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  • "Lady Chatterley's lover. With an introd. by Richard Hoggart"@en
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover, by D. H. Lawrence [A letter from Frieda Lawrence]"
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  • "Lady Chatterley's lover ; : A propos of 'Lady Chatterley's lover D.H. Lawrence"
  • "Lady Chatterley's lover : including, My skirmish with Jolly Roger : written especially and exclusively as an introduction to this popular edition"@en
  • "Lady Chatterley's Lover A Propos of "Lady Chatterley's Lover""@en
  • "Lady Chatterly's lover"
  • "Lady Chatterly's lover"@en

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