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Government Secrecy

"Government secrecy (GS) is a significant social, political, and policy issue and often presents as a barrier to civic participation, public right-to-know, historical understanding, and institutional accountability. This volume examines GS in a variety of contexts, including comparative examination of government control of information, new definitions, categories, censorship, ethics, and secrecys relationship with freedom of information and transparency. It investigates GS in terms of its current theoretical descriptions as power over and concealment of information (Bok 1983), a tampering of communications (Friedrich 1972), the compulsory withholding of knowledge, reinforced by the prospects of sanctions for disclosure (Shils), or Georg Simmel's (1906) idea of secrecy creating the possibility of a second world. Following the introduction this book is divided into the following six sections: Government Secrecy: Theoretical Musings; Government Secrecy and the Media; Government Secrecy and Technology; Freedom of Information; Government Secrecy: Current Policy; and Ethics. Articles are sourced from around the world and include some from USA, Mexico, Africa, Israel and Britain."--EBL book details.

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  • ""Government secrecy (GS) is a significant social, political, and policy issue and often presents as a barrier to civic participation, public right-to-know, historical understanding, and institutional accountability. This volume examines GS in a variety of contexts, including comparative examination of government control of information, new definitions, categories, censorship, ethics, and secrecys relationship with freedom of information and transparency. It investigates GS in terms of its current theoretical descriptions as power over and concealment of information (Bok 1983), a tampering of communications (Friedrich 1972), the compulsory withholding of knowledge, reinforced by the prospects of sanctions for disclosure (Shils), or Georg Simmel's (1906) idea of secrecy creating the possibility of a second world. Following the introduction this book is divided into the following six sections: Government Secrecy: Theoretical Musings; Government Secrecy and the Media; Government Secrecy and Technology; Freedom of Information; Government Secrecy: Current Policy; and Ethics. Articles are sourced from around the world and include some from USA, Mexico, Africa, Israel and Britain."--EBL book details."@en
  • "While descriptions of government secrecy abound in the scholarly and popular literature, no universally accepted definitions of government secrecy exist, although the concept of secrecy is generally understood as the intentional concealment of information by individuals and groups (Simmel, 1906; Bok, 1989). Secrecy is related to the larger concept of information control, which Tefft (1992, p. 39) considers a "social-science label which describes the process whereby secrets, private information, and the like are shared with some, but not with others ... no society do individuals treat all others with complete candor." Moreover, secrecy itselfmight better be defined as the mandatory or voluntary, but calculated, concealment of information, activities, or relationships. From the community's perspective the secrets may involve activities, plans, or relationships that are legal, illegal, or ethically neutral. (Tefft, 1980, p. 320). - Extract."@en
  • "This volume examines government secrecy in a variety of contexts, including comparative examination of government control of information, new definitions, categories, censorship, ethics, and secrecy's relationship with freedom of information and transparency. It expands on the theoretical and policy literature of government secrecy, freedom of information and transparency."
  • "Government secrecy (GS) is a significant social, political, and policy issue and often presents as a barrier to civic participation, public right-to-know, historical understanding, and institutional accountability. This volume examines GS in a variety of contexts, including comparative examination of government control of information, new definitions, categories, censorship, ethics, and secrecy's relationship with freedom of information and transparency. It investigates GS in terms of its current theoretical descriptions as power over and concealment of information (Bok 1983), a "tampering of communications" (Friedrich 1972), the "compulsory withholding of knowledge, reinforced by the prospects of sanctions for disclosure" (Shils), or Georg Simmel's (1906) idea of secrecy creating the "possibility of a second world." Following the introduction this book is divided into the following six sections: Government Secrecy: Theoretical Musings; Government Secrecy and the Media; Government Secrecy and Technology; Freedom of Information; Government Secrecy: Current Policy; and Ethics. Articles are sourced from around the world and include some from USA, Mexico, Africa, Israel and Britain."@en
  • "Government secrecy (GS) is a significant social, political, and policy issue and often presents as a barrier to civic participation, public right-to-know, historical understanding, and institutional accountability. This volume examines GS in a variety of contexts, including comparative examination of government control of information, new definitions, categories, censorship, ethics, and secrecy's relationship with freedom of information and transparency. It investigates GS in terms of its current theoretical descriptions as power over and concealment of information (Bok 1983), a "tampering of communications" (Friedrich 1972), the "compulsory withholding of knowledge, reinforced by the prospects of sanctions for disclosure" (Shils), or Georg Simmel's (1906) idea of secrecy creating the "possibility of a second world." Following the introduction this book is divided into the following six sections: Government Secrecy: Theoretical Musings; Government Secrecy and the Media; Government Secrecy and Technology; Freedom of Information; Government Secrecy: Current Policy; and Ethics. Articles are sourced from around the world and include some from USA, Mexico, Africa, Israel and Britain."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Electronic resource"@en
  • "Livres électroniques"
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Government Secrecy"@en
  • "Government Secrecy"
  • "Government Secrecy : Classic and Contemporary Readings"
  • "Government secrecy : classic and contemporary readings"
  • "Government secrecy : classic and contemporary readings"@en
  • "Government secrecy"@en
  • "Government secrecy"