WorldCat Linked Data Explorer

http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/917855394

The better angels of our nature why violence has declined

Today we may be living in the most peaceful time in human existence. The ceaseless news about war, crime, and terrorism makes it seem as if the world is getting bloodier. But in this book the author shows that violence has in fact declined over long stretches of history. How has this happened? Here the author examines the inner demons that incline us toward violence and the better angels that pull us away, and shows how changes in ideas and practices have allowed our better angels to prevail. In the process he explodes many myths about violence and presents a new defense of modernity and enlightenment. This exploration of human nature blends psychology and history to provide a picture of humanity's gradual conquest of violence.

Open All Close All

http://schema.org/about

http://schema.org/alternateName

  • "Why violence has declined"
  • "Why violence has declined"@en

http://schema.org/description

  • "Today we may be living in the most peaceful time in human existence. The ceaseless news about war, crime, and terrorism makes it seem as if the world is getting bloodier. But in this book the author shows that violence has in fact declined over long stretches of history. How has this happened? Here the author examines the inner demons that incline us toward violence and the better angels that pull us away, and shows how changes in ideas and practices have allowed our better angels to prevail. In the process he explodes many myths about violence and presents a new defense of modernity and enlightenment. This exploration of human nature blends psychology and history to provide a picture of humanity's gradual conquest of violence."@en
  • "We've all asked, "What is the world coming to?" But we seldom ask, "How bad was the world in the past?" In this startling new book, cognitive scientist Steven Pinker shows that the past was much worse. Evidence of a bloody history has always been around us: genocides in the Old Testament, gory mutilations in Shakespeare and Grimm, monarchs who beheaded their relatives, and American founders who dueled with their rivals. The murder rate in medieval Europe was more than thirty times what it is today. Slavery, sadistic punishments, and frivolous executions were common features of life for millennia, then were suddenly abolished. How could this have happened, if human nature has not changed? Pinker argues that thanks to the spread of government, literacy, trade, and cosmopolitanism, we increasingly control our impulses, empathize with others, debunk toxic ideologies, and deploy our powers of reason to reduce the temptations of violence.--From publisher description."
  • "This volume argues that violence in the world has declined both in the long run and in the short, and suggests explanations why this has happened. The author maintains that the key to explaining the decline of violence is to understand the "inner demons" that incline us toward violence and the "better angels" that steer us away. Thanks to the spread of government, literacy, trade, and cosmopolitanism, we increasingly control our impulses, empathize with others, debunk toxic ideologies, and deploy our powers of reason to reduce the temptations of violence. The book is divided into 2 parts. The first part is an effort to describe a broad sweep of human history from prehistoric societies to the present, arguing for a progressive though intermittent decline in violence in human societies. The second part is an effort to understand the underpinnings of the decline in violence in terms of human psychological processes."
  • "Overview: Faced with the ceaseless stream of news about war, crime, and terrorism, one could easily think we live in the most violent age ever seen. Yet as New York Times bestselling author Steven Pinker shows in this startling and engaging new work, just the opposite is true: violence has been diminishing for millennia and we may be living in the most peaceful time in our species' existence. For most of history, war, slavery, infanticide, child abuse, assassinations, pogroms, gruesome punishments, deadly quarrels, and genocide were ordinary features of life. But today, Pinker shows (with the help of more than a hundred graphs and maps) all these forms of violence have dwindled and are widely condemned. How has this happened? This groundbreaking book continues Pinker's exploration of the essence of human nature, mixing psychology and history to provide a remarkable picture of an increasingly nonviolent world. The key, he explains, is to understand our intrinsic motives- the inner demons that incline us toward violence and the better angels that steer us away-and how changing circumstances have allowed our better angels to prevail. Exploding fatalist myths about humankind's inherent violence and the curse of modernity, this ambitious and provocative book is sure to be hotly debated in living rooms and the Pentagon alike, and will challenge and change the way we think about our society."
  • "Overzicht van de wereldgeschiedenis, waaruit blijkt dat de mensheid naar verhouding steeds minder gewelddadig is geworden."
  • "Overview: Faced with the ceaseless stream of news about war, crime, and terrorism, one could easily think we live in the most violent age ever seen. Yet as New York Times bestselling author Steven Pinker shows in this startling and engaging new work, just the opposite is true: violence has been diminishing for millennia and we may be living in the most peaceful time in our species' existence. For most of history, war, slavery, infanticide, child abuse, assassinations, pogroms, gruesome punishments, deadly quarrels, and genocide were ordinary features of life. But today, Pinker shows (with the help of more than a hundred graphs and maps) all these forms of violence have dwindled and are widely condemned. How has this happened? This groundbreaking book continues Pinker's exploration of the essence of human nature, mixing psychology and history to provide a remarkable picture of an increasingly nonviolent world. The key, he explains, is to understand our intrinsic motives--the inner demons that incline us toward violence and the better angels that steer us away--and how changing circumstances have allowed our better angels to prevail. Exploding fatalist myths about humankind's inherent violence and the curse of modernity, this ambitious and provocative book is sure to be hotly debated in living rooms and the Pentagon alike, and will challenge and change the way we think about our society."@en
  • "We've all asked, "What is the world coming to?" But we seldom ask, "How bad was the world in the past?" Cognitive scientist Steven Pinker shows that the past was much worse. Evidence of a bloody history has always been around us: genocides in the Old Testament, gory mutilations in Shakespeare and Grimm, monarchs who beheaded their relatives, and American founders who dueled with their rivals. The murder rate in medieval Europe was more than thirty times what it is today. Slavery, sadistic punishments, and frivolous executions were common features of life for millennia, then were suddenly abolished. How could this have happened, if human nature has not changed? Pinker argues that thanks to the spread of government, literacy, trade, and cosmopolitanism, we increasingly control our impulses, empathize with others, debunk toxic ideologies, and deploy our powers of reason to reduce the temptations of violence"
  • "A provocative history of violence?from the New York Times bestselling author of The Stuff of Thought and The Blank SlateBelieve it or not, today we may be living in the most peaceful moment in our species' existence. In his gripping and controversial new work, New York Times bestselling author Steven Pinker shows that despite the ceaseless news about war, crime, and terrorism, violence has actually been in decline over long stretches of history. Exploding myths about humankind's inherent violence and the curse of modernity, this ambitious book continues Pinker's exploration of the essence of human nature, mixing psychology and history to provide a remarkable picture of an increasingly enlightened world."@en
  • "We've all asked, "What is the world coming to?" But we seldom ask, "How bad was the world in the past?" In this book, the author, a cognitive scientist shows that the past was much worse; and that we may be living in the most peaceable era in our species' existence. Evidence of a bloody history has always been around us: genocides in the Old Testament, gory mutilations in Shakespeare and Grimm, monarchs who beheaded their relatives, and American founders who dueled with their rivals; the nonchalant treatment in popular culture of wife-beating, child abuse, and the extermination of native peoples. The murder rate in medieval Europe was more than thirty times what it is today. Slavery, sadistic punishments, and frivolous executions were common features of life for millennia, then were suddenly abolished. How could this have happened, if human nature has not changed? The author argues that thanks to the spread of government, literacy, trade, and cosmopolitanism, we increasingly control our impulses, empathize with others, bargain rather than plunder, debunk toxic ideologies, and deploy our powers of reason to reduce the temptations of violence.-- From publisher description."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Geschiedenis (vorm)"
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Ons betere ik : waarom de mens steeds minder geweld gebruikt"
  • "The better angels of our nature why violence has declined"
  • "The better angels of our nature why violence has declined"@en
  • "The better angels of our nature : Why violence has declined"
  • "The Better Angels of Our Nature Why Violence Has Declined"@en
  • "The better angels of our nature : why violence has declined"@en
  • "The better angels of our nature : why violence has declined"
  • "Gewalt : Eine neue Geschichte der Menschheit"
  • "Gewalt eine neue Geschichte der Menschheit"
  • "Gewalt : eine neue Geschichte der Menschheit"
  • "Gewalt Eine neue Geschichte der Menschheit"