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Buddenbrooks the decline of a family

Buddenbrooks was written before the turn of the century; it was first published in 1902, and became a German classic. It is one of those novels - we possess many of them in English - which are at once a work of art and the unique record of a period and a district. Buddenbrooks is great in its psychology, great as the monument of a vanished cultural tradition, and ultimately great by the perfection of its art: the classic purity and beautiful austerity of its style. The translation of a book which is a triumph of style in its own language, is always a piece of effrontery. Buddenbrooks is so leisurely, so chiselled: the great gulf of the war divides its literary method from that of our time. Besides the author has recorded much dialect. This is insuperable. Dialect cannot be transferred. So the present translation is offered with humility. It was necessary to recognize that the difficulties were great. Yet it was necessary to set oneself the bold task of transferring the spirit first and the letter so far as might be; and above all, to make certain that the work of art, coming as it does to the ear, in German, like music out of the past, should, in English, at least not come like a translation - which is, "God bless us, a thing of naught."--H.T. Lowe-Porter (translator's note).

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http://schema.org/alternateName

  • "Buddenbrooks. English"
  • "Buddenbrooks"

http://schema.org/description

  • "This was Thomas Mann's first novel and with it he established his fame as one of the great novelists of his generation. It tells of the gradual decline from the mid-nineteenth century prosperity and affluence of a merchant family to its final disintegration, weakened by an interest in the arts. This contrast between the strength of the bourgeois values and the weakness of the artistic ones remained a constant preoccupation of the author."
  • "Buddenbrooks was written before the turn of the century; it was first published in 1902, and became a German classic. It is one of those novels - we possess many of them in English - which are at once a work of art and the unique record of a period and a district. Buddenbrooks is great in its psychology, great as the monument of a vanished cultural tradition, and ultimately great by the perfection of its art: the classic purity and beautiful austerity of its style. The translation of a book which is a triumph of style in its own language, is always a piece of effrontery. Buddenbrooks is so leisurely, so chiselled: the great gulf of the war divides its literary method from that of our time. Besides the author has recorded much dialect. This is insuperable. Dialect cannot be transferred. So the present translation is offered with humility. It was necessary to recognize that the difficulties were great. Yet it was necessary to set oneself the bold task of transferring the spirit first and the letter so far as might be; and above all, to make certain that the work of art, coming as it does to the ear, in German, like music out of the past, should, in English, at least not come like a translation - which is, "God bless us, a thing of naught."--H.T. Lowe-Porter (translator's note)."@en
  • "A Major Literary Event: a brilliant new translation of Thomas Mann's first great novel, one of the two for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1929. Buddenbrooks, first published in Germany in 1900, when Mann was only twenty-five, has become a classic of modem literature -- the story of four generations of a wealthy bourgeois family in northern Germany. With consummate skill, Mann draws a rounded picture of middle-class life: births and christenings; marriages, divorces, and deaths; successes and failures. These commonplace occurrences, intrinsically the same, vary slightly as they recur in each succeeding generation. Yet as the Buddenbrooks family eventually succumbs to the seductions of modernity -- seductions that are at variance with its own traditions -- its downfall becomes certain. In immensity of scope, richness of detail, and fullness of humanity, Buddenbrooks surpasses all other modem family chronicles; it has, indeed, proved a model for most of them. Judged as the greatest of Mann's novels by some critics, it is ranked as among the greatest by all. Thomas Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1929. From the Hardcover edition."@en
  • "Buddenbrooks, first published in Germany in 1900, when Mann was only twenty-five, has become a classic of modem literature - the story of four generations of a wealthy bourgeois family in northern Germany. With consummate skill, Mann draws a rounded picture of middle-class life: births and christenings; marriages, divorces, and deaths; successes and failures. These commonplace occurrences, intrinsically the same, vary slightly as they recur in each succeeding generation. Yet as the Buddenbrooks family eventually succumbs to the seductions of modernity - seductions that are at variance with its own traditions - its downfall becomes certain. In immensity of scope, richness of detail, and fullness of humanity, Buddenbrooks surpasses all other modem family chronicles; it has, indeed, proved a model for most of them. Judged as the greatest of Mann's novels by some critics, it is ranked as among the greatest by all. Thomas Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1929."
  • "A major literary event: a brilliant new translation of Thomas Mann's first great novel, one of the two for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1929. Buddenbrooks, first published in Germany in 1900, when Mann was only twenty-five, has become a classic of modern literature - the story of four generations of a wealthy bourgeois family in northern Germany. With consummate skill, Mann draws a rounded picture of middle-class life: births and christenings; marriages, divorces, and deaths; successes and failures. These commonplace occurrences, intrinsically the same, vary slightly as they recur in each succeeding generation. Yet as the Buddenbrooks family eventually succumbs to the seductions of modernity - seductions that are at variance with its own traditions - its downfall becomes certain."
  • "The story of four generations of a wealthy bourgeois family in northern Germany captures the triumphs and tragedies, successes and failures, relationships, loves, and ordinary events of everyday middle-class life."

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Belletristische Darstellung"@en
  • "Classic fiction"
  • "Uncorrected proofs (Printing)"
  • "Electronic books"
  • "Electronic books"@en
  • "Translations"
  • "Domestic fiction"
  • "Powieść niemiecka"

http://schema.org/name

  • "Buddenbrooks : the Decline of a Family. Thomas Mann. Translated by H.T. Lowe-Porter"
  • "Buddenbrooks the decline of a family"
  • "Buddenbrooks the decline of a family"@en
  • "Buddenbrooks : the Decline of a Family"
  • "Buddenbrooks : the decline of a family"@en
  • "Buddenbrooks : the decline of a family"
  • "Buddenbrooks <engl.&gt"
  • "Buddenbrooks The decline of a family ; [In 1 Bd.]"
  • "Buddenbrooks: the decline of a family. Translated ... by H.T. Lowe-Porter"@en
  • "Buddenbrooks / Thomas Mann"@en
  • "Buddenbrooks"
  • "Buddenbrooks : the decline of a family: a novel"@en
  • "Buddenbrooks: the decline of a family"
  • "Buddenbrooks : the decline of a family : roman"
  • "Buddenbrooks : the decline of the family"
  • "Buddenbrooks : The Decline Of A Family"
  • "Buddenbrooks; the decline of a family"@en
  • "Buddenbrooks; the decline of a family"
  • "Buddenbrooks : the decline of a family : translated by H.T. Lowe-Porter"@en

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