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http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/503338257

The Aspern papers

A BBC Radio 4 "Book at Bedtime" recording of Samuel West reading from the novella The Aspern Papers by Henry James, set against the decaying grandeur of Venice. Originally broadcast 26 April-4 May, 2010. Henry James took as inspiration for his tale the story of a mistress of Byron's who outlived the poet into lonely old age. He transposed the setting to Venice and cast the city he loved as a character in a taut narrative of literary theft and deception ...

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http://schema.org/description

  • ""Set in a crumbling Venetian villa, The Aspern Papers is a novella about the heart's romantic ambitions and the pragmatic methods we use to pursue them. An American editor arrives in Venice on a quest to acquire some unpublished letters written by his favorite Romantic poet, Jeffrey Aspern. He tracks down the mistress to whom the letters were addressed, a now elderly Miss Bordereau, and presents himself as a prospective lodger. In hopes of gaining access to the secret papers, he begins courting Miss Bordereau's plain spinster niece, Miss Tina. As his obsessive mission leads him into increasingly unscrupulous behavior, he finds that his desire can be obtained only at the price of his honor"--Container."
  • "The narrator schemes to obtain love letters sent long ago to an elderly reclusive lady in Venice, by a famous writer."
  • "A BBC Radio 4 "Book at Bedtime" recording of Samuel West reading from the novella The Aspern Papers by Henry James, set against the decaying grandeur of Venice. Originally broadcast 26 April-4 May, 2010. Henry James took as inspiration for his tale the story of a mistress of Byron's who outlived the poet into lonely old age. He transposed the setting to Venice and cast the city he loved as a character in a taut narrative of literary theft and deception ..."@en
  • "Assuming a false name, an American editor and critic travels to Venice, and insinuates himself as a lodger into the palace belonging to Juliana Bordereau. He believes that Juliana possesses papers and poems written to her by the long-dead poet Jeffrey Aspern, and while these papers have a monetary value, they also represent a great deal more to the narrator. Juliana is now an elderly lady who lives in "obscurity" with her spinster niece, Tita. Officially, to those who have sought unpublished Aspern material in the past, Juliana and Tita state that no such papers exist. The narrator takes rooms in the palace with no clear plan in mind--except to ascertain that the papers really exist, and to acquire them ... somehow."@en
  • "Julianna and her niece are marking time in a villa in Venice. A literary editor obsessed with the work of a long-dead poet, Jeffrey Aspern, comes into their lives to try to ferret out his papers."@en
  • "An American editor rents a room in Venice in the home of Juliana Bordereau, the elderly mistress of Jeffrey Aspern, a deceased Romantic poet, in order to procure from her the poet's papers."@en
  • "Set in a crumbling Venetian villa, The Aspern Papers is a novella about the heart's romantic ambitions and the pragmatic methods we use to pursue them. An American editor arrives in Venice on a quest to acquire some unpublished letters written by his favorite Romantic poet, Jeffrey Aspern. He tracks down the mistress to whom the letters were addressed, a now elderly Miss Bordereau, and presents himself as a prospective lodger. In hopes of gaining access to the secret papers, he begins courting Miss Bordereau's plain spinster niece, Miss Tina. As his obsessive mission leads him into increasingly unscrupulous behavior, he finds that his desire can be obtained only at the price of his honor."@en
  • "In "The Aspern Papers," the unnamed narrator is an American editor and critic who travels to Venice. Assuming a false name, he insinuates himself as a lodger into the palace belonging to Juliana Bordereau. He believes that Juliana possesses papers and poems written to her by the long-dead poet Jeffrey Aspern, and while these papers have a monetary value, they also represent a great deal more to the narrator. Juliana is now an elderly lady who lives in "obscurity" with her spinster niece, Tita. Officially, to those who have sought unpublished Aspern material in the past, Juliana and Tita state that no such papers exist. The narrator takes rooms in the palace with no clear plan in mind--except to ascertain that the papers really exist, and to acquire them ... somehow."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Psychological fiction."@en
  • "Downloadable audio books."@en
  • "Downloadable audio books."
  • "Fiction."
  • "Fiction."@en
  • "Fiction"
  • "Fiction"@en
  • "Audiobooks."@en
  • "Audiobooks."
  • "Psychological fiction"@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "The Aspern papers"@en
  • "The Aspern papers"
  • "The Aspern papers [electronic resource]"@en
  • "Aspern Papers"
  • "The aspern papers"