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American experience. The murder of Emmett Till

The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began.

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  • "The murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a catalyst for the civil rights movement."
  • "Documents the 1955 brutal murder of Emmett Till, a teenager from Chicago who broke the unwritten Jim Crow South laws by whistling at a white woman in a grocery store in Money, Mississippi. His two white killers were acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury. They later sold their story to a journalist, from the magazine, Look. They gave details of how they killed the boy and disposed of his body. The Emmett Till trial and the result of the trial set off an international fire-storm and, nationally, spurred the civil rights movement. Includes selected archival footage and comments from Emmett Till's mother and other civil rights personalities interviewed."
  • "The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began."@en
  • "The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began."
  • "The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black youth who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Till's killers were apprehended, but quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury, later providing grisly details of the murder in a story to journalists. Three months after Till's body was found, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began."@en
  • ""In August, 1955, a fourteen-year-old black boy whistled at a white woman in a grocery store in Money, Mississippi. Emmett Till, a teen from Chicago, didn't understand that he had broken the unwritten laws of the Jim Crow South until three days later, when two white men dragged him from his bed in the dead of night, beat him brutally and then shot him in the head. Although his killers were arrested and charged with murder, they were both acquitted quickly by an all-white, all-male jury. Shortly afterwards, the defendants sold their story, including a detailed account of how they murdered Till, to a journalist. The murder and the trial horrified the nation and the world. Till's death was a spark that helped mobilize the civil rights movement. Three months after his body was pulled from the Tallahatchie River, the Montgomery bus boycott began."--Container."
  • "The murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began."@en
  • "The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi Grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, The Montgomery Bus Boycott began."
  • ""The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. After Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and sold their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began." Part of the American Experience programs."@en
  • "Deals with the brutal murder in Mississippi in 1955 of 14-year-old black boy Emmett Till for paying unwelcome attention to a white woman, his white killers acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury. Well-publicised case helped mobilise the American civil rights movement. Features archival material and eye-witness interviews."
  • ""Emmett Till's death was a spark that helped mobilise the civil rights movement. In August 1955, a 14 year old black boy from Chicago whistled at a white woman in a grocery store in Money, Mississippi. Emmett Till didn't understand that he had broken an unwritten law of the Jim Crow South. Three days later, two white men dragged him from his bed in the dead of night, beat him brutally, shot him, and dumped his body in the Tallahatchie River. Although his killers were arrested and charged with murder, they were both acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury." -- case-slip."
  • "Rated: PG Narrated by Andre Braugher Summary: In August 1955, a 14 year old black boy from Chicago whistled at a white woman in a grocery store in Money, Mississippi Emmett Till didn't understand that he had broken an unwritten law of the Jim Crow South Three days later, two white men dragged him from his bed in the dead of night, beat him brutally, shot him, and dumped his body in the Tallahatchie River Although his killers were arrested and charged with murder, they were both acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury Shortly after the trial, the defendants sold their story to the press They sold a detailed account of how they murdered Emmett Till to a journalist The story revealed how little remorse the men felt The federal government's failure to intercede in the Till case led blacks and whites to realise that if change were to come, they would have to do it themselves The Murder Of Emmett Till was a watershed in the development of the nascent movement for civil rights Three months and three days after Emmett Till's body was pulled from the Tallahatchie, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began (From ABC program guide) VHS."
  • ""Emmett Till's death was a spark that helped mobilise the civil rights movement. In August 1955, a 14 year old black boy from Chicago whistled at a white woman in a grocery store in Money, Mississippi. Emmett Till didn't understand that he had broken an unwritten law of the Jim Crow South. Three days later, two white men dragged him from his bed in the dead of night, beat him brutally, shot him, and dumped his body in the Tallahatchie River. Although his killers were arrested and charged with murder, they were both acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury."--Case-slip."@en
  • "In August 1955, a fourteen-year-old black boy whislted at a white woman in a grocery store in Money, Mississippi. Emmett Till, a teen from Chicago, didn't understand that he had broken the unwritten laws of the Jim Crow South until three days later when two white men dragged him from his bed in the dead of night, beat him brutally and then shot him in the head. Although his killers were arrested and charged with murder, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury. Shortly afterwards, the defendants sold their story, including a detailed account of how they murdered Till to a journalist. The murder and the trial horrified the nation and the world. Till's death was a spark that helped mobilize the civil rights movement. Three months after his body was pulled from the Tallahatchie River, the Montgomery bus boycott began."
  • "The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. The killers were acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury."@en
  • "In 1955, in Mississippi, a fourteen year old black boy was forced from his bed, beaten, shot and thrown in the Tallahatchie River, because he had whistled at a white woman. His killers were acquitted. His mother ordered that the casket be left open at his funeral to show his horrific injuries. The shock that the nation felt was considered a turning point for the emerging civil rights movement."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Biography"
  • "Biography"@en
  • "Documentary"@en
  • "History"@en
  • "History"
  • "Documentary films."@en
  • "Video recordings"
  • "Documentary television programs."@en
  • "Historical television programs."@en
  • "Video recordings for the hearing impaired."@en
  • "Historical"@en
  • "Television programs."@en
  • "Films for the hearing impaired."@en
  • "Historical films."@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "American experience. The murder of Emmett Till"@en
  • "The murder of Emmett Till."
  • "Murder of Emmett Till"@en
  • "The Murder of Emmett Till /"
  • "American experience."
  • "The murder of Emmett Till /"
  • "American experience (Television program). Murder of Emmett Till."@en
  • "The murder of Emmett Till"@en
  • "The murder of Emmett Till"