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The journals of Lewis and Clark /

expedition from the Missouri River to the northern Pacific coast and back. From 1804 to 1806, Lewis, accompanied by co-captain William Clark, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea, and thirty-two men, made the first trek across the Louisiana Purchase, mapping the rivers as he went, tracing the principal waterways to the sea, and establishing the American claim to the territories of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Together the captains kept a journal, a richly detailed record of.

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  • "expedition from the Missouri River to the northern Pacific coast and back. From 1804 to 1806, Lewis, accompanied by co-captain William Clark, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea, and thirty-two men, made the first trek across the Louisiana Purchase, mapping the rivers as he went, tracing the principal waterways to the sea, and establishing the American claim to the territories of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Together the captains kept a journal, a richly detailed record of."
  • "expedition from the Missouri River to the northern Pacific coast and back. From 1804 to 1806, Lewis, accompanied by co-captain William Clark, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea, and thirty-two men, made the first trek across the Louisiana Purchase, mapping the rivers as he went, tracing the principal waterways to the sea, and establishing the American claim to the territories of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Together the captains kept a journal, a richly detailed record of."@en
  • "the flora and fauna they sighted, the Indian tribes they encountered, and the awe-inspiring landscape they traversed, from their base camp near present-day St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River. In keeping this record they made an incomparable contribution to the literature of exploration and the writing of natural history."@en
  • "the flora and fauna they sighted, the Indian tribes they encountered, and the awe-inspiring landscape they traversed, from their base camp near present-day St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River. In keeping this record they made an incomparable contribution to the literature of exploration and the writing of natural history."
  • "At the dawn of the 19th century, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark embarked on an unprecedented journey from St. Louis, Missouri to the Pacific Ocean and back again. Their assignment was to explore the newly acquired Louisiana Territory and record the geography, flora, fauna, and people they encountered along the way. The tale of their incredible journey, meticulously recorded in their journals, has become an American classic. This single-volume, landmark edition of the famous journals is the first abridgement to be published in at least a decade."@en
  • "Primiary source."
  • "Primiary source."@en
  • ""At the dawn of the 19th century, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark embarked on an unprecedented journey from St. Louis, Missouri to the Pacific Ocean and back again. Their assignment was to explore the newly acquired Louisiana Territory and record the geography, flora, fauna, and people they encountered along the way. The tale of their incredible journey, meticulously recorded in their journals, has become an American classic"--Publisher description."
  • "Contains the travel journals of Meriwether Lewis and George Rogers Clark as they explored the area of the Louisiana Purchase with the group of twenty-eight called the Corps of Discovery."
  • "In the spring of 1805, Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, with a small band of men and a Shoshone woman, set out on a journey. Written by the explorers themselves, these journals remain the most vivid depiction of their epic trek."
  • "In 1803, when the United States purchased Louisiana from France, the great expanse of this new American territory was a blank-not only on the map but in our knowledge. President Thomas Jefferson keenly understood that the course of the nation's destiny lay westward and that a national "Voyage of Discovery" must be mounted to determine the nature and accessibility of the frontier. He commissioned his young secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to lead an intelligence-gathering expedition from the Missouri River to the northern Pacific coast and back. From 1804 to 1806, Lewis, accompanied by co-captain William Clark, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea, and thirty-two men, made the first trek across the Louisiana Purchase, mapping the rivers as he went, tracing the principal waterways to the sea, and establishing the American claim to the territories of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Together the captains kept a journal, a richly detailed record of the flora and fauna they sighted, the Indian tribes they encountered, and the awe-inspiring landscape they traversed, from their base camp near present-day St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River. In keeping this record they made an incomparable contribution to the literature of exploration and the writing of natural history. With 2003 marking the beginning of the Lewis and Clark expedition bicentennial celebration, this journal is now reissued in a beautiful new Penguin Classics package."
  • "In 1803, when the United States purchased Louisiana from France, the great expanse of this new American territory was a blank - not only on the map but in our knowledge. President Thomas Jefferson keenly understood that the course of the nation's destiny lay westward and that a national "Voyage of Discovery" must be mounted to determine the nature and accessibility of the frontier. He commissioned his young secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to lead an intelligence-gathering."
  • "In 1803, when the United States purchased Louisiana from France, the great expanse of this new American territory was a blank - not only on the map but in our knowledge. President Thomas Jefferson keenly understood that the course of the nation's destiny lay westward and that a national "Voyage of Discovery" must be mounted to determine the nature and accessibility of the frontier. He commissioned his young secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to lead an intelligence-gathering."@en
  • "This copy is part of a hypertexts collection produced by students and faculty at the University of Virginia American Studies Program."@en

http://schema.org/genre

  • "Genealogy"@en
  • "History."
  • "History."@en
  • "Genealogy."@en
  • "History"@en
  • "Reisbeschrijvingen (vorm)"
  • "Diaries"
  • "Diaries"@en
  • "Electronic books."
  • "Electronic books."@en

http://schema.org/name

  • "Journals"
  • "The journals of Lewis and Clark /"@en
  • "The journals of Lewis and Clark /"
  • "The Journals of Lewis and Clark."@en
  • "The Journals of Lewis and clark /"@en
  • "The Journals of Lewis and Clark"@en
  • "The Journals of Lewis and Clark"
  • "Journals of lewis and clark"@en
  • "The journals of Lewis and Clark"
  • "The journals of Lewis and Clark"@en
  • "The journals of Lewis and Clark."
  • "The journale of Lewis and Clark /"
  • "The journals of Lewis and Clark,"
  • "The journals of Lewis and Clark. A new selection with an introd."
  • "The Journals of [Meriwether] Lewis and [William] Clark."
  • "The Journals of Lewis & Clark /"
  • "Journals of Lewis and Clark"@en
  • "The journals of Lewis & Clark /"
  • "The Journals of Lewis and Clark /"

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