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[Speech by Senator John F. Kennedy, War Memorial Auditorium, Utica, N.Y., September 29, 1960].

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  • "Kennedy states that in the next 5 years, one-fourth of all nations in the United Nations' General Assembly will be African. How will they vote on the great issues? Is the tide of history moving with the U.S., or against it? As the balance of power shifts between Democratic and Communist countries, the U.S. must represent man's best hope for freedom, and identify itself with the future, not the past. The U.S. cannot concern itself with people's problems only when a crisis occurs; it must establish friendly relations with emerging nations from the outset. Domestic and international affairs are interdependent. The U.S. is the last best hope for freedom. If Kennedy is elected, there will still be problems, but the U.S. will be able to demonstrate a national vitality and energy that inspires others to stand with the U.S. for freedom. That is the opportunity and obligation of the American citizen. In conclusion, Kennedy asks the support of New York voters, to help on a journey across the New Frontier."
  • "Kennedy introduces local politicians. He assails Nixon's assertion that political party affiliation means little. Democrats stand for progress; congressional voting records show that Republicans do not. The Democratic Party serves the people; Kennedy cites examples. Even Republican presidential campaign slogans show that that party is interested primarily in maintaining the status quo. Democrats look to the future and stand for progress; the current administration is not looking to the future and making sound judgements which will establish the U.S. as a great power in 1960, 1970, and 1980. U.S. prestige is falling. As the balance of power shifts between Democratic and Communist countries, the U.S. must represent man's best hope for freedom, and identify itself with the future, not the past. The U.S. cannot concern itself with people's problems only when a crisis occurs. It must establish friendly relations with emerging nations from the outset. Domestic and international affairs are interdependent."

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  • "Special event coverage and commentary."
  • "Addresses."
  • "Unedited footage."

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  • "[Speech by Senator John F. Kennedy, War Memorial Auditorium, Utica, N.Y., September 29, 1960]."